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‘Oatzempic challenge’ helped dieters lose 40 pounds in 2 months, they claim — doctors weigh in

(Left) OatZempic blend. (Right) Dr. Tommy Martin on the Oatzempic trend
On TikTok, the new "Oatzempic" challenge sees weight loss hopefuls drink a blend of oatmeal, water and lime juice in attempt to drop 40 pounds in two month. Dr. Tommy Martin, 32, a internal medicine and pediatrics physician from Massachusetts explains the health pros and cons to the oat-based challenge.

They’re sowing some wild oats — but it’s not what you think.

Those in pursuit of a drop-fat-fast hack, but just can’t seem to get their hands on the ever-modish, ever-costly Ozempic shots are turning to their pantries to craft a DIY diet drink that’s said to trigger oat-of-this-world weight loss result.

TikTokers try losing 40lbs in two months on ‘Oatzempic challenge’ and doc says weight loss is possible Getty Images/iStockphoto
TikTokers try losing 40lbs in two months on ‘Oatzempic challenge’ and doc says weight loss is possible Getty Images/iStockphoto
Those in pursuit of a drop-fat-fast hack, but just can’t seem to get their hands on the ever-modish, ever-costly Ozempic shots are turning to their pantries to craft a DIY diet drink that’s said to trigger oat-of-this-world weight loss result. Getty Images
Those in pursuit of a drop-fat-fast hack, but just can’t seem to get their hands on the ever-modish, ever-costly Ozempic shots are turning to their pantries to craft a DIY diet drink that’s said to trigger oat-of-this-world weight loss result. Getty Images
Renita says her OatZempic regimen has helped her lose four pounds in five days. TikTok/withlove.renita
Renita says her OatZempic regimen has helped her lose four pounds in five days. TikTok/withlove.renita

“[Having] the Oatzempic drink to lose 40 pounds in two months?” exclaimed content creator Rénita while preparing the concoction for TikTok audiences.

“Do I think it’s possible? Yes,” confirmed the brunette — who kicked off her weight loss journey with the cocktail as her tool, weighing in at 176 pounds. She claims she’s since lost four pounds in five days.

“I feel soooo good,” Rénita penned in the caption of her progress post. “Energy level is high, mood is great.”

And digital dieters everywhere are, too, drinking themselves slim — well, sort of.

“Oatzempic,” a cheeky combination of the words “oat” and “Ozempic,” is a hearty mixture of instant oats, water and freshly squeezed lime juice.

Much like weight loss injectables — expensive diabetes drugs that have aided A-listers such as Oprah Winfrey, Elon Musk and nearly every woman of the “Real Housewives” universe — the homemade blend is the pièce de résistance of social media’s new “Oatzempic Challenge.”

The call-to-action encourages folks to consume the drink on a daily basis for about 8 weeks in order to drop several dress sizes.

Whiel the online challenge encourages TikTok users to dringk oats in order to lose 40 pounds in two months, a healthcare expert tells The Post the major loss isn’t likely. Getty Images/iStockphoto
Whiel the online challenge encourages TikTok users to dringk oats in order to lose 40 pounds in two months, a healthcare expert tells The Post the major loss isn’t likely. Getty Images/iStockphoto

But Tommy Martin, an internal medicine and pediatrics physician in Massachusetts, tells The Post that oat chuggers shouldn’t get their hopes for weight loss too high.

“Oatzempic as a trend is something I’m excited about because it’s getting people to eat a very healthy, nutritious breakfast food in a fun way,” said Martin, 32, of oatmeal.

He hailed the grain for its many metabolic effects on diabetics, including its ability to lower A1C, cholesterol, inflammation and blood pressure. But he warned that filling up on the spoonfuls won’t trigger a massive drop on the scale in a few short weeks.

“That a lot of weight to lose,” said the doc. “And unless you go from eating an extremely high-calorie breakfast to this Oatzempic drink, you’ll only see some weight loss but probably not 40 pounds.”

Dr. Tommy Martin says oatmeal can help folks lose weight as well as lower their cholesterol and blood pressure. TikTok/dr.tommymartin
Dr. Tommy Martin says oatmeal can help folks lose weight as well as lower their cholesterol and blood pressure. TikTok/dr.tommymartin

However, Martin says eating — or drinking — a low-calorie breakfast made of oats can place folks in a caloric deficit, prompting their bodies to shed fat quickly. The pro also noted that Oatzempic guzzlers may lose some “non-fat weight” owing to the sips.

“If you’re eating oatmeal and drinking more water, you might move your bowels more frequently,” said Martin. “Pooping more can help you lose some weight.”

The buzzy oat craze is eerily similar to the once-trendy weight loss cookie dough recipe. The Oreo-like formula was virally lauded for “working like Ozempic” by California health coach Aesha Karunakaran in May 2023.

The Beverly Hills belle, who claimed to have lost 15 pounds in 60 days owing to the baked treat, dubbed it “a one-stop weight loss solution” due to its belly-filling benefits.

And nutrition specialists are showering Oatzempic with similar praise.

While preparing her Oatzempic drink, fitness nutritionist Anne shared the internal benefits she’s enjoyed since recently beginning the challenge. TikTok/believeandachievefitbodi
While preparing her Oatzempic drink, fitness nutritionist Anne shared the internal benefits she’s enjoyed since recently beginning the challenge. TikTok/believeandachievefitbodi

Anne, a virtual fitness coach of 15 years who’s recently joined in on the drink challenge fun, has been “pleasantly surprised” by her results.

“Does it work? Yes,” said the blonde in a TikTok clip dedicated to her personal results after six days sucking down the stuff.

“[Is my] appetite suppressed? Absolutely,” she added. “I wasn’t hungry all day long…It makes me not hungry and [not] crave things. It’s taking away the blasting, it’s regulating everything in [my digestive system].”

But Martin warns that the drink is no magic bullet — nor is it a serious substitute for the weight loss shots.

“OatZempic doesn’t truthfully compare to Ozempic,” he said. “Oatmeal is just a health food that might help put you into a calorie deficit, Ozempic has multiple mechanisms of action that help people lose weight and live healthier lives.”

For optimal results, Martin advises dieters to swap out processed foods for fruits and veggies, get 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night and commit to strength and cardio fitness training several times a week.

“It’s how people can lose weight in a healthy, sustainable way.”