British people reach peak happiness at 68, research finds

Caroline Allen
Contributor
After an in-depth review, researchers found that 68-year-olds were by far the happiest. [Photo: Getty]

The best days are yet to come. At least, they are for anyone under the age of 68, according to new research.

Jurys Inn studied 2,000 British people of all ages to determine which life factors produce the most happiness.

People in their 20s and 60s are the happiest, with happiness peaking at 68-years-old.

Respondents said they were happiest in their 60s because they “didn’t feel the need to impress anybody anymore” and because they “have more time on their hands”.

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People in their 20s came in a close second. The “fun” of everyday life paired with a “great social life” were the two main contributing factors of their happiness.

There is, however, a period of “midlife misery” to get through before reaching peak happiness, so the research suggests.

64 per cent of Britons surveyed revealed that they found their 30s and 40s the most “stressful time of their lives”.

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Financial pressure plays a big part in this lack of contentment with nearly two thirds of people blaming it for their unhappiness.

Financial pressure wasn’t the only burden to blame, though. People between the ages of 30-50 said that parenting adds a level of complexity to their lives.

Britons also blamed the advancement of their careers for their stress and anxiety levels.

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Contrary to what we’re told about how our younger years are our happiest ones, 9 out of 10 people believed their happiest years were still ahead of them.

Interestingly, the survey also revealed that in order to be at our peak happiness, we need two holidays a year and ten weekends away.

It looks like it’s time to dust off the suitcase in pursuit of peak happiness.

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