Would you use a reusable sanitary pad?

(Instagram/hannahpad_australia)
(Instagram/hannahpad_australia)

It’s no secret that the world’s landfills are filled with disposable sanitary products for women. In fact, it’s been said that a single woman can generate between 125 to 150 kilograms of sanitary waste during their menstruation years. Hoping to change this statistic, an Australian company has launched Hannahpad, a cloth sanitary pad that can be washed and reused.

Made in Korea from 100 per cent organic cotton, the Hannahpad claims to be cost-effective, eco-friendly, vegan and sustainable.

Surprisingly, the idea was dreamed up by a guy, Marcus Steve, whose wife Jenny was a flight attendant and felt like she was being overexposed to chemicals due to spending so much time in hotels and on planes. She also suffered from severe period pain and was looking for a natural way to deal with it without adding more chemicals into the mix.

After doing research into commercial pads and tampons, Steve was surprised to find than many exposed women to dioxins, herbicides and insecticides, which can cause infections and rashes.

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The Hannahpad looks a lot like a regular pad, with an external waterproof coating, which helps protect against leaks. It comes in a variety of patterns — in case that’s something you care about — and in an absorbency test, which you can watch on YouTube, it was able to hold up to 130 milliliters of fluid.

“The only challenge some women will bring up is that you have to wash it,” Steve tells the Daily Mail. “We suggest that women wear it like their usually cycle and change it after however many hours wearing it.”

To wash, simply remove and fold it back up and place it in a plastic carry bag to bring home. Steve suggests rinsing them first in cold water, and then soaking them overnight using a micro-organism soap, which they also sell. They can also be thrown in the washing machine after being rinsed.

Is this something you think you would consider trying? Let us know your thoughts by tweeting to @YahooStyleCA.


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