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Charles Jeffrey

[Photo: Charles Jeffrey]

Charles Jeffrey livens up the stony-faced fashion crowd at LFWM

Charles Jeffrey’s homemade debauchery hit the London catwalk once again. For his first standalone show, the Scottish-born designer gave us yet another insight into his wild LOVERBOY mind.

Looking to Britain’s historical past, Jeffrey’s one and only aim was to make us forget about the recent terror attacks that have rocked the nation.

“As reality becomes more unrecognisable, an absurd satire of itself, the romantic fantasies of our imagination become more real than ever,” he so eloquently put it in the show notes.

Jeffrey’s fantasies played out to the extreme, starting with a powerful interpretive dance that featured scribbled-on dancers and a pink Chinese dragon.

As models burst through the furore, it was easy to see just how distracted Jeffrey’s mind had become. That’s not a criticism. Far from it, in fact.

His mind had altered the country’s past so that Tudor men could walk freely in make-up and suited and booted city men could play around with cross-dressing.

It was hard to untangle the many references that had transformed into brown corduroy pieces, child-like prints and ruffles galore. There were certainly elements of a young Galliano and Vivienne Westwood in the pirate-like characters and overpowering Elizabethan bride who ended the show (a move usually reserved for couture collections).

Everyone is welcome in Charles Jeffrey’s world whether you can’t decide if you’re red or blue or feel like wearing a knitted thong with platform clogs.

This is exactly what the British fashion industry needs. Something playful, something boundary-pushing and something that leaves every person in the room with a smile on their face.

Embrace the weirdness.

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