A third of young people 'struggling' to emotionally support partners during lockdown

Caroline Allen
·Contributor
·2-min read
Lockdown hasn't been easy on young couples. (Getty Images)
Lockdown hasn't been easy on young couples. (Getty Images)

Most of the world’s population have seen their fair share of changes during the coronavirus lockdown, but according to new research, COVID-19 has taken a particularly emotional toll on couples.

New research by relationship charity, Relate, has found that young couples - specifically - are struggling emotionally with the impact lockdown has had on them.

More than a third of couples aged between 16-34 said they’ve found it a struggle to emotionally support their partners during lockdown, a time where emotions have been typically heightened.

One in four expressed concern about whether or not their relationship would survive when lockdown was over.

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While some couples are navigating whether or not they want to spend their future with their partners, others are dealing with different emotions, namely loneliness and jealousy.

When life returns to “normal” - whatever that will look like in the future - a fifth of young couples said they were worried they’d get jealous about their partner’s lives outside of lockdown.

A third also mentioned that they’d feel lonely without the constant companionship of their loved one when they return back to work and socialising.

It’s not all negative for young couples though.

One in ten people realised that they wanted to spend the rest of their lives with their partners, prompting them to make the decision to propose.

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The proximity to one another has also helped tongue-tied couples to become more open with each other, with 41% of men saying that they feel they can be most honest about difficult topics since the enforced lockdown.

The positivity doesn’t just end with couples, either. Many people are feeling the love for their families, too.

While some people have been bound to the homes they share with their partners or friends, a whole swathe of people have spent the last three months with their families.

Many might think that this was a recipe for disaster, but quite the opposite is true.

45% said they feel emotionally closer to their parents after lockdown - whether that’s because they haven’t been able to see them or because they’ve seen them more.

Another 41% said that it has taken the coronavirus lockdown to help them realise how much their families mean to them.

Let’s hope this wave of positivity continues as restrictions ease.