The Queen interrupted this important Bridgerton scene

Natalie Cornish
·3-min read
Photo credit: Netflix
Photo credit: Netflix

From Red Online

Bridgerton has become our go-to for a dose of much-needed Netflix escapism during lockdown 3.0, which means we've developed a bit of an obsession with finding out everything there is to know about how the period drama was filmed.

Luckily, there are plenty of fun facts from the set to satisfy our need to know more about the Duke, his spoon and all the goings on until we find out more about season two. These are a few of our favourites:

  • Bridgerton's creator Chris Van Dusen revealed the Queen put time constraints on one of the drama's biggest scenes – where the Duke and Daphne are pleading their case to Queen Charlotte – by asking to use the location, Lancaster House in London, for an event whilst filming was taking place.

  • Three locations were used as the Duke of Hastings' house: Wilton House in Wiltshire, Syon House in Brentford, and Badminton House in Gloucestershire. Queen Charlotte's residence was Wilton House in Wiltshire, which also appeared in The Crown. The royal links don't stop there because Van Dusen also revealed that Bridgerton House was inspired by Princess Diana's real-life childhood home, Althorp in Northamptonshire.


  • 5,000 costumes were made for the first series by a team of 238 people, under the watchful eye of series costume designer Ellen Mirojnick. Daphne Bridgerton had 104 costumes alone.

  • From Ariana Grande's thank u, next to Billie Eilish's Bad Guy, the soundtrack is based on current pop songs, with a Regency twist.

  • Bridgerton is produced by Shonda Rhimes, who also made Grey's Anatomy.


  • Queen Charlotte doesn't appear in Julia Quinn's original books, but Quinn told Town and Country she's a big fan: 'Queen Charlotte is the biggest new character and she's fantastic in every way. I go back and forth between: "Wow, I wish I'd put her in the books." And: "I'm glad I didn't put her in the books because I wouldn't have done her as great as they do her here".'


  • Race isn't touched on in the original books, so Van Dusen and Rhimes made the decision to recruit a diverse cast, in line with the history. 'I think that working with historians, it became very clear that 19th century Regency London was a lot more diverse and a lot more colourful than people thought it to be,' Van Dusen told Collider. In fact, many historians now believe Queen Charlotte had African heritage and was the first biracial member of the royal family.

You can read even more Bridgerton facts over on the Marie Claire website.

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