Nude model goes out covered in nothing but blue body paint at Chelsea Flower Show

Francesca Specter
Yahoo Style UK deputy editor
Model Alexandra Ford posed nude at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. [Photo: Getty]

The annual RHS Chelsea Flower Show is traditionally all about just that: flowers.

But one woman threw a curveball yesterday, appearing at the London-based event totally nude aside from body paint and tactically-placed appliqué patches.

Model and actress Alexandra Ford debuted the daring look during yesterday’s press day.

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The look was created by makeup artist Vanessa Davis, who shared a video detailing the process behind it.

It was intended to make Ford look just like an ornament by British heritage ceramics brand – and the show’s sponsor – Wedgwood.

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Wedgwood, which produces fine china, porcelain, and luxury accessories, was founded in 1759. It has partnered with the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) for the last three years as a headline sponsor.

Ford’s body paint is a shade known as “Wedgwood blue” which is a shade traditionally associated with the brand.

While it is unknown how people responded at the event, Davis’ human artwork prompted a positive response from her Instagram followers.

One wrote, “This is amazing. She really looks like Wedgwood china personified,” while another added, “I can only imagine the time it takes to make all the little details let alone put them all on.”

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Body paint can sometimes create a deceiving optical illusion. This was true in a viral photo shared earlier this year.

Artist Jen Seidal shared how she painted a “T-shirt and jeans” on to her son’s body – hiding the fact he was completely naked but for a pair of boxers.

Also in attendance at yesterday’s press day event at the RHS Chelsea Flower show was Queen Elizabeth, accompanied by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

She was there to see the garden designed by the Duchess of Cambridge in collaboration with landscape architects Andrée Davies and Adam White.