Advertisement

The 39 best restaurants in Rome

Best restaurants in Rome
Rome has much to offer even the most discerning epicure - CHRISTINE WEHRMEIER

Romans take their food and wine seriously, and you will never be stuck for somewhere to enjoy a good meal in the city. Aside from the ubiquitous takeaway pizza and tramezzini (sandwiches), snack culture is a more recent phenomenon – but it has been spurred on by the recession, and there are now places where you can grab a decent stand-up or carry-out meal for €10 (£8.80). And then, of course, there are the classics, from cacio e pepe to involtini di manzo al sugo (rolled beef in tomato sauce). When you are planning ahead just remember: Romans rarely turn up for dinner before 8pm.

Read on for our experts' pick of the best places to eat right around the city. For further Rome planning inspiration, check out our guides to the city's hotelsnightlife, shopping, attractions and free things to do, plus how to spend a weekend there.


Find a restaurant by area


San Giovanni

Santo Palato

With the soul of a traditional Roman trattoria leavened by a touch of hipster flair, this casual eatery is popular both among the city’s epicurean crowd and those who simply love its straightforward Roman classics taken to the next level. Headed by chef Sara Cicolini, one of the city’s most promising rising stars, the restaurant honors Rome’s storied “quinto quarto” cuisine with an offal-heavy menu; those who are not fans of innards will be more than pleased with perfectly turned out blockbusters such as carbonara and amatriciana. The small wine list includes an interesting choice of natural wines and artisanal beers.

Contact: santopalato.superbexperience.com
Prices: ££
Reservations: Essential

Santo Palato, Rome
Santo Palato is a traditional Roman trattoria with a hipster flair - ALBERTO BLASETTI

North Centro

Antica Birreria Peroni

Roll out the barrel at this vintage Roman-style bierkeller a stone’s throw from the Trevi fountain. Crowds of appreciative locals and tourists pack in to dine on filling carb and meat fare, washed down with draught Peroni. The food, served by hale and hefty waiters, consists of three or four daily-changing pasta dishes, plus sausages, steaks, goulash, grilled scamorza cheese and a few salads. The place stays open all afternoon – handy if you need to eat between 3pm and 7pm when it's hard to find a decent sit-down meal in Rome.

Contact: anticabirreriaperoni.net
Prices: ££
Reservations: Walk-ins only

Antica Birreria Peroni, Rome, Italy
Antica Birreria Peroni is a vintage Roman-style bierkeller

Armando al Pantheon

This friendly and delicious family-run trattoria is within shouting distance of the Pantheon. Its single room has been sympathetically modernised, keeping original details such as the stained-glass vestibule. Roman classics like spaghetti alla carbonara or juicy sweetbreads rub alongside lighter fare (in spring and summer, don't miss the asparagus tagliolini). Unusually for a Roman trattoria, they also have several vegetarian and gluten-free options. The wine list is another revelation, offering a serious panorama of some of Italy's best small- and medium-scale producers, and the mark-ups are reasonable.

Contact: armandoalpantheon.it
Prices: ££
Reservations: Essential

Armando al Pantheon, Rome, Italy
Armando al Pantheon has a modern setting and a classic menu

Da Francesco

In a picturesque cobbled lane not far from Piazza Navona, this elbow-to-elbow trattoria/pizzeria is an institution worth a visit for the atmosphere alone. It’s always full and always loud, especially in summer, when tables spill out onto the pavement. Food is traditional: decent pasta dishes like spaghetti alla carbonara, thin-crust pizza every which way, the usual Roman meaty mains. In 2010, they added a chic upstairs space, with a more refined menu; tables here can and should be booked. Downstairs is also bookable in theory but they have a habit of giving tables away, so try to turn up before 8pm.

Contact: dafrancesco.it
Prices: ££
Reservations: Essential

Da Gino al Parlamento (also known as Dal Cavalier Gino)

A rock amid the shifting sands of the Roman dining scene, the venerable trattoria of Luigi del Grosso, aka Gino, opened in 1963 in this little alley by the parliament and little has changed since then. It’s got the same kitsch murals, the same reliable versions of Roman classics like tonnarelli cacio e pepe (pasta strands with tangy, melting sheep's cheese and black pepper), involtini alla romana (veal rolls wrapped up with sage) and, of course, trippa (tripe). The clientele is more upscale than the rustic ambience would suggest, with plenty of politicians and lobbyists at lunchtime.

Contact: ristoranteparlamento.roma.it
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended

Enoteca Corsi

In the morning and afternoon it's an old-fashioned wine shop, but come lunchtime (and on Thursday and Friday evenings) this bottiglieria, brilliantly placed halfway between Piazza Venezia and the Pantheon, morphs into a packed local trattoria. In a warren of barrel-vaulted rooms, hungry office workers, tourists, local aristocrats and Vatican apparatchiks tuck into dishes like pasta e ceci (a warming soup of pasta and chickpeas) or pollo alla diavola (grilled spicy chicken), washed down with the house white or red (the red’s better). Should you need something a little more serious, there are more than 300 wines by the bottle.

Contact: enotecacorsi.com
Prices: ££
Reservations: Not necessary

Enoteca Corsi, Rome, Italy
Enoteca Corsi is a wine shop by day and a trattoria by night

Gelateria del Teatro

Once the main pilgrim route to the Vatican, Via dei Coronari now leads into gelato temptation. Eternal salvation is no match for Stefano Marcotulli’s inventive flavours including sage and raspberry, ricotta, almond and fig, and 'vecchia Roma' (a gelato version of Roman-Jewish ricotta and wild cherry pie). All ingredients are natural, flavours vary with the seasons, and all the ice cream is made from scratch on-site. There’s a second branch at Lungotevere dei Vallati 25, not far from the Ponte Sisto pedestrian bridge. The owners run Cucina del Teatro next door, a relaxed pizza and pasta takeaway.

Contact: gelateriadelteatro.it
Prices: £
Reservations: Walk-ins only

Gelateria del Teatro, Rome, Italy
Gelateria del Teatro offers tempting, inventive flavours

Ginger

This health-oriented diner is a pleasant place to refuel when the pasta and pizza carbs starts to take their toll. Open all day, it has a panoply of interesting salads (rare in Rome), gourmet sandwiches, fruit platters and smoothies, as well as pasta dishes and mains like grilled red prawns or fillet steak with pumpkin and pistacchios. They do breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea, aperitivo and dinner, and though prices for proper meals are on the high side, most of the dishes (including the appetisers) are intended as mains. What’s more, the place is vegan-friendly.

Contact: ginger.roma.it
Prices: ££
Reservations: Not necessary

Ginger restaurant, Rome, Italy
Ginger is a health-oriented diner for conscious visitors

Il Margutta

On a gallery-packed side street just around the corner from Piazza del Popolo, artsy Il Margutta is that rare Roman find: an upscale vegetarian restaurant. The weekday lunchtime 'Green Brunch’ has 50-plus dishes ranging from soups to pasta, pizza and mountains of fresh organic vegetables, and is one of the best lunch deals in town. The weekend version is more elaborate (and only a little more expensive). There's live jazz at Sunday brunch and sometimes in the evenings too, when the menu is à la carte, the atmosphere a little more romantico, and prices substantially higher.

Contact: ilmargutta.bio
Prices: £/££
Reservations: Recommended (for dinner)

Il Margutta, Rome, Italy
Il Margutta is an upscale vegetarian restaurant

La Campana

The oldest restaurant in the capital, with more than 500 years under its belt. La Campana is the kind of smart Sunday-best place your Roman grandmother might take you. With its staid but timeless trattoria décor and reliable, old-fashioned service, 'The Bell' is a great place to sample refined versions of ultra-traditional Roman dishes such as coda alla vacinara (braised oxtail) and carciofi alla giudia (crispy, deep-fried artichokes). Their tiramisù is legendary. In season, don't miss the vignarola, a traditional Roman spring vegetable stew. Reservations are essential for Sunday lunch.

Address: Vicolo della Campana 18
Contact: 00 39 06 686 7820
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended

La Campana, Rome, Italy
La Campana is Rome's oldest restaurant

Matricianella

A traditional trattoria close to chic piazza San Lorenzo in Lucina, with informal checked-tablecloth ambience but better than usual food and service, Matricianella is the place to try carciofi alla giudia – whole artichokes, deep-fried Roman-Jewish style. Follow with traditional Roman staples like spaghetti all’amatriciana and the excellent saltimbocca (veal rolled up with prosciutto and sage). Featuring around 600 labels, the wine list is a cut above the usual trattoria standard. Reservations recommended for dinner, not necessary for lunch. Tables spill onto the pavement in the summer.

Contact: matricianella.it
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended

Matricianella restaurant, Rome, Italy
Matricianella is a traditional trattoria serving Roman favourites

Nunu

Rome’s international food scene made huge leaps forward during the past few decades, and the city has moved past tired pan-Asian eateries and opened a wave of modern yet authentic regional restaurants of late. This sun-washed Vietnamese bistro just steps from the bustling Termini train station is a perfect example, serving up light and flavorful goi cuon, pho, lao thap cam and other crowd-pleasers for lunch and dinner. End your meal right with a ca phe da iced coffee laced with sweetened condensed milk.

Contact: ristorantenunu.business.site
Prices: £
Reservations: Not necessary


South Centro

Il Pagliaccio

Anthony Genovese is a strong contender for Rome's most talented chef. A major plus point of the serenely welcoming restaurant he presides over is that it's in the heart of the Centro Storico and not attached to a hotel. Genovese has worked in the Far East and on the Amalfi Coast, and there are influences of both in his playful but technically impeccable cuisine. Tortelli filled with anchovies and broad beans arrive on the table – three jaunty little boats on a foamy green sea. To eat here at a (relative) discount, come at lunch, when there's a €75 tasting menu.

Contact: ristoranteilpagliaccio.com
Prices: £££
Reservations: Essential

Per Me – Giulio Terrinoni

Giulio Terrinoni’s den just off Via Giulia wears its Michelin star lightly. In an intimate, warmly minimalist space behind a lovely ivy-draped exterior, Terrinoni's market-fresh Italian cuisine is more about flavour than showmanship. Service is affable yet attentive, the wine list excellent. And this is one of the few restaurants in this league with a real eye on value – especially at lunchtime, when for €44 (£39) a head you can graze on a selection of five snack-sized tappi, such as roast octopus with lime and raspberry, or an oyster with red onion sorbet. In summer, book one of the three cute little tables for two in the ivy-covered lane outside.

Contact: giulioterrinoni.it
Prices: ££/£££
Reservations: Essential

Per Me Giulio Terrinoni, Rome, Italy
Per Me – Giulio Terrinoni hold a Michelin star yet is good value - brambilla_serrani/brambilla_serrani

Cesare al Pellegrino

Romans mourned the closure of Settimio al Pellegrino in 2022, a beloved landmark trattoria near Campo de’ Fiori. Luckily, its doors have been opened once again by the husband-and-wife team Leonardo Vignoli and Maria Pia Cicconi behind Cesare al Casaletto, another go-to for lovers of old-school Roman cuisine. Buzz the doorbell to enter and tuck into a revived version of the eatery’s iconic meatballs, plus no-nonsense classics like baccalà alla romana (Roman-style cod) and spaghetti tossed with the leftover sauce from the involtini, just like any frugal nonna romana would serve.

Contact: trattoriadacesare.it/trattoria-da-cesare-al-pellegrino
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended

La Pace del Palato

Renato and Francesco Pesce embody both two different generations and the eternal struggle of Rome itself to strike a delicate balance between tradition and innovation. The city sometimes misses the mark, but the Pesce father-and-son team can do no wrong according to their devoted fans that come from across the city (and across Italy) to sigh in delight over fresh pasta stuffed with taleggio and speck, chicken souffle, and zucchini and truffle flan. The disarmingly friendly atmosphere and carefully curated wine list are just the cherry on the Roman torta.

Contact: lapacedelpalatocatering.com
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended

Roscioli

As Rome's ultimate deli restaurant, Roscioli is all about top notch ingredients. A display case laden with exquisite Italian and foreign delicacies dominates the entrance. It's not just for show: outside of meal times, Roscioli is a shop, and many of the specialities served here can be bought to take away. Simple combinations abound, such as a perfect starter of mozzarella with Cantabrian anchovies, or a classic spaghetti all'amatriciana made with artisanal bacon and pecorino romano cheese. Tables are close together in the brick and bottle-lined interior, and the atmosphere is serious foodie concentration rather than romantic dalliance. The wine list is superb.

Contact: salumeriaroscioli.com
Prices: £££
Reservations: Essential

Roscioli, Rome, Italy
Roscioli is Rome's ultimate deli restaurant

Satiro Vino e Cucina

Traditional Roman fare is so heavy on meat (and offal) that it’s easy to forget that Italy’s capital city sits less than half an hour from the Tyrrenhian coastline. This new Monti eatery is a reminder of the proximity of the sea’s bounty, with creative fish and seafood dishes that channel classic go-tos and culinary trends. Octopus putanesca and cacio e pepe with tuna look to the past while kataifi-encrusted shrimp and a fish tartare of the day keep the menu fresh and contemporary. The ample wine list highlights Italian producers and includes options by the bottle or by the glass.

Contact: satirovinoecucina.it  
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended

Supplizio

Deep-fried rice balls are a staple of Italian street food from Rome all the way south to Sicily. Rome’s twist on this satisfying specialty is called a ‘supplì’, and it’s one of the most ubiquitous and authentic street foods in the capital. Oval-shaped and breaded, classic ‘supplì’ feature rice mixed with a bit of tomato sauce and ground beef or pork packed around a central chunk of mozzarella, which melts as the whole thing is deep-fried. The best ‘supplì’ in town are found at Supplizio, a tiny corner fry shop just a few blocks from the Tiber River in the heart of the ‘centro storico’. In addition to classic ‘supplì’, you can try updated—but still quintessentially Roman—flavors like ‘cacio e pepe’, ‘amatriciana’, and ‘carbonara’. There are a few tables and bar seating, or you can take your piping-hot treasure to go.

Contact: 00 06 8987 1920
Prices: £
Reservations: Walk-ins only


Trastevere

Fatamorgana

With flavours like wasabi, black forest gateau and chocolate infused with lapsang souchong, this mini-chain is one of the city’s more creative ice cream emporiums. But it's also militantly natural and organic. Owner Maria Agnese Spagnuolo uses no additives or artificial colouring agents, and her ice cream is rigorously gluten-free. Flavours change according to seasonal availability. In late summer and autumn, don't miss the uva fragola e zenzero (strawberry grape and ginger). Other central branches are on Piazza dei Zingari in Monti, Via Laurina (off Via del Corso) and Via dei Chiavari in the centro storico.

Contact: gelateriafatamorgana.it
Prices: £
Reservations: Walk-ins only

Fatamorgana, Rome, Italy
The flavours at Fatamorgana change seasonally - prova

Glass Hostaria

It's not easy to find a good place to eat in Trastevere so hats off to Cristina Bowerman's Michelin-starred culinary fiefdom, which strikes a blow for quality and research in an area dominated by tourist trattorias. In this aggressively modern reign of glass and steel,  first timers should opt for one of the tasting menus, which showcase Bowerman's fancy but convincing Mediterranean fusion approach. The ravioli stuffed with Parmesan (which has been aged for five years) and served with a sauce of Isigny butter is legendary.

Contact: glasshostaria.it
Prices: £££
Reservations: Essential

Forno Conti & Co.

Rome’s gritty, multi-cultural Esquilino is quickly becoming the city’s hottest spot for dining and imbibing, and the chic, Nordic-inspired Forno Conti & Co. artisanal bakery is riding the culinary wave. Shelves are stocked each morning with fresh breads, croissants and other simple pastries to enjoy with espresso made from locally roasted Faro-brand coffee, or patrons can dig into something more filling like buns (with butter and jam or cheese and prosciutto) or a soft-boiled egg. Come lunchtime, an array of quiches, baguette sandwiches and savory pies appear, alongside a selection of organic sodas and juices and natural wines.

Contact: fornoconti.co 
Prices: £
Reservations: Not necessary


Flaminio

All'Oro

Riccardo Di Giacinto and his wife Ramona’s Michelin-starrred restaurant occupies an Art Nouveau villa just a five-minute walk from Piazza del Popolo. The interior has a nightclubby aesthetic, while for fine weather there is an airy veranda. Di Giacinto is a master of culinary camouflage, favouring inventive tweaks to Roman tradition – a signature dish is coda alla vaccinara (oxtail) disguised as Ferrero Rocher. Tasting menus (one vegan) offer substantial savings on à la carte prices; newcomers are advised to try the All'Origine menu, a compilation of the chef's 'greatest hits'. Upstairs, 14-room H’All is a fresh design hotel.

Contact: ristorantealloro.it
Prices: £££
Reservations: Recommended

Neve di Latte

Right behind Zaha Hadid’s angular MAXXI is a less showy masterpiece. This 'Slow Food' style gelateria does a few fancy flavours (like barrel-aged balsamic vinegar – unmissable), but is more focused on perfecting classics like chocolate or hazelnut. Few ice cream makers use such maniacally sourced ingredients; we're talking Bavarian biodynamic milk, eggs from free-range Tuscan hens fed partly on goat milk, and four different varieties of organic brown sugar for starters. The shop’s spacious interior is pared back, with stools for perching (all the better to focus on the ice cream).

Contact: facebook.com/NevedilatteRomaFlaminio
Prices: £
Reservations: Walk-ins only

Neve di Latte, Rome, Italy
Neve di Latte is a 'Slow Food'-style gelateria - Enrico Di Giamberardino

Prati

Del Frate

This attractive urban-chic wine bar near the Vatican has been in the Del Frate family for almost a century, and is a great spot to recover energies after a visit to the Sistine Chapel. Little cherrywood tables laid out between exposed brick walls and towering wine racks make it more suited to a tête-à-tête than a big group. The menu is lighter than the Roman norm, split between cold deli plates like beef tartare with ginger, and four or five daily hot primi and secondi. The wine list is spectacular, including a good by-the-glass selection.

Contact: enotecadelfrate.it
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended

La Pratolina

This buzzing, loud and cheerful evening-only pizzeria is just the thing after a long day at the Vatican. Their oval pinsa apparently derives from an ancient Roman style of focaccia. It’s not just the special flour mix, the slow, temperature-controlled dough rising time and the lavastone, wood-fired oven that this heritage pizza stand out from the crowd. It’s the toppings as well – like the mozzarella, pesto, Pachino tomatoes and Parma ham that adorn the Genovese. There are some good wines and beers on the list, plus a few decent salads if you're not in a doughy mood.

Contact: pizzerialapratolina.it
Prices: £
Reservations: Essential

Passaguai

After a visit to the Vatican head for Passaguai and its nearby sister wine bar Sorpasso. Both are Prati guarantees for a light meal at a good price, and are open throughout the day. Both locations offer a bit of everything, from salads and cold cuts to pasta dishes, risottos, steaks and yummy desserts. Passaguai’s interior is a cosy cellar: windowless, but warm in winter and cool in summer, and there are pavement tables outside.

Contact: passaguai.it
Prices: £
Reservations: Recommended

L’Arcangelo

This Prati restaurant, with its retro wood-panelled décor, was one of the first in Rome to take the fresh-and-local trattoria formula and give it a Cordon Bleu twist. To sample what they do best, order the rigatoni alla carbonara – a classic Roman trattoria dish, given wings by the quality of the ingredients and the perfection of the technique. At the end of the meal they offer free, homemade Vov – a zabaglione liqueur – with sweet biscuits for dipping. Well spaced tables and unobtrusive service make this a pleasant spot for a romantic tête-à-tête.

Contact: larcangelo.com
Prices: £££
Reservations: Recommended

L’Arcangelo, Rome, Italy
L’Arcangelo has retro wood-panelled décor and a classic Roman menu

Pulejo

Experimental contemporary dining has swept over Italy’s capital, with varying levels of success. Many of these Michelin-aspiring restaurants confound diners with their overly fussy—yet often bland—concoctions, but Pulejo stands apart for creative plates that simultaneously surprise and soothe. Chef Davide Puleio earned his stripes at celebrity outposts like Noma in Copenhagen before opening his namesake restaurant near the Vatican in 2022, and diners looking for Michelin heft with the familiar flavors of a corner trattoria have been flocking to his haute-cuisine outpost every since to enjoy traditional Roman animelle (sweetbreads) updated with smoked oyster sauce and chard or tortello pasta stuffed with wild boar, rhubarb and toasted pine nuts.

Contact: pulejo.it
Prices: £££
Reservations: Essential

Pulejo, Rome
Pulejo stands out from other top restaurants in Rome

Bonci

Rome's best takeaway pizza is served up at this tiny outlet (with no seating) not far from the entrance to the Vatican Museums. Bear-like dough maestro Gabriele Bonci has been called 'the Michelangelo of pizza', and his slow-rise product – made from specially selected organic flours – ranges from tried-and-tested classics like margherita (tomato and mozzarella) to Bonci creations like ricotta, black pepper and courgettes, or vignarola (his pizza version of a Roman spring soup). Avoid the peak lunchtime rush by arriving early or late. If you’re planning a picnic, pick up some of Bonci’s delicious bread.

Contact: bonci.it
Prices: £
Reservations: Walk-ins only


Aventine

Torcè

Claudio Torcè’s divine ice creams are among the best in Rome. There are eight different chocolate flavours alone, plus savoury forays like gorgonzola. The Torcè HQ is in the suburb of EUR, just a three-minute walk from the Laurentina stop at the end of the B line. However their tiny Viale Aventino shop is more central – just a five-minute walk from the Via di San Gregorio entrance of the Forum and Palatine hill, and eight minutes from the Colosseum. But rest assured: all the ices come direct from the Torcè mothership.

Contact: gelateriatorce.it
Prices: £
Reservations: Walk-ins only


Gianicolo

Antico Arco

It’s been going for almost 20 years now, but this relaxed, contemporary Italian restaurant on the Gianicolo hill above Trastevere continues to deliver. The interior is warmly minimalist; the very few outside tables – a novelty in the recently pedestrianised piazza – should be booked well ahead. Risotto with Castelmagno cheese in Nebbiolo sauce is an Antico Arco classic; meat, fish and game share the credits, and there are even a few veggie dishes. The sommelier is a great source of inspiration – and the mark-ups on bottles are reasonable.

Contact: anticoarco.it
Prices: £££
Reservations: Essential

antico arco resturant rome
Antico Arco is a contemporary Italian restaurant with minimalist decor

Trionfale

Romanè

Chef Stefano Callegari has been a pillar of the Roman dining scene for decades, best known for his innovative pizzas and invention of the ‘Trapizzino’, a now ubiquitous Roman street food. In 2021, he opened his first trattoria in the Trionfale district just north of the Vatican to champion timeless Roman specialties from artichokes to offal. Diners are treated to faithful versions of carbonara and amatriciana, meatballs stewed in tomato sauce, and chicken alla cacciatora, plus get a souvenir hand-painted ceramic dish to take home (only included with some menù items).

Contact: romaneviacipro106.it
Prices: £
Reservations: Recommended


Ostiense

Marigold

Italian-Danish couple Domenico Cortese and Sofie Wochner had long been a fixture on Rome’s foodie scene with their pop-up restaurant, The Eatery, before opening this delightful brick-and-mortar restaurant and micro bakery that captures their unique blend of Italian warmth and Danish style. Though the restaurant serves lunch and dinner, their breakfast and brunch menu – the only of its kind in the city – is the biggest draw. Tuck into avocado toast on fresh rye bread, warm cinnamon twists or sourdough toast with homemade butter. Be sure to choose a few goodies from the bakery case to take away, including cookies, cakes and scones.

Contact: marigoldroma.com
Prices: ££
Reservations: Recommended; walk-ins only for brunch on Saturday and Sunday

Marigold, Rome
Marigold blends Italian warmth with Danish style

Nomentana

Marzapane

This creative bistrot, close to the Macro contemporary art gallery, has an attractive interior in warm wood and terracotta, with an open-to-view kitchen that makes for a mesmerising show. The culinary remit is to offer gourmet cuisine at trattoria prices. Tasting menus start at just €30 (£27) for the five-course lunchtime meat or fish options, rising to the €75 (£66)  'Alba' blowout – remarkable value given the bravura of Spanish chef Alba Esteva Ruiz, whose Mediterranean fusion approach is well illustrated in a starter of quail escabeche with figs and walnuts in which Arabic, Iberian and Italian peasant traditions mix.

Contact: marzapaneroma.com
Prices: ££/£££
Reservations: Recommended

Marzapane, Rome
Marzapane is a creative bistrot with an open kitchen

Testaccio

Da Felice

The heirs of old-school neighbourhood restaurateur Felice have turned this place into one of Rome's most buzzy trattorias. The exposed-brick décor may be new but the food is still downhome romano, centred on classics like spaghetti all'amatriciana or involtini di manzo al sugo (rolled beef in tomato sauce) and some daily-changing specials. Veggies will be pretty much limited to the tonnarelli cacio e pepe (pasta strands with sheep's cheese and black pepper), but it's no sacrifice - they're among the best in town. Service is brisk but professional, and the wine list surprisingly extensive for a family-run trattoria.

Contact: feliceatestaccio.com
Prices: ££
Reservations: Essential

Da Felice Rome restaurant, Rome
Da Felice is one of Rome's most buzzy trattorias

Pizzeria Remo

To see a Roman pizzeria at its most enjoyably lively, head for the down-to-earth Testaccio district. Remo serves up good Roman-style flat pizzas on a corner overlooking a small park, with all the classic toppings, to a loud and appreciative audience. Beer, water or soft drinks are the liquids of choice; they do also have wine, but it’s pretty rough. To secure one of the few coveted outside tables you’ll need to come early, or wait your turn, as they don’t take bookings. Service is brisk – this isn’t the place to linger over a romantic supper.

Contact: 00 39 06 574 6270
Prices: £
Reservations: Walk-ins only


Northern Suburbs

La Pergola

Dinner at La Pergola is a must if expense is no object. Rome's only three-starred Michelin establishment pulls out all the stops, and has a spectacular view over the city. Chef Heinz Beck is German but his love of Italian food and work ethic (you'll find him in the kitchen, not on television) have endeared him to local gourmets. He can do theatrical showpieces (as in a mushroom, truffle and foie gras composition he calls 'woodland garden') but is also a master of simplicity. Head sommelier Marco Reitano is an excellent guide to the exhaustive wine list.

Contact: romecavalieri.com
Prices: £££
Reservations: Essential

La Pergola, Rome
La Pergola has been awarded three Michelin stars for good reason - ANTONIO SABA

Western Suburbs

Da Cesare al Casaletto

Take tram 8 to the end of the line to visit this in-the-know trattoria which has been garnering rave reviews since it was turned around by current owner Leonardo Vignoli. Inside is trattoria trad – echoey and brightly lit – but you can book a table on the pretty terrace instead. Try the signature polpette di bollito (meat croquettes in basil sauce), and classics such as abbacchio a scottadito (grilled lamb chops). Food is excellent and good value, and the wine list has some stellar bottles at reasonable mark-ups. There are fish dishes too, and off-menu daily specials rarely disappoint.

Contact: trattoriadacesare.it
Prices: ££
Reservations: Essential

Bar Necci dal 1924 rome restaurant
Da Cesare al Casaletto serves excellent, good value food

How we choose

Every restaurant in this curated list has been tried and tested by our destination expert, who has visited to provide you with their insider perspective. We cover a range of budgets, from neighbourhood favourites to Michelin-starred restaurants – to best suit every type of traveller’s taste – and consider the food, service, best tables, atmosphere and price in our recommendations. We update this list regularly to keep up with the latest opening and provide up to date recommendations.