Royal chef settles scone debate and reveals whether Queen has cream or jam first

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·Contributor, Yahoo Life UK
·2-min read
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Watch now: How to correctly eat a scone

The Queen has probably sampled more cream teas than any of us. So when it comes to the big question of jam or cream first you would imagine her is the definitive answer.

And now her head chef Chris Tombling has revealed that at Buckingham Palace the cream is always smeared onto the scone first, followed by a good dollop of jam.

Ahead of the Queen's Platinum Jubilee celebrations next week, Philip Schofield and Holly Willoughby presented ITV's This Morning live from Buckingham Palace.

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The Queen is said to be particular about her scones. (Getty Images)
The Queen is said to be particular about her scones. (Getty Images)

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TV chef Phil Vickery was given a tour of the Palace kitchens by Tombling who then prepared some delicious scones ahead of a garden party - and confirmed that the cream most definitely comes first.

Speaking to Vickery afterwards, Willoughby said: "The big question is, 'Has the controversial cream tea debate been settled?'"

"I've got to sit on the fence here, said Vickery. "Chris showed me that way and because we are here that is the way it is done."

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The cream first choice is a traditional Devonshire cream tea, whereas jam first is favoured in Cornwall.

And Schofield, who grew up in Cornwall, revealed he had even asked at the Palace if he could have a scone with the jam first and was told very politely that that was 'not the Buckingham Palace way.'

Chef Tombling also told Vickery that not only does the Queen enjoy jam on her scones - made from fruit from the grounds of Balmoral - but also honey produced by the bees kept at Buckingham Palace.

But whichever way the Queen takes her scones, this age-old debate is set to rumble on.

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