Snorting chocolate is an actual thing, but is it safe?

There is now a chocolate you can snort, but should you? [Photo: Pixabay via Pexels]
There is now a chocolate you can snort, but should you? [Photo: Pixabay via Pexels]

Chocolate is basically a gift from the food heavens. AmIright?

We’ve warmed ourselves up with dreamy hot chocolates, we’ve stockpiled chocolate crumpets, and we’re looking forward to spending this summer supping on chocolate ice tea.

But even though chocolate is basically life and you can literally never have too much, we’re a little concerned about the latest choco invention. Because there is now chocolate that exists that you can snort.

Wait, what?

Coco Loko is a chocolate powder brought onto the market by a company called Legal Lean, and it’s made specifically for people to snort.

The unusual product contains cacao powder, as well as gingko biloba, taurine and guarana, which are commonly found in energy drinks.

It’s supposed to boost your levels of serotonin, endorphins and euphoria, and help users to focus.

The company claims Coco Loko results in an endorphin rush which mimics a “runner’s high” and can also produce a euphoric energy “similar to the feeling of ecstasy.”

The product is marketed to people looking to party and who want an extra shot of energy.

Makers claim Coco Loko gives a euphoric type feeling [Photo: Coco Loko/Legal Lean]
Makers claim Coco Loko gives a euphoric type feeling [Photo: Coco Loko/Legal Lean]
Makers claim Coco Loko gives a euphoric type feeling [Photo: Coco Loko/Legal Lean]
Makers claim Coco Loko gives a euphoric type feeling [Photo: Coco Loko/Legal Lean]

Nick Anderson, the 29-year-old founder of Legal Lean, told The Washington Post that he’d heard about a “chocolate-snorting trend” in Europe, so ordered a sample to give it a try.

“At first, I was like, ‘Is this a hoax?,’” he recalled. “And then I tried it and it was like, okay, this is the future right here.”

But doctors are a bit unsure about the potential side effects of the chocolate powder, which hit US shelves last month and is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

“We don’t know what it does to the nose,” Dr. Toby Steele, ENT-otolaryngologist with University of California told ABC10.

He warned that in general, anything going up the nose other than nasal saline can damage mucus membranes, which help trap bacteria and other harmful particles entering the nose.

The nose could also become irritated or blocked and Dr Steele is also concerned that there’s a risk of losing your sense of smell.

Yeah, we think we’ll stick to our unicorn hot chocolate thanks.

Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for non-stop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day. For Twitter updates, follow @YahooStyleUK

Read more from Yahoo Style UK:

Eating more chocolate can decrease risk of a fatal heart condition, study says

Mindfulness could be the key to curbing chocolate cravings

Chocoholics rejoice: Science says the best cure for a cough may be chocolate

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting