• Why FGM Needs To Be Taught In Primary Schools
    Style
    Refinery 29 UK

    Why FGM Needs To Be Taught In Primary Schools

    The dangers of FGM (female genital mutilation) should be taught to children in primary schools, campaigners are urging. Under new government guidelines announced in February, secondary school pupils in England will be taught about FGM as part of their relationships and sex education curriculum from 2020. Lessons will also impress on pupils that FGM is illegal in the UK.

  • What is the anaconda sex position?
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    What is the anaconda sex position?

    Cue confused face emoji.

  • 2019 TV Scorecard: Which Shows Have Been Renewed or Canceled Already?
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    Pop Sugar UK Entertainment

    2019 TV Scorecard: Which Shows Have Been Renewed or Canceled Already?

    With each passing week our favorite shows are wrapping up, but we're also getting news about renewals and cancellations for next season. While shows like Showtime's Shameless will be back for another round, others like Netflix's One Day at a Time have gotten the ax.

  • Twitter users call out FaceApp's 'age challenge' for being sexist
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Twitter users call out FaceApp's 'age challenge' for being sexist

    The app has had the mother of all comebacks this week.

  • Electric dreams: at last a glimpse of reality
    Style
    The Independent

    Electric dreams: at last a glimpse of reality

    Over a weekend when everyone is gazing back into space, allow me a glance towards the future of aviation.The most exciting technological development for your flying and mine in the coming decades is nothing to do with high speed or ultra-long range. Rather, it is about slow, short but clean hops.Electric cars are easy. Weight is not too much of an issue, extremes of power are unnecessary and when the battery starts running down you can safely and easily pull into one of the increasing number of service stations with fast-charge facilities, buy a cup of tea and read an article like this before you motor on, quietly. My first experience this week of a fully electric vehicle, on the A5 in north Wales this week, made me realise that it is an extremely civilised form of transport. So what is to stop us transforming that to aviation? Physics.While small electric-powered craft have made successful flights, the challenge is to create planes that are big enough and have sufficient range to compete with conventional aircraft.The main issue is that aviation fuel contains a vast amount of energy in each kilogram, and has the added bonus of vanishing once it has done its work – conveniently reducing the weight of the plane, and therefore its fuel burn.The problem for designers of clean planes: boosting the power-to-weight ratio of the batteries. Even the most efficient cells struggle to deliver more than a tiny fraction of hydrocarbon power from the equivalent weight.Wright Electric, which aims “for every short flight to be electric within 20 years”, candidly admits that its plans depend on the weight (and volume) of batteries shrinking while power remains constant: “With present technology, we’d quickly use up all our energy at takeoff and never get anywhere.”Of the many start-ups seeking to revolutionise air travel, Wright was the first to team up with a leading UK airline, easyJet. But the budget airline will be strictly kerosene powered for the foreseeable future.Across at Heathrow, the airport’s boss says the first electric-hybrid aircraft to use Heathrow Airport will escape landing charges for a year – a prize worth up to £1m – and hopes it will be touching down by 2030. Note the “hybrid” – with the punch of hydrocarbons pushing the plane into the sky, before batteries taking care of the cruise.But at the Paris Air Show in June, the tiny US airline Cape Air signed a “letter of intent” for 10 or more nine-seater commuter planes made by Eviation.The name of the plane is Alice. The aircraft manufacturer says: “Alice uses distributed propulsion with one main pusher propeller at the tail and two pusher propellers at the wingtips to reduce drag, create redundancy, and improve efficiency.“We’re bridging distances and opening a range of new destinations accessible for on-demand transportation by enabling emission-free air travel for the price of a train ticket.”Its electric plane, called Alice, will fly up to 650 miles at an impressive 300mph.Cape Air is the perfect customer. It is based in Hyannis on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and mainly flies rich people to and from their homes in Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. The airline currently uses small Cessna 402 aircraft, with about the same payload. The fare for a Friday evening 91-mile, 48-minute hop between Boston and Nantucket is an impressive $339 (£271), which would help pay the $4m (£3.2m) price tag on those planes.A letter of intent, let me remind you, is a non-binding order; British Airways’ parent company, IAG, signed one with Boeing for 200 737 Max jets at the same French fair.But if commercial electric aviation is to flourish, it will need to start with short hops for wealthy individuals.

  • Shane Dawson's latest YouTube documentary focuses on eating disorders
    Style
    Cosmo

    Shane Dawson's latest YouTube documentary focuses on eating disorders

    YouTube star Eugenia Cooney opened up to the film maker about her experience in rehab.

  • Sharon Stone warns people about the early signs of a stroke
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Sharon Stone warns people about the early signs of a stroke

    She wants to share her story with others in a bid to help people to spot the signs of a stroke early.

  • Chanel opens a luxury yacht club
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Chanel opens a luxury yacht club

    The chic space is open to the public

  • From the Crusades to robotic cases, the surprisingly interesting 1,000-year history of luggage
    Style
    The Telegraph

    From the Crusades to robotic cases, the surprisingly interesting 1,000-year history of luggage

    It seems ridiculous that we put a man on the Moon before anyone had the idea to add wheels to our suitcases, but until 1972, tourists were still lugging their gear around by the handle.

  • Richard Branson on watching Apollo 11 in his pyjamas, the future of space travel and Elon Musk
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    The Telegraph

    Richard Branson on watching Apollo 11 in his pyjamas, the future of space travel and Elon Musk

    Last December I was in the Mojave Desert watching the launch of Virgin Galactic’s first flight into space. Hundreds of heads raised, hundreds of eyes focused; silent thoughts willing the tiny, streaking orange dot to move faster, higher. And then those long-awaited words: ‘364,000 feet. Virgin Spaceship Unity, welcome to space!’ The crowd erupted with joy and relief. Overwhelmed by tears, I bowed towards the ground, my head in my hands.

  • The Game of Thrones Cast reunites at Comic Con
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    Harper’s Bazaar

    The Game of Thrones Cast reunites at Comic Con

    Maisie Williams, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Isaac Hempstead Wright, and more made a joint appearance

  • 10 of the best empowering Duchess of Sussex quotes to live by
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    10 of the best empowering Duchess of Sussex quotes to live by

    We look back at Meghan's wisest words

  • Prince Charles and Chris Packham are planning something big
    Style
    Country Living

    Prince Charles and Chris Packham are planning something big

    The pair met in May when Chris was awarded a CBE

  • You can buy an entire tropical island for the same price as a one-bedroom London flat
    Style
    House Beautiful

    You can buy an entire tropical island for the same price as a one-bedroom London flat

    Comes with four houses and a coral reef metres from your front door

  • This Is How Much Being Single (& Looking) Costs You A Year
    Style
    Refinery 29 UK

    This Is How Much Being Single (& Looking) Costs You A Year

    Single Brits spend an average of £106.06 on a date, and go on up to 13 of them a year, according to a poll of 2,000 people by a leading dating website. Interestingly, Plenty of Fish 's research found that people spend more on pre-date prep than the date itself. On average, men spend £74 on preparation costs such as personal grooming, new clothes and haircuts, while women spend an average of £53 ahead of the date.

  • Is this the most spectacular railway journey in Europe?
    Style
    Country Living

    Is this the most spectacular railway journey in Europe?

    Some even consider it the greatest in the world...

  • We Met On Tinder, Now We're Getting Married: 3 Couples Who Found Love Online
    Style
    Refinery 29 UK

    We Met On Tinder, Now We're Getting Married: 3 Couples Who Found Love Online

    "I hope you don’t mind cheesy chat-up lines, but if you were a fruit, you’d be a fineapple."

  • These Magical Photos About Sisterhood & Home Feel Like A Fairy Tale
    Style
    Refinery 29 UK

    These Magical Photos About Sisterhood & Home Feel Like A Fairy Tale

    This is especially true for Russian-born photographer Turkina Faso and her sister Alice, who grew up in a small town in the foothills of the North Caucasus, surrounded by vast expanses of rugged natural beauty and wilderness in the shadow of dramatic mountain peaks. Faso is significantly older than her sister, so much so that she was already away studying by the time Alice was 2 years old, and so they found themselves having grown up in the same place – a place that fundamentally connected them – but nearly a whole childhood apart. Wondering how to bridge that emotional gap between them, Faso turned to photography, and began making pictures of Alice as a way to connect with her.

  • Marques’Almeida: The London Label Loved By Its Artists, Musicians & Models
    Style
    Refinery 29 UK

    Marques’Almeida: The London Label Loved By Its Artists, Musicians & Models

    In a fashion landscape dictated by algorithms, where social media enforces homogeny and press releases are regurgitated, London-based label Marques’Almeida is keeping the rebellion alive. Founded in 2011 by Portuguese designers Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida, the brand is a longtime favourite of cool kids the world over, thanks in large part to the duo identifying a shift in the way young women and men engage with luxury fashion. Marta and Paulo have long championed their collective of M’A girls and boys, and this week they gave the power back to the people by hosting a 'gathering' to showcase their latest collection, shunning the traditional catwalk structure and instead allowing their community to frame their own gaze.