• How to get Wimbledon tickets
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    Harper’s Bazaar

    How to get Wimbledon tickets

    Missed out on the ballot? There's still thechance to snag yourself a ticket. Here's how…

  • Is this the ultimate seasonaire job? How to ski your way around Japan next winter
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    The Telegraph

    Is this the ultimate seasonaire job? How to ski your way around Japan next winter

    Working a ski season is a life-changing experience, whether you’re fresh out of university or looking for a break from the traditional nine-to-five. Next winter prospective seasonaires have the opportunity to make it even more special with the chance to work in one of the world’s most sought-after ski destinations: Japan.

  • The Act’s Patricia Arquette on how she got into character as Dee Dee Blanchard
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    Cosmo

    The Act’s Patricia Arquette on how she got into character as Dee Dee Blanchard

    The Hulu series follows the true story of Gypsy Rose Blanchard, who orchestrated the murder of her mother

  • Tacky, faded, but still bags of fun – why this Yorkshire seaside town is ready for a comeback
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    The Telegraph

    Tacky, faded, but still bags of fun – why this Yorkshire seaside town is ready for a comeback

    Bridlington – or Brid – is the big bag-for-life of fun. The whole package. Especially when the Yorkshire weather starts warming up and everyone’s suddenly out. Fairground rides are creaking back to life, and gulls are perched, ready in waiting for the new season’s offering of vinegar-soaked chips and bubblegum-flavour ice cream. If you were brought up on seasides as a child, this is the nostalgia you’ve been craving.

  • River cruising continues to rise in popularity as visitor numbers soar
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    The Telegraph

    River cruising continues to rise in popularity as visitor numbers soar

    River cruises are on the rise. A total of 232,300 river cruises were taken by British and Irish holidaymakers last year, an increase of 10.4 per cent from 2017, according to figures released from Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) UK today.

  • Heathrow expansion: what is the masterplan and what does it mean for passengers?
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    The Independent

    Heathrow expansion: what is the masterplan and what does it mean for passengers?

    Europe’s biggest airport this morning revealed detailed plans for a third runway.Here are the key points. What’s the big idea?London is the world capital of aviation, measured by passenger numbers. The city’s six airports handle around 170 million passengers a year, way ahead of New York, Dubai and Shanghai.But the city’s two biggest airports, Heathrow and Gatwick, are working at way beyond their design limits, and are respectively the busiest two-runway and single-runway airports in Europe.Even with Stansted, Luton, London City and Southend having room to grow, southeast England has a chronic lack of capacity compared with any other world city. Sought-after “slots” for taking off and landing at Europe’s busiest airport change hands for tens of millions of pounds, reflecting the premium that passengers are prepared to pay to fly in and out of Heathrow.After years of prevarication and a series of investigations, the government has approved plans to build a third runway, northwest of the existing two, to open in 2026.On 18 June 2019, the airport revealed its masterplan. It includes a vast amount of detail, from changes in air-traffic control procedures to moving allotments. But the headlines are clear.The number of flights using Heathrow annually is set to increase from the current 476,000 to 756,000 by 2050 – an increase of 59 per cent in take-offs and landings.The number of passengers would increase from 80 million to 142 million, a rise of 77 per cent.The airport’s “operational footprint” will expand from 4.5 square miles to 7 square miles.And the growth would begin even before the runway opens. How can any more flights be squeezed in without an extra runway?The airport has a cunning plan to harness using new navigation technology to add up to 10 extra take-offs and landings an hour; the current average is around 70. Under the proposals, use of both runways for arrivals will increase. Air-traffic controllers would use “independent parallel approaches” rather the current requirement to have aircraft separated diagonally. There would also be reduced separation for arrivals and departures of “compatible” planes – ie those of roughly the same size. The increase would begin as soon as planning permission is granted, with two tranches: 15,000 from 2022, and the remaining 10,000 by 2025. The airport uses the term “Brexit boost” to estimate annual benefits to be £1.5bn.The plan assumes a budget airline will base four aircraft at Terminal 2. This is expected to be easyJet.It would mean that capacity wasn’t all “switched on” at the same time, making it easier for airlines – particularly British Airways, which has more than half the operations – to plan their expansion. When the runway is finished, how will terminals be organised?There will be no new terminals initially. But by 2050 there will be a total of 10 terminal areas, including satellites, making Heathrow more complex than ever.The plan at the eastern end is for Terminal 2 A, B, C and D – with the latter roughly where Terminal 3 is now (it is to be demolished). T4D will be close to the existing Terminal 5C, which like T5B is a satellite. Terminal 5 itself gets a twin, Terminal 5X.To the north, and outside the “toast-rack” pattern, Terminal 5XN will be connected by a shuttle. Like the existing Terminal 4, it will be disconnected from the main terminal system.The minimum connecting time between the two is likely to be two hours – compared with a maximum of 50 minutes at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. What does expansion mean for the passengers?“Passengers will experience a new generation of airport with increased comfort, clarity of organisation and gateway experiences.” But they will also get more destinations, higher frequencies and possibly lower fares. How will passengers and staff reach the expanded Heathrow?The aim is to achieve a public transport mode share of at least 50 per cent by 2030 for passengers, The airport is promising cheaper tickets on the Heathrow Express – the most expensive rail line in Britain – as well as earlier and later services.From towns which do not have direct links, Heathrow is promising services from Maidenhead, Aylesbury, Camberley, Bracknell and Cobham.Staff parking places will be halved by 2040.For passengers, two new parking areas will be created: the Northern Parkway close to the M4, and the Southern Parkway served from the M25. But Robert Barnstone, campaign coordinator of Stop Heathrow Expansion, said: “Not only does [Heathrow] want to disrupt people’s lives for up to 30 years while building this new runway but now proposes jumbo-size car parks whilst pledging to reduce the number of people using cars at the airport.” What about the effects on the local area?“The Preferred Masterplan will result in the loss of an estimated 761 homes,” says Heathrow. Most of the village of Harmondsworth will be demolished, with 260 of the 400 existing homes going, together with Harmondsworth Primary School.The northern part of the village will be retained, including the historic core. The plan envisages this will be turned into a tourist attraction: Harmondsworth Country Park, described as: “A new community facility focused on the Great Barn and St Mary’s Church, with additional opportunities for beneficial use of residential historic buildings and the conservation area in Harmondsworth.”The villages of Longford and Sipson will also be hit. Three areas of community allotments will be displaced as a direct result of the expansion. These are The Vineries allotments in Stanwell Moor, Moor Lane allotments in Harmondsworth and Pinglestone allotments in Sipson.But in return, “a number of biodiversity ponds will be provided”. In addition grassland will become a Carbon Sink Meadow. And a Green Loop will encircle the airport, providing “connectivity between settlements, public rights of way and landscaped areas around the airport.” How much will it cost, and who will pay?The airport has reduced the stated cost of expansion, from £16.5bn to £14bn, though this figure is challenged by some who say that the actual price-tag will be higher – and is concealed on the pretext that investments would have been made anyway. The figure includes the cost of diverting the M25 and A4.The local property magnate, Surinder Arora, who believes he can deliver the project for less, says: “ We fail to see how they can stay within their £14bn budget or deliver it on time. “It’s too elaborate, almost like they want to build an entire city at the airport rather than focus on the passenger.”Heathrow Hub, which favours an extended northern runway but lost out in the selection process to Heathrow, calls the expansion “the ultimate £30bn unicorn” and saying the costs are “spiralling out of control”.Ultimately the passenger will pay, through charges levied by the airport which in turn are passed on by the airlines. Heathrow and the transport secretary say only that charges will be “as close as possible” to 2016 levels. Won’t it trash the environment?The key challenges are global – meeting targets on carbon emissions – and local, specifically on air quality and noise. High Court challenges by environmentalists were thrown out earlier this year. Heathrow airport and the Department for Transport believe that emissions targets can be met with technological advances. Emma Gilthorpe, Heathrow’s executive director for expansion, said: “We have been working with partners at the airport, in local communities and in government to ensure our plans show how we can grow sustainably and responsibly – with environmental considerations at the heart of expansion.”The government: “The scheme is the right choice on economic and strategic grounds regardless of the future regime to deal with emissions from international aviation”.It is promising “a world-class package of compensation and mitigation measures to support those affected by the expansion, with up to £2.6bn for compensation, noise insulation and community amenities".But many environmental groups say the expansion is unsustainable. John Stewart, the chair of HACAN, the campaign group which opposes a third runway, said: “The impact on local people could be severe for many years to come. Disruption from construction; the demolition of homes; the reality of more than 700 extra planes a day.”Boris Johnson, MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip – near Heathrow – pledged in 2015 to prevent the third runway going ahead.He said: “I will lie down with you in front of those bulldozers and stop the building, stop the construction of that third runway.” Are the other candidates for expansion now dead in the water? The Davies Commission, which sat from 2012 to 2015, shortlisted the Heathrow Hub extended runway concept along with a second runway at Gatwick. The commission unanimously chose a third runway at Heathrow, even though the CO2 emissions from this option are higher than from the other two.The government backed the plan, and in 2018 MPs voted to approve the Airports National Policy Statement by 415 to 119.Heathrow Hub is continuing to challenge the decision. Gatwick, which has just reported record passenger numbers of 46.4 million, is planning to bring its standby runway into every day use.“Boris Island”, the Thames Estuary airport proposed by Boris Johnson when he was mayor of London, was flatly rejected by the Davies Commission. But were Mr Johnson to become prime minister he might reopen the concept.Other voices, notably Ryanair’s boss Michael O’Leary, insist new runways are needed at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted. Only by such bold expansion, they argue, will competition flourish and passenger demand be adequately met. What might it mean for travellers in the rest of the UK?Much has been made of the idea of ring-fencing additional slots for domestic links, restoring connections to airports such as Liverpool, Durham Tees Valley and Prestwick.But some say that this would be sub-optimal use of scarce resources, and that in time they would be re-allocated to more lucrative flights. Why not simply expand elsewhere in the UK?In total, Britain has far more runways than its needs. The problem is that airlines expand where they perceive demand to be, and that is in southeast England.While Manchester has developed an impressive mix of European and intercontinental operations, attempts to establish long-haul flights from other UK regional airports have foundered.The Department for Transport says: “The benefits of expanding Heathrow will be felt across the country as there will be more flights around the UK, better connecting Scotland, Northern Ireland, the North and the Southwest to new global markets via London.” Are there other solutions to increasing capacity?Yes, Heathrow could grow substantially without pouring any more concrete. The quickest fix is to open 24 hours a day, as recommended by Paul Griffiths, chief executive of Dubai Airports. He told The Independent that Heathrow should simply abandon the noise curfew. Another low-cost but high-impact technique: “mixed mode”. This means both existing runways at Heathrow handling departures and arrivals simultaneously. It would increase capacity conservatively by 15 per cent.Less controversially, incentivising airlines to use bigger aircraft, and to fill them with more passengers, will meet some of the demand between now and 2026. What happens next? A further 12 weeks of consultation will continue until 13 September 2019, with dozens of local events organised.The results will inform the airport’s “Development Consent Order” application – planning permission – which is expected to be submitted in 2020.

  • 15 best new books to read on your summer holiday
    Style
    The Independent

    15 best new books to read on your summer holiday

    The summer holidays are a great opportunity to catch up with the best fiction.Instead of snatching a quick read on the commute to work you’ve got time to lounge by the pool and read the most compelling books from cover to cover.This year has been a bumper year for novels so there’s plenty of choice.Whether you like gripping page-turners that keep you on the edge of your seat or literary novels that give you something to discuss over the dinner table, there’s something for everyone.Our main stipulations were that the novels should be original, compelling and superbly written – the kind of books you’ll want to recommend to your friends.We’ve chosen a mix of established writers and debut novelists. Kate Atkinson and David Nicholls are two of the UK’s most successful authors and they both have highly-anticipated books out this summer – Big Sky by Atkinson, which continues the story of private investigator Jackson Brodie, and Sweet Sorrow by Nicholls, the account of a boy’s first love affair.Debut novelists are represented by writers like Alex Michaelides, whose The Silent Patient topped The New York Times' bestseller list earlier this year, and Beth O’Leary, who wrote The Flatshare on her train journey to and from work.The subjects covered in this year’s crop of novels are wide-ranging too – from Clare Mackintosh’s thought-provoking story of a couple faced with an impossible choice about their terminally ill child to Elizabeth Gilbert’s vibrant account of showgirl life in 1940s New York.So what are you waiting for? Get your deckchair out, settle back and enjoy these novels. Literary 'Big Sky' by Kate Atkinson, published by Doubleday: £20, AmazonJackson Brodie’s back. Fans have been counting the days to read the fifth in Kate Atkinson’s literary crime series about the tough ex-soldier turned private investigator and Big Sky is well worth the wait. This time round Brodie has moved to a quiet seaside village in the north east, occasionally joined by his tricky teenage son and his ex-partner’s ageing Labrador. But once again he gets drawn into a sinister investigation and old secrets come to the fore. Superbly written and utterly readable, this novel is a delight from start to finish.Buy now 'Sweet Sorrow' by David Nicholls, published by Hodder & Stoughton: £20, AmazonSweet Sorrow is another of this summer’s most eagerly awaited novels. David Nicholls, who recently won a BAFTA for his TV adaptation of the Patrick Melrose novels, made his name with One Day and excels at writing tender, funny books about love and friendship. This coming of age novel tells the story of 16-year-old Charlie Lewis and his love affair with a girl he meets when he reluctantly gets involved in a production of Romeo and Juliet. It’s poignant and insightful but the most affecting scenes focus on Charlie’s relationship with his dad, whose life has imploded in a disastrous way.Buy now 'Machines Like Me' by Ian McEwan, published by Jonathan Cape: £18.99, PenguinFrom the case of a young boy who refuses medical treatment on religious grounds (The Children Act) to the angst of a young couple honeymooning on the Dorset coast (On Chesil Beach), Ian McEwan’s choice of subjects is never predictable. Machines Like Me, his 15th novel, is set in an alternative 1980s London. Charlie, who’s drifting through life and avoiding full-time employment, is in love with Miranda, a clever student with a terrible secret. When Charlie suddenly comes into money he decides to buy Adam, one of the first-ever synthetic humans – and a love triangle begins. Original, and as always with McEwan’s novels, beautifully written.Buy now 'Normal People' by Sally Rooney, published by Faber & Faber: £8.99, Foyles​Sally Rooney’s Normal People has won a host of awards, including both the top prize and fiction book of the year at this year’s British Book Awards, the Costa novel award and Waterstone’s book of the year. The 28-year-old Irish novelist has been described as “a millennial writer with millennial concerns” but readers of all ages will enjoy her story of two college friends who try to stay apart but find they can’t. We can’t wait to see what she does next.Buy now Crime and thrillers 'The Silent Patient' by Alex Michaelides, published by Orion: £12.99, Foyles​Scriptwriter Alex Michaelides was inspired to write his debut novel while he was doing a postgraduate course in psychotherapy and working part-time at a secure psychiatric unit. It’s the tale of Alicia Berenson, a painter who lives with her fashion photographer husband Gabriel on the edge of Hampstead Heath. But when Gabriel returns late one night from a fashion shoot Alicia shoots him dead. Psychotherapist Theo Faber is fascinated by the fact that Alicia has never spoken since the shooting and five years on is determined to discover exactly what happened. A smart, sophisticated psychological thriller.Buy now 'Those People' by Louise Candlish, published by Simon & Schuster: £12.99, Waterstones​Louise Candlish won the crime and thriller book of the year for Our House and her latest novel is equally gripping. Lowland Way in south London is a suburban paradise, with friendly neighbours, convivial chat and children playing in the street on Play Out Sundays. Everything seems perfect till Darren and Jodie move in and cause havoc and upset with their loud music, multiple cars and disruptive building work. A clever, pacy novel that will keep you guessing right until the end.Buy now 'The Sleepwalker' by Joseph Knox, published by Doubleday: £12.99, AmazonFormer bookseller Joseph Knox is an exciting new name in crime fiction. The Sleepwalker is the third of his series about Aidan Watts, a flawed Manchester detective with a complex family background. As the novel opens, Waits is on duty in an abandoned hospital ward, sitting with a dying murderer and hoping he’ll reveal the location of his final victim before he dies. Dark, gritty and compelling, this will have you turning the pages until the early hours of the morning.Buy now 'No Way Out' by Cara Hunter, published by Penguin: £7.99, Wordery​From Brideshead Revisited to Inspector Morse, Oxford is the setting for some remarkable novels. Cara Hunter is the latest novelist to set her books in the city – to striking effect. No Way Out is her third novel about detective inspector Adam Fawley and it’s a cracking read. It’s the Christmas holidays and two children have just been pulled from the wreckage of their home in upmarket north Oxford. The toddler is dead and his elder brother is fighting for his life – but why were they left alone? Switch off your phone and settle down on the sofa. You won’t be able to put this book down until you’ve found out what happened – and who’s responsible.Buy now Popular fiction 'The Garden of Lost and Found' by Harriet Evans, published by Headline: £16.99, Waterstones​In 1919 Liddy Horner discovers her celebrated artist husband, Ned, burning his best-known painting. Known as The Garden of Lost and Found, the picture depicts his two children on an idyllic day, playing in the garden of Nightingale House, the family’s Cotswolds home. Almost a century later, the couple’s granddaughter Juliet is sent the key to Nightingale House out of the blue and starts to unravel the tragic secrets of the past. Harriet Evans’s 11th novel is a spellbinding story, brimming with flowers and paintings, loss and courage.Buy now 'After the End' by Clare Mackintosh, published by Sphere: £12.99, AmazonEx-police officer Clare Mackintosh has won legions of fans for her clever crime novels, I Let You Go, I See You and Let Me Lie. Her new book, After the End, is a radical departure, but just as powerful. Max and Pip are devoted to each other but when their young son Dylan is diagnosed with a brain tumour they face an impossible choice – and they can’t agree. This moving and thought-provoking theme is one that’s close to Mackintosh’s heart. As she explains in a note at the end of the book, in 2006 she and her husband had to decide whether to keep their critically ill son alive or remove his life support.Buy now 'The Flatshare' by Beth O’Leary, published by Quercus: £12.99, Waterstones​Beth O’Leary’s first novel is feel-good fiction at its best. The two protagonists, Tiffy Moore and Leon Twomey, are immensely likeable and the comic situation they find themselves in is entirely believable. Tiffy works in publishing and needs a cheap flat while palliative nurse Leon works nights and needs extra cash. The pair agree to share a one-bed flat, with Tiffy sleeping there at nights and weekends and Leon using it by day. It sounds simple, but with Tiffy’s horrible ex-boyfriend, demanding clients at work, Leon’s wrongly imprisoned brother and the fact that they still haven’t met the situation gets more complicated by the day.Buy now 'Queenie' by Candice Carty-Williams, published by Orion: £12.99, Foyles​Candice Carty-Williams wrote her debut novel after bestselling author Jojo Moyes offered her the use of her rural cottage to finish the book, choosing her from more than 600 applicants. Queenie Jenkins is a young black woman who’s just broken up with her long-term boyfriend, Tom. Her boss at the newspaper where she works doesn’t appreciate her and her family never listens (they’re not interested unless the conversation is about Jesus or water rates). A fresh, funny and at times painful read.Buy now Historical 'The Doll Factory' by Elizabeth Macneal, published by Picador: £12.99, Foyles​It’s astonishing to discover that this accomplished book is Elizabeth Macneal’s debut novel. Macneal is a writer and potter and worked in the City for several years before completing a creative writing MA at the University of East Anglia. Set amid the squalor and chaos of Victorian London, The Doll Factory is the tale of aspiring artist Iris, who becomes a model for Pre-Raphaelite artist Louis Frost on the condition that he teaches her to paint. But she’s also been noticed by Silas Reed, a sinister collector who is obsessed by strange and beautiful things. An atmospheric book that will stay with you long after you’ve finished reading.Buy now 'City of Girls' by Elizabeth Gilbert, published by Bloomsbury: £16.99, Waterstones​Elizabeth Gilbert is best-known for Eat Pray Love, the 2006 memoir that chronicled her journey across Italy, India and Indonesia. In City of Girls, her third novel, she turns her attention to 1940s New York and a rundown, midtown theatre called The Lily. Nineteen-year-old Vivian Morris has dropped out of her sophomore year at Vassar and her despairing parents send her to stay with her unconventional Aunt Peg, who owns The Lily. Once there, Vivian makes firm friends with the showgirls, throws herself into their hedonistic lifestyle and learns some tough lessons. Glamorous and vivid, with fascinating historical detail.Buy now 'Circe' by Madeline Miller, published by Bloomsbury: £8.99, Wordery​Madeline Miller won the Orange prize in 2012 for her first novel, A Song for Achilles and earlier this year Circe, her long-awaited second novel, was one of the six shortlisted contenders for the Women’s Prize for Fiction (previously the Orange Prize). Miller takes the legendary story of Circe, who appeared in ancient Greek texts like Homer’s The Odyssey, and brings it alive for a 21st century audience. A captivating book that races along with verve and panache.Buy now The verdict: Novels to read this summerKate Atkinson never disappoints and Big Sky, her fifth Jackson Brodie novel, is the stand-out read of the summer. It’s a masterclass in brilliant writing and whether you’ve read the earlier books in the series (Case Histories, One Good Turn, When Will There Be Good News? and Started Early, Took My Dog) or not you’ll enjoy it. Our other top reads are David Nicholls’s Sweet Sorrow, a nostalgic coming of age story, and Elizabeth Macneal’s dazzling debut, The Doll Factory.

  • The perfect weekend in LA, a city that 'makes nonsense of history and breaks all the rules'
    Style
    The Telegraph

    The perfect weekend in LA, a city that 'makes nonsense of history and breaks all the rules'

    The English architectural critic and writer Reyner Banham said Los Angeles “makes nonsense of history and breaks all the rules”. There is nowhere like this sprawling, sleazy, exciting and sometimes frustrating town, where the car is king and distances between sights are eye-watering (a rush-hour trip from Venice to downtown can take almost two hours). Here’s how to make the most of any time here.

  • Love Island bosses release statement after viewers express concern for Lucie
    Style
    Cosmo

    Love Island bosses release statement after viewers express concern for Lucie

    Meanwhile, Lucie's mum has said she's got "no worries" about her daughter remaining on the show.

  • Royal Ascot: When is it, the Royal Family's attendance and its history
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    Danielle Stacey

    Royal Ascot: When is it, the Royal Family's attendance and its history

    The Royal Family has a long association with the racecourse.

  • The new Instagram pose you're about to see flooding your timelines
    Style
    Cosmo

    The new Instagram pose you're about to see flooding your timelines

    First we had the bambi, and then the barbie..

  • 10 queer women on how to know if your crush is also into women
    Style
    Cosmo

    10 queer women on how to know if your crush is also into women

    "I casually come out to her and if she immediately reciprocates, that's a good sign."

  • Shop the Duchess of Cambridge's first Royal Ascot 2019 outfit - and three more affordable looks
    Style
    Danielle Fowler

    Shop the Duchess of Cambridge's first Royal Ascot 2019 outfit - and three more affordable looks

    The royal kick-started this year's fashionable proceedings in a lace Elie Saab ensemble.

  • We Can't Stop Watching Michelle Obama Throwing A Ball At Harry Styles
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    Elle

    We Can't Stop Watching Michelle Obama Throwing A Ball At Harry Styles

    The former First Lady does not hold back

  • The podcasts you should listen to on your commute
    Style
    Red

    The podcasts you should listen to on your commute

    Travelling to work has never been so enjoyable

  • Choosing the right type of paint when decorating a room
    Style
    House Beautiful

    Choosing the right type of paint when decorating a room

    Primer, undercoat, gloss, emulsion, clay and chalk explained.

  • British holidaymakers warned to protect themselves against West Nile virus
    Style
    The Independent

    British holidaymakers warned to protect themselves against West Nile virus

    British holidaymakers to Greece have been warned to protect themselves against West Nile virus this summer.West Nile virus is a rare mosquito-borne infection that can be fatal. In 2018, there were more than 300 cases of the virus in Greece, reports the UK Foreign Office (FCO). The number marked a steep uptick on previous years.According to the World Health Organisation, the spike in 2018 cases was due to the early start of the transmission season, brought on by high temperatures and extended rainy spells, which was an ideal breeding ground for the infection.According to the FCO, tourists should take preventative measures including minimising exposure to mosquitoes, using repellent when outside and closing doors and windows.The West Nile season typically runs from mid-June until November, according to the UK’s National Travel Health Network and Centre.Most people infected with West Nile are symtom-free, although a small number will develop symptoms including a fever, headache, tiredness, body aches, nausea and skin rash. There is no vaccine and travellers should take preventative measures to avoid being bitten.“There have been enough cases to know that this is now a public health issue,” Danai Pervanidou, from national public health organisation Keelpno, told The Guardian. “The virus has established itself in Greece through migratory birds and we are recommending that everyone takes personal protective measures such as wearing long sleeves, avoiding places with stagnant water and using mosquito nets and repellent.”Last year, alongside Greece, European countries including Italy, Romania, Hungary and Serbia reported cases of West Nile.British tourists make more than three million visits to Greece each year.

  • How to avoid long border control queues at the airport
    Style
    Cosmo

    How to avoid long border control queues at the airport

    Avoid being hungover, for starters

  • What type of baby name to choose, based on its star sign
    Style
    Cosmo

    What type of baby name to choose, based on its star sign

    Your future baby's name could be ~written in the stars~.

  • British Airways' parent company signals intent to buy 200 Boeing 737 Max
    Style
    The Independent

    British Airways' parent company signals intent to buy 200 Boeing 737 Max

    While hundreds of Boeing 737 Max jets languish on the ground, British Airways’ parent company has signed a letter of intent for 200 of the aircraft.The planemaker’s latest short-haul jet has been grounded since March following two fatal crashes. A total of 346 people died when Boeing 737 Max jets belonging to Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashed shortly after take-off.In both cases, an anti-stall system known as MCAS forced the nose of the aircraft downwards despite the pilots’ best efforts to fight it.Boeing is working on software and training updates, but at present there is no certainty about when the plane may fly again.At the Paris Air Show this week, British Airways’ parent company, IAG, said it wanted to buy 200 of the planes.Subject to a commercial contract, the mix of 737 Max 8 and 737 Max 10 aircraft would be delivered between 2023 and 2027.IAG said: “It is anticipated that the aircraft would be used by a number of the Group’s airlines including Vueling, Level plus British Airways at London Gatwick airport.”At present BA flies no short-haul Boeing aircraft. The fleet at Gatwick and Heathrow is all Airbus A320 series.Willie Walsh, IAG’s chief executive, said: “We’re very pleased to sign this letter of intent with Boeing and are certain that these aircraft will be a great addition to IAG’s short-haul fleet.“We have every confidence in Boeing and expect that the aircraft will make a successful return to service in the coming months having received approval from the regulators.”The biggest operators of the 737 Max in the UK are Tui Airways, Norwegian and Ryanair.