• Entertainment
    Refinery 29 UK

    You Have 7 New Netflix Treats To Binge This Weekend — Here’s What’s Worth Watching

    The last few weeks of Netflix premieres have been super-sized. On Friday, May 29, however, the streaming service is pulling back a little. Rather than a dozen new series, movies, and specials, we’ll only get a handful — paired with some big premieres earlier in the week.  Don't think that less content equals less of a punch, though. Today, we get Space Force, the long-hyped workplace comedy starring Steve Carrell, which he co-created with Office writer Greg Daniels. Space Force stands as a marriage of the internet's most beloved sitcoms since Lisa Kudrow — aka Friends’ Phoebe Buffay — plays Office alum Carrell’s on-screen wife. Earlier this week, Netflix also released two extremely different buzzy projects: Douglas and Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich. The former is comedian Hannah Gadsby’s followup to her award-winning special Nanette. Miniseries Filthy Rich is a chilling look into the world of sex criminal and late financier Jeffrey Epstein. On top of those new releases, you have a foodie show, some Spanish-language movies, and an anime to consider binging over the weekend.  These are all the new Netflix offerings broken down by plot, genre, and whether you should watch something immediately or skip for now. Keep reading for the lowdown on all of these Netflix treats, including their trailers. Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?The Hottest Sex Scenes On Netflix ShowsWho's Who On 'Control Z'The Top 10 Titles Streaming On Netflix

  • Sweet detail you may not have noticed in Prince William's documentary
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Style UK

    Sweet detail you may not have noticed in Prince William's documentary

    Eagle-eyed viewers noticed something Prince William was wearing during his documentary.

  • Greece has plans to welcome tourists from mid-June, but not from the UK
    News
    Cosmo

    Greece has plans to welcome tourists from mid-June, but not from the UK

    Our number of coronavirus cases is still deemed too high

  • In the air tonight: Air Canada offers rock-star comfort – and social distancing – with ‘Covid class’
    Business
    The Independent

    In the air tonight: Air Canada offers rock-star comfort – and social distancing – with ‘Covid class’

    The Rolling Stones got satisfaction from Air Canada’s special Airbus A319. Like them and Phil Collins, you can try the plane in the air tonight.With passengers nervous about commercial aviation in the age of coronavirus, the Canadian airline is deploying special Airbus A319 aircraft fitted with only 58 seats on commuter air routes

  • Beat the Heat This Summer With These 5 Humidity-Reducing House Plants
    Lifestyle
    Pop Sugar UK Home

    Beat the Heat This Summer With These 5 Humidity-Reducing House Plants

    While summer is arguably the best time of the year, it doesn't come without caveat: humidity. The warmth of the sun from May until August is my favorite thing in the whole world, but I can certainly acknowledge that almost nothing is worse than lying awake all night long, drenched in sweat due to the humidity that inevitably comes with summer. Fortunately for those of us who are not blessed with central air to cool off our homes, Mother Nature always has a few tricks up her sleeve. There are actually a variety of house plants that help lower humidity by absorbing their required moisture from the air. I love a good succulent as much as the next plant parent, but you better believe I'll be incorporating some of these plants into my hotter-than-hell apartment to get through the upcoming months! Related: Enjoy the Flavor of Homegrown Food With These 20 Edible Garden Plants

  • Prince Harry praises coronavirus volunteers during video call from LA home: 'Helping people makes you feel better'
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Style UK

    Prince Harry praises coronavirus volunteers during video call from LA home: 'Helping people makes you feel better'

    Harry called young people who are delivering food and medicine to their neighbours.

  • News
    AOL

    Neighbours rescue woman hanging upside down from seventh-floor laundry rack

    Heroic neighbours rescued a woman who was hanging upside down from a laundry rack seven floors of the ground in eastern China. The video, filmed in the city of Yangzhou in Jiangsu Province on May 24, shows a woman hanging upside down from a bent

  • All The Ways Your Life Is Likely To Change After Coronavirus
    Lifestyle
    Elle

    All The Ways Your Life Is Likely To Change After Coronavirus

    From staycations, to dinner parties, to no more hot desking, ELLE investigates the knock-on effects of the past 10 weeks

  • Celebrity
    Elle

    Forbes Reports Kylie Jenner Is No Longer A Billionaire And Was Inflating Her Net Worth

    Kylie Cosmetics is "less profitable than the family has spent years leading the cosmetics industry and media outlets to believe."

  • At Home With POPSUGAR: How I Turned My Bedroom Into a Whitewashed Beach Bungalow
    Lifestyle
    Pop Sugar UK Home

    At Home With POPSUGAR: How I Turned My Bedroom Into a Whitewashed Beach Bungalow

    There's a passage I love in the book Small Pleasures about how small islands and their obvious boundaries - "limited, defined, contained" - tap into a pleasing sense of control in our psyches, a remedy to how busy daily life can be. That's the appeal of minimalism to me, especially living in Brooklyn, NY: designing a space that cuts through the noise and quiets my mind. In my case, that means an open floor plan, lots of light, and decor that's intentional. Enter my simple, whitewashed bedroom. It's a room I try hard to keep tidy, as inspired by the hotel rooms I lived out of for the first two years I worked from "home" for POPSUGAR before settling down in NYC last year. I'm inspired by off-whites, earthy tones, and sea blues - all mainstays of my months-long stints in Greece. Wherever your small islands are, and whatever color palette puts you at ease, I hope the calm of my room inspires you to carve out a peaceful space in your home, too. Related: At Home With POPSUGAR: How I Completely Renovated My NYC Apartment

  • We Might Have Been Blindsided, But These Two Astrologers Saw The Crisis Coming
    Lifestyle
    Elle

    We Might Have Been Blindsided, But These Two Astrologers Saw The Crisis Coming

    ‘We could feel a crumbling of the whole world happening’

  • Lifestyle
    Refinery 29 UK

    Cocaine, Coronavirus & Me

    Since the lockdown began, one positive and unforeseen consequence of self-isolating – away from the city and my flat and my friends – is that I’ve stopped using cocaine cold turkey. It’s not just that I’ve quit (which, when I tell you what I’m about to tell you, is somewhat miraculous); it’s that I’ve had the time and space to think about how and why I was using drugs, and it’s been downright revelatory.  I always liked drugs but when I started taking coke, about seven years ago, I found a drug I loved. As I’m sure you’ve heard, cocaine is very moreish. What started as a once-in-a-blue-moon habit slowly became a once-maybe-twice-a-week thing. I went from being the girl who does a line at a party to the girl who is close friends with at least one of the half-dozen dealers in her phone at any given time. > I took coke at weddings, funerals, anniversaries – any time, any place, with anyone. I’ve had more people’s keys up my nose than you’ve had hot dinners.Eventually, no night was complete without it. I’d sit in beer gardens at 8pm buzzing, taking trips to the loo every 20 minutes for a little boost. I’d turn up at galleries, charged; go to dinners where I had no interest in the food. I’d be the one in the bedroom at parties, racking up lines and snorting them off someone’s copy of the latest Zadie Smith. I took coke at weddings, funerals, anniversaries – any time, any place, with anyone. I’ve had more people’s keys up my nose than you’ve had hot dinners.Things escalated, or should I say spiralled. There were still patches when I would stay clean for a month (Dry January) or maybe a fortnight (on family holidays) or the odd week (when no one would reply to my thirsty messages). Eventually, I was taking coke every week without fail.Despite that, words like ‘user’, ‘addict’ and ‘junkie’ – alongside their counterpart concepts, ‘clean’ and ‘sober’ – seemed foreign to me, far removed from my life with a decent job, credit cards and scatter cushions from Anthropologie. But I was doing more, and more often. Was I an addict? It’s something I have asked myself and internet search engines many times. I guess if you have to google this question, the answer is probably yes.  Two years ago I would have said no. Party girl – yes. Up for a laugh – certainly! Doesn’t know when to call it a night – that’s me! But of course that’s not me at all. That’s me in fancy dress, playing a part because sometimes we hate being ourselves. Coke made me feel confident and sexy, two things I rarely feel without it, but here’s the catch: none of that is real. The confidence is all talk, no action and there is nothing sexy about vomiting bile into a toilet bowl you are holding like it’s your lover’s neck on a Sunday night when you have to be at work in a few hours. There was no one moment when I realised that things had taken a turn but I do recall a guy I was sleeping with asking if I might have a problem when I disturbed our post-coital cuddle to take a bump. Never called him again. I also remember offering a friend a line once and she said: “Maybe later.” I thought, What? Who waits until later? Because I certainly couldn’t, oh and fat chance there’d be any left later. Then there was the horrible, frantic night I turned my house upside down at 5am, throwing clothes out of wardrobes, rifling through bags and searching every pocket to see if I could find a little bit more. > Big nights out were always followed by a physical and mental nosedive. I’d order pizza, watch shit TV and silence my phone when it rang. I didn’t want anyone to see me, because I was a mess. Did I get fired? No. I did a very good job at work. Didn’t my friends tell me to cut it out? Nope. Didn’t my family suspect? Not one bit and if they did, no one said a word. Enough of all that, let’s talk about the good times! Because there were good times. I loved staying up late, dancing all night…and you make so many friends!There are the friends who take all your gear and then sneak off to the bar to buy themselves a single pint, the nice chaps who try to slide into bed with your girlfriend who has passed out cold, and the dealers who will slap your face at a party before pulling down their pants to show you their cock (he did give me a few free balloons, mind). I’m not saying this to shock. I’m saying this to remind myself of what actually happened, because I think I’ve done enough sugar coating. I did have good times sitting up all night with a few equally ‘dedicated’ mates but we can do that without the gak, and it’s much less likely that we’ll end up in a raging fight at 4am over a Trivial Pursuit question. For so long – I’m talking years – the highs did seem to outweigh the monumental lows, so much so that I was willing to put up with them. But over time, even cocaine is subject to the law of diminishing returns. It became a self-inflicted cycle: get high, crash, swear I’ll never do it again and then, five days later after a spat with my mother, an unkind word at work or a morsel of bad news, I’d get the phone out, order a bag, problem solved!Big nights out were always followed by a physical and mental nosedive. I’d order pizza, watch shit TV and silence my phone when it rang. I didn’t want anyone to see me, because I was a mess. I piled on weight (not true that all addicts are skinny) and my eyes got duller. I lost my zest and then there was the baggage (anxiety and bouts of depression) that came with it. There were the tears of terror and desperation, no sleep for 48 hours, exhaustion. I’m not saying this to shock you either. It frightens me when I think how irresponsible I’ve been with my health, my body, my life. It’s not like I didn’t try to do something. I went to an NA meeting once and shook like a leaf all the way home (it scared me sufficiently to refrain for four days). I rang one counsellor who told me that because I wasn’t suicidal, they couldn’t help; another called back and I told her what I was taking. She commented: “That’s quite a lot.” “You should meet my friends,” I said. > I took drugs not because I’m a bad person or a bit of a party animal but because I was in pain, and people in pain will drink, fuck or snort it away if they don’t know what else to do. The silence is still ringing in my ears. I was referred to a drugs-only service which I emailed, detailing the extent of my problem. I’ve never heard back from them to this day. I almost set up a meeting with a private therapist who decided I couldn’t afford it (ha!). But listen, it’s no one else’s fault, because I could have just stopped. I blamed my friends, one in particular who was fond of a line – but then she moved abroad and two months later I was still at it every week so, hmmm, maybe it wasn’t her after all. And then again, I did do coke alone (very bad sign) so was it really other people? People who take coke the way I did will blame literally anything but coke for their problems: I’m stressed, depressed, I’m an alcoholic, my parents are crap, I’m crap, I’m just wired this way, YOLO, I’m supporting local businesses. They will do anything but admit that a little bag of powder is calling the shots.  I went to therapy for depression and anxiety (nothing at all to do with the coke, I swear!) and was semi-honest with the kind woman there about the frequency and volume of my use. After sessions where we had dealt with hard stuff, I’d come outside feeling sick, dizzy and disoriented. Once, I got on a bus going in the wrong direction. But then, later, I’d feel relieved, lighter and very sleepy. Once, after missing a few sessions (nothing to do with the coke, I tell you!) the therapist told me she wouldn’t carry on until I stopped using so she could find my ‘base level’. I took the rap on the knuckles, promised to see her next week, arranged to meet a mate in the pub, reached for my phone and oh, yes I did – I called my dealer. I look back on that now, feeling disappointed and guilty but also with a bit of empathy. I took drugs not because I’m a bad person or a bit of a party animal but because I was in pain, and people in pain will drink, fuck or snort it away if they don’t know what else to do. Now, because of coronavirus I am at home with my family. My day-to-day has changed dramatically. I exercise, cook averagely and eat well. I tidy up and make small talk with my parents. I read, drink hot chocolate and lots of tea. I talk to friends on the phone every day and go to bed early (I wake five or six times a night but then listen to a lady with a nice voice talk about the stars and eventually I fall back to sleep). And here’s the thing: I’ve not had a single craving. I do have an app that asks me to make a pledge to stick to my sobriety in the morning (I’ve had this app before and reset the counter to zero probably 30 times). I tick a box at the end of the day to say I’m still clean and am rewarded with a motivational message: “You are what you do. Tomorrow you will be whatever you did today.” They are cheesy but sometimes I read them two or three times to let them sink in. I’m doing this. There is a community of other cokeheads just like me on the app, sharing stories just like mine. The app allows you to track your changes: better mood, happier relationships, improved energy, mental clarity. It also tells me I’ve saved £500 so far and 50 hours of my time. > Because of coronavirus I am at home with my family. My day-to-day has changed dramatically. I exercise, cook averagely and eat well. I read, drink hot chocolate and lots of tea. I talk to friends on the phone every day and go to bed early. I’m doing this.  I’m hyperaware that when this all ends I could easily slide back into my old ways. I am in no way trivialising addiction but I feel different. It’s like a switch has flicked inside me. I see myself and blame no one but me. I still think there were genuine good times when I was high, I just recognise that the party ended a long time ago. Now it’s well and truly over for me, too. It’s only been six weeks but that’s longer than I’ve been off any type of drug for a decade. In just this short lockdown timeframe, the thought of spending £60 on a gram and snorting it has come to feel foreign, unwanted, unpleasant. I’m not naive enough (or maybe not yet brave enough) to say I’ll never do coke again, but I’m grateful to know that I can live without it. If you are struggling with substance abuse, please visit FRANK or call 0300 123 6600 for friendly, confidential advice. Lines are open 24 hours a day.If you’re worried about your own or someone else’s drinking, please contact Drinkline on 0300 123 1110.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?How My Mental Health Altered After I Took Acid"It Landed Me In Therapy": Cocaine & Mental HealthWhen Solo Quarantine Drinking Becomes A Problem

  • Anatomy of a socially-distanced garden party
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Anatomy of a socially-distanced garden party

    Lockdown is easing just as we get into summer. For those in England, we will be able to meet in groups of six outside, including in private gardens, from Monday. Which means one thing: barbecue! But... with everyone staying two metres apart. How will that work? What do you need to consider before opening your front door to others? And what happens about the loo? Read on for our unofficial guide... Stage One: Saying hello Everyone has done it: you put out your hand to shake, but they go for a hug and your hand is squashed between you, every muscle tensed to make sure your fingers don’t accidentally skim a boob. Humiliating. (Of course, it’s hilarious when it happens to someone else: when we were just out of school, a friend of mine said goodbye to another friend’s mum. Each tried to kiss the other on the cheek, but they fudged it and ended up kissing on the lips. Brilliantly entertaining.) Anyway, no need to worry about such front-door faux pas in the new age of coronavirus, where there's a strict no touching rule in place. It's overzealous waves all round, then. If you’re a host: Open the door, say hello and stand back, so the message of “don’t approach” is clear. If you’re a guest: Hold onto the bottle of plonk you’ve brought, and say you’ll put it down when you get to the garden. Stage Two: Getting a drink Social distancing is a terrific excuse for keeping all the booze you’ve brought to yourself. The government says you need to be very careful about passing glasses and crockery between each other, as this could spread the virus. As a host, you could demand everyone brings their own beers, which will save you a lot of money; and as a guest, you can splurge on something nice, knowing you’ll get to finish it yourself. Win-win. If you’re a host: Thoroughly clean all glasses before handing them out. Leave people to get their own drinks and don’t pass them around. If you’re a guest: Bring a good stash, so there’s at least something left at the end as a thank-you and you look thoughtful.

  • Today Was Supposed to Be Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi Wedding Day
    Celebrity
    Town & Country

    Today Was Supposed to Be Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi Wedding Day

    The couple's celebration was postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Can I have a holiday in the UK? Coronavirus travel rules explained
    News
    Country Living

    Can I have a holiday in the UK? Coronavirus travel rules explained

    England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland each have specific rules to follow

  • Prince George's billionaire godfather donates £1m to mental health research after Prince William's documentary
    Health
    Yahoo Style UK

    Prince George's billionaire godfather donates £1m to mental health research after Prince William's documentary

    Hugh Grosvenor made the donation to a project researching the mental health of the UK in lockdown.

  • Lockdown: Dentists to reopen for face-to-face appointments in June
    News
    The Independent

    Lockdown: Dentists to reopen for face-to-face appointments in June

    Since 23 March when the UK went into lockdown, anyone requiring a non-urgent appointment with their dentist has had to wait.Emergency dental work has been available, but with skeleton staff and concerns around transmission of Covid-19 between patients and staff working in such a close-contact environment, NHS England stopped all routine, non-urgent dental care and orthodontics.

  • Kate Middleton has been giving her children DIY haircuts during lockdown
    Celebrity
    Cosmo

    Kate Middleton has been giving her children DIY haircuts during lockdown

    She's been colouring her own hair, too!

  • Please Enjoy These Photos of Jennifer Garner Pushing Her Cat in a Stroller
    Celebrity
    Elle

    Please Enjoy These Photos of Jennifer Garner Pushing Her Cat in a Stroller

    Just a normal day in the Garner household.

  • These Meghan Markle-inspired earrings are back in stock
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Style UK

    These Meghan Markle-inspired earrings are back in stock

    Meghan Markle has worn a pair of diamond Snowstorm earrings on a number of occasion, and now we can get the look for less.

  • 5 Easy Baking Recipes For When You Can’t Make Any More Banana Bread
    Lifestyle
    Refinery 29 UK

    5 Easy Baking Recipes For When You Can’t Make Any More Banana Bread

    After spending almost two and a half months confined to our homes, many of us have turned to baking to keep ourselves occupied. While many of you (yes, you reader) have been perfecting your banana bread during the lockdown, we get that you might want to try something new. Why not try your hand a few other classics that even Bake Off's Mary Berry would be proud of: a classic lemon drizzle cake, chocolate chip cookies or even a deliciously decadent cinnamon roll. Now that we're allowed to see our socialise at a distance, what better way to show our loved ones we've missed them than with a delicious baked treat. Ahead we've pulled together a selection of our favourite non-banana bread baking recipes for you to try. If you think you need to be a pasty chef to pull these off, think again. These recipes are super easy and super quick, perfect for when you and your friends are craving a treat. Happy baking!Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?I'm Cooking My Way Through A 1968 Recipe Book5 Food Writers Getting Us Through Lockdown5 Sourdough Recipes That Aren't Bread

  • Britain's best accessible walks for wheelchair users
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Britain's best accessible walks for wheelchair users

    In 2008, my life changed forever. At 47 I was diagnosed with spinal degeneration. Quicker than I could have imagined, I was a wheelchair user.