Sir Mick Jagger hints at 2022 Rolling Stones gigs

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Mick Jagger hints at 2022 Rolling Stones gigs credit:Bang Showbiz
Mick Jagger hints at 2022 Rolling Stones gigs credit:Bang Showbiz

Sir Mick Jagger says The Rolling Stones will tour next year if "everyone" is feeling up for it.

The 'Gimme Shelter' rockers are currently completing their rescheduled 'No Filter' US tour dates, their first run without late drummer Charlie Watts, who was replaced by Steve Jordan.

And the 78-year-old frontman expects he and his bandmates - also including Keith Richards, 77, and 74-year-old Ronnie Wood - will keep performing live while they are all fit and well and enjoying being on the road.

Speaking to the new issue of Mojo magazine - of which they are the cover stars - Mick said: "If things are good next year and everyone's feeling good about touring, I'm sure we'll do shows."

Guitarist Keith admitted he was apprehensive about playing without his right-hand-man, Charlie - who died aged 80 in August - but he and new recruit Steve soon found their groove.

He said of their new sticksman: "I was like, 'I can't pick this up without Charlie.'

"But once Steve and I got into it: 'Hey, this is the way it's supposed to be.'

"From a musical point of view, it's incredibly energetic and wonderfully inspiring.

"Steve is so aware of the seat he's sitting in.

"Steve said to me: 'Charlie played the drums. He didn't hit them.'"

Since the drummer's death, Keith confessed he has started thinking about the end of the iconic group for the first time.

He said: "Charlie Watts was my bed.

"I could lay on there and know that not only would I have a good sleep, but I'd wake up and it'd still be rocking.

"It was something I've had since I was 19. I never doubted it. I never even thought about it. Only now am I thinking about it."

Elsewhere, Mick shared how he could only get Charlie to play heavily if he riled him up.

Mick said: "Charlie brought another sensibility - the jazz touch.

"And he didn't play very heavy.

"Sometimes if I got him mad enough, he would.

"That was the only I could get him to play heavy - get him mad."

And the singer also spoke of the late rocker's pet hate for the showbiz world and doing interviews.

He added: "The thing Charlie and I had from day one was, we would cringe at the crassness of showbiz and its demands.

"Charlie would run a mile rather than do promo."

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting