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UK areas where women work the longest hours per week have been revealed

Data has revealed in which parts of the UK people work the longest and shortest hours. (Getty Images)
Data has revealed in which parts of the UK people work the longest and shortest hours. (Getty Images)

The areas of the UK where women work the longest hours have been revealed by a new study.

Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed that females in full-time roles in three parts of the country clocked the most hours.

These were Northern Ireland, South East England and the West Midlands where women totalled 37.5 a week on average.

However, women working the longest part-time hours – 20 on average – were based in the Northeast, North West, Wales and West Midlands.

Read more: Cost of living crisis – 77% of women are seeking jobs with a higher salary, compared to 59% of men

The findings, which were as a result of analysis by SEO agency Clickslice, also revealed which men in the country work the longest hours.

Northern Irish males in full-time jobs also work the longest hours in the UK – at 39.3 hours a week – followed by the East Midlands (39.1 hours) and the East of England (39 hours).

Meanwhile, men clocking the most part-time hours, with an average of 19.4, lived in the Northeast of England.

Men in full-time roles in Northern Ireland work the longest hours per week. (Getty Images)
Men in full-time roles in Northern Ireland work the longest hours per week. (Getty Images)

This was followed by part-time male workers in the West Midlands, where they clocked up 19.3 hours per week on average.

It comes after ONS data also previously showed that just a handful of professions have been well-cushioned amid the cost of living crisis which has seen people take on more hours.

Those in legal services, management, engineering and scientific research jobs have seen their pay sit above inflation since 2018.

Read more: UK areas with most improved rates of happiness, anxiety and life satisfaction revealed

Additionally, a report recently found that 77 per cent of women are seeking jobs with a higher salary compared to just 59 per cent of men.

The research found that costs were being particularly squeezed as families had to fork out more than two-thirds of their salaries on childcare.

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