• Deep Breath: Here's Exactly What Happens When You Give Birth
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    Women's Health UK

    Deep Breath: Here's Exactly What Happens When You Give Birth

    A gynaecologist explains

  • Dementia diagnosis at a 'record high': Here's how to spot the signs
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    Caroline Allen

    Dementia diagnosis at a 'record high': Here's how to spot the signs

    Dementia is the leading cause of death in Britain.

  • Anabolic Steroids: Why Are Young Men Risking Dangerous Side Effects To Bulk Up?
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    HuffPost UK

    Anabolic Steroids: Why Are Young Men Risking Dangerous Side Effects To Bulk Up?

    Everywhere we turn, the male bodies we're shown are muscular

  • Red and processed meat can shorten your life expectancy, scientists warn
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    Evening Standard

    Red and processed meat can shorten your life expectancy, scientists warn

    Eating red and processed meat increases the risk of an earlier death, experts have warned as they urged people to switch to healthier proteins. Swapping beef, lamb and sausages for fish and vegetables can cut the risk of an earlier death by as much as 17 per cent, according to new research in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). The results showed that people who increased their red and processed meat intake by at least half a serving per day over the eight years had a 10 per cent higher risk of dying in the subsequent eight-year period.

  • These 13 Foods Are Making You Seriously Gassy
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    Women's Health UK

    These 13 Foods Are Making You Seriously Gassy

    And how to side-step the issue

  • Piers Morgan criticises row over GCSE paper said to 'trigger' eating disorders
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    Francesca Specter

    Piers Morgan criticises row over GCSE paper said to 'trigger' eating disorders

    The debate has broken out over a question which asked students to count calories.

  • Average person consumes the equivalent of a credit card each week
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    Francesca Specter

    Average person consumes the equivalent of a credit card each week

    Well, this puts plastic pollution into content.

  • I'm Running 100 Marathons Barefoot Across Britain And This Is What My Feet Look Like
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    HuffPost UK

    I'm Running 100 Marathons Barefoot Across Britain And This Is What My Feet Look Like

    Anna McNuff is tough - and so are her feet

  • Hay fever remedies that work (from the sufferers who swear by them)
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Hay fever remedies that work (from the sufferers who swear by them)

    So long streaming nose.

  • Being denied an abortion can cause women to develop chronic health problems
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    The Independent

    Being denied an abortion can cause women to develop chronic health problems

    Women who are denied access to an abortion are likely to develop long-term health problems, new research suggests.The study, conducted by the University of California, found that women whose requests were denied reported higher rates of chronic pain in the five years after seeking an abortion than those who were granted terminations in their first or second trimester.The researchers tracked the self-reported physical health of around 900 women who sought abortions across the US between 2008 and 2010.This included women who were close to or slightly beyond the gestational limit for performing abortions – which differs by region in the US – as well as those who received first and second trimester abortions.In all, 328 women had a first-trimester abortion, 383 had a second-trimester abortion and 163 were turned away. Each participant provided information about their pain, chronic conditions and overall health when the study began, and twice a year for the next five years.When the study first started, 20 per cent of women who had a first-trimester abortion described their pre-pregnancy health as "fair or poor".In comparison, 17.5 per cent of those who had a second-trimester abortion and about 18 per cent of those who were turned away said the same. After the five years of follow-up, about 20 per cent of women who had an abortion at either stage of pregnancy reported "fair or poor" health.However, among women who were denied an abortion and went on to give birth, the percentage of those who said their health was "fair or poor" rose to 27 per cent.According to the researchers, women who went on to give birth reported higher rates of chronic conditions including headaches, joint pain, asthma and high cholesterol. Meanwhile, two of the women who were denied terminations died from maternal causes, which Lauren Ralph, the study co-author, said “could have been avoided had these women had access to the health care they had sought”.“Our study demonstrates that having an abortion is not detrimental to women’s health, but being denied access to a wanted one likely is,” Ralph told Time magazine.Beyond complications involved with pregnancy and birth, such as excessive bleeding, gestational diabetes and gestational hypertension, Ralph added that the financial implications and stress that may come as a result of being denied an abortion could also negatively impact a woman’s health.The researchers suggest that the findings are especially poignant given the recent slew of US states passing legislation to restrict abortion rights.Ralph said that while many of these policies argue that abortions are dangerous, either mentally or physically, this study proves otherwise. “The argument that abortion harms women is certainly not supported by our data,” Ralph explained. “When differences in health were observed, they were consistently in the direction of worse health among those who gave birth. “The findings from the study can really highlight some of the consequences if we continue to restrict access to wanted abortion.”Several high-profile individuals have publicly condemned the new abortion bans being instated in the US, including Rihanna, Lady Gaga and London mayor Sadiq Khan. Over the last few months, Louisiana, Georgia, Arkansas, Mississippi, Ohio and Alabama have all passed so-called “heartbeart bills” which place restrictions on the gestation time and circumstances in which a woman can obtain an abortion. You can find out more about which countries have the strictest abortion laws here.

  • Sleeping with the light or TV on linked to weight gain in women
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Sleeping with the light or TV on linked to weight gain in women

    Time to invest in an eye mask.

  • My Skin Track UV: tiny device tracks UV exposure and reminds you when to apply suncream
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    Evening Standard

    My Skin Track UV: tiny device tracks UV exposure and reminds you when to apply suncream

    La Roche-Posay’s new beauty tech wearable wants you to change these habits once and for all. Its new device, named My Skin Track UV, is a wearable sensor that measures your exposure to UV, pollution, pollen and humidity and records it all in a companion app on your smartphone. Developed by La Roche-Posay and L’Oreal’s in-house beauty tech incubator, the My Skin Track UV is about helping people understand their skin and how best to take care of it.

  • 'Extreme' lip fillers: Blindness, infection and allergic reaction among risks
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    Francesca Specter

    'Extreme' lip fillers: Blindness, infection and allergic reaction among risks

    “I feel really sad when I see stories like this,” a doctor tells Yahoo UK.

  • Men’s Health Week 2019: What are the symptoms of prostate cancer and how common is it?
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    The Independent

    Men’s Health Week 2019: What are the symptoms of prostate cancer and how common is it?

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer among men in the UK, affecting approximately one in eight men during their lifetime.While the condition is more likely to affect men over the age of 50, it can be diagnosed at a younger age.From symptoms to treatment, here's everything you need to know about prostate cancer: What is prostate cancer?Prostate cancer is a cancer that occurs in the prostate gland, a small gland located at the base of the bladder.The main function of the prostate gland, a male reproductive organ, is to secrete prostate fluid.The prostate gland is about the size of a walnut, but enlarges as men age.It surrounds the first part of the urethra, the tube which carries urine and semen.When prostate cancer develops in the prostate gland, this usually occurs in the outer gland cells of the prostate, Cancer Research UK states. These cells are called acinar adenocarcinomas.Cancer occurs when abnormal cells begin to divide and grow uncontrollably.According to Cancer Research UK, the majority of cases of prostate cancer grow slowly and do not usually spread to other parts of the body.When prostate cancer has spread to another part of the body, it becomes known as advanced prostate cancer. What are the symptoms?Symptoms of prostate cancer may include needing to urinate more frequently; having to rush to the toilet; straining to urinate; feeling as though your bladder hasn't fully emptied while going to the toilet; and blood in urine or semen, the NHS outlines.The NHS adds that these symptoms may not necessarily be indicative of prostate cancer.Older men may experience similar symptoms due to prostate enlargement, which is a non-cancerous condition.Signs that prostate cancer has spread to other areas of the body may include back, hip or pelvis pain; erectile dysfunction; blood in urine or semen; and unexplained weight loss, Prostate Cancer UK states.For more information about prostate cancer symptoms, visit the Prostate Cancer UK website here. What are the causes?While it's not known what causes prostate cancer, several factors may increase one's risk of developing the condition.These include being over the age of 50; whether one has a brother or father who developed prostate cancer before turning 60; being overweight; and following an unhealthy diet, the NHS states.Those of African or African-Caribbean descent may also be at greater risk of being diagnosed with the condition. How common is it?Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer among men in the UK, Prostate Cancer UK states.More than 47,200 men across the UK are diagnosed with prostate cancer on an annual basis.Approximately 35 per cent of new cases of prostate cancer every year are among men aged 75 and over.Prostate cancer can affect anyone with a prostate gland, which can include men, transgender and non-binary people. How can it be treated?Some diagnosed with prostate cancer will not require any treatment at all, the NHS states.A person's treatment may depend on whether their prostate cancer is localised in the prostate gland or has spread to other parts of the body.The NHS explains that a patient with cancer should be cared for by a team of specialists, called a multidisciplinary team.This team of medical professionals may include oncologists, radiographers and specialist nurses, among others.The NHS adds that treatment for prostate cancer is undertaken to either cure the disease, or control symptoms so that they do not shorten a patient's life expectancy.Some older men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer may be advised to carry out "watchful waiting", which is when they keep a close eye to see whether or not they develop any progressive cancer symptoms.They may also be told to do "active surveillance", which involves undergoing tests such as MRI scans and biopsies while avoiding other treatments deemed "unnecessary".Other treatments that patients diagnosed with prostate cancer may undergo include radical prostatectomy, which is the surgical removal of the prostate gland; radiotherapy; hormone therapy; and chemotherapy.If a person's prostate cancer has become too advanced, then it may not be able to be cured.However, treatments such as radiotherapy, hormone treatment and chemotherapy may slow down its progression.For more information about prostate cancer treatment options, visit the NHS website here.For all the latest health news, click here.

  • American performer Billy Porter makes abortion rights statement in suit-gown featuring uterus
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    Francesca Specter

    American performer Billy Porter makes abortion rights statement in suit-gown featuring uterus

    "None of us are free until we’re all free!"

  • What is trypophobia, the unusual phobia Love Island star Yewande Biala suffers from?
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    What is trypophobia, the unusual phobia Love Island star Yewande Biala suffers from?

    "Do you know there's some weird sponges and they have loads and loads of little circles? It creeps me out."

  • Men’s Health Week 2019: What are the symptoms of male breast cancer and how common is it?
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    The Independent

    Men’s Health Week 2019: What are the symptoms of male breast cancer and how common is it?

    Breast cancer is more commonly associated with women than with men, affecting approximately one in eight women in their lifetimes.However, men can still be diagnosed with breast cancer, albeit in far rarer circumstances.While boys do not develop breasts like girls do during puberty, they still have a small amount of breast tissue behind the nipples where breast cancer can develop, Macmillan Cancer Support explains.“Until puberty, breast tissue in boys and girls is the same. Both have a small amount of breast tissue behind the nipple and areola (the darker area of skin around the nipple),” the charity states.“This is made up of a few tiny tubes (ducts) surrounded by fatty tissue, connective tissue, blood vessels and lymphatic vessels.”In October 2018, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Florida have announced that they are developing a new anti-cancer vaccine that they believe will prevent an aggressive form of breast cancer from recurring, with the hope of benefitting scores of women and men affected by the disease in future.So how common is it for a man to be diagnosed with breast cancer, what are the signs that men should look out for and how can it be treated? Here’s everything you need to know: How common is male breast cancer?Around 390 men are diagnosed with breast cancer every year in the UK in comparison to 54,800 women, according to Cancer Research UK.Men who are between the ages of 60 and 70 are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease.Furthermore, men who have particularly high oestrogen levels also have more risk of developing the cancer.As with women, if a man has family members who have had breast cancer in the past, then his chances of also developing the cancer will increase.“Around three in 100 breast cancers diagnosed in women are thought to be due directly to an inherited faulty gene (around three per cent). In men this might be more common,” Cancer Research UK explains.“Doctors think that between 10 and 20 out of every 100 breast cancers diagnosed in men are due to inherited faulty genes (10 to 20 per cent).” What are the symptoms?The most common symptom for breast cancer that men need to look out for is a lump in the breast tissue that can be felt close to the nipple.Lumps that require medical assessment may also be found further away from the nipple.Additional signs of breast cancer can include symptoms such as liquid discharge being emitted from the nipple; a nipple that’s inverted or feels sensitive; swelling in the chest area; ulcers in the chest or nipple area; or lymph nodes in the armpit area, as outlined by Breast Cancer Care.The charity recommends visiting your GP as soon as you notice any changes to your breast area that could correspond to the aforementioned symptoms. How can a man check for breast cancer symptoms?His Breast Cancer, an organisation that raises awareness about male breast cancer, explains how men can carry out a self-breast exam.First, stand topless in front of a mirror, placing your arms on your hips. Look closely at your chest area, noting any changes to your nipples such as swelling or inversion.Then, raise your arms above your head and inspect the areas around your chest and your armpits.The next step is to feel your chest for any potential lumps, which can be done by moving your fingertips in a circular motion around the breast area."You can perform this in either an up and down method, a circular or a wedge pattern, but try to be consistent using the same method each time," His Breast Cancer states."In addition, check the nipple area for any discharge. Complete on both breasts."You can also inspect the chest area by lying down, placing a pillow under your right shoulder and placing your right arm over your head.Using the fingertips on your left hand, press down on the chest and armpit areas, before repeating the process on the other side. How can it be treated?The majority of men diagnosed with breast cancer may have to undergo a mastectomy, explains Breast Health UK. This procedure would then be followed by radiotherapy treatment targeted at the chest area in order to kill any remaining cancer cells.It can take between four to six weeks to recover from a mastectomy, as outlined by the NHS, with the operation lasting approximately 90 minutes.A person who’s had a mastectomy may decide to have a breast reconstruction procedure afterwards, in order to replace any tissue that’s been removed.A man who’s undergone a mastectomy may have to have chemotherapy and hormone therapy afterwards.This can depend on a number of factors, such as the size of the breast cancer tumour and whether or not the cancerous cells have spread.“As with female breast cancer, if the cancer is caught in the early stages, a cure may be possible,” Breast Health UK states.“This is why early detection is important as once the cancer becomes more advanced, the prognosis and survival will be worse and long-term cure may not be possible."