Morrisons launches 'buy one to give one' sanitary product scheme to help fight period poverty

Laura Hampson
·2-min read
For every Morrisons or Bodyform sanitary product bought, Morrisons will donate one to a local food bank (Getty)
For every Morrisons or Bodyform sanitary product bought, Morrisons will donate one to a local food bank (Getty)

Morrisons has this week launched a new ‘buy one to give one’ scheme which aims to combat period poverty in the UK.

From 3 March until 10 March, for every Morrisons or Bodyform sanitary product bought in one of its supermarkets, Morrisons will donate one to a local food bank or community group.

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The initiative came about after a Plan International UK survey found that one in 10 girls have been unable to afford sanitary products while one in seven have had to ask to borrow sanitary wear from a friend due to affordability issues.

The survey also found that one in ten girls have had to improvise sanitary wear. It also estimated that more than 137,000 children across the UK have missed a day of school due to period poverty.

The deal applies for Morrisons' own brand or Bodyform sanitary products (Morrisons)
The deal applies for Morrisons' own brand or Bodyform sanitary products. (Morrisons)

Sharael Mackay, health buying manager at Morrisons, said in a statement: “Period poverty is a problem for many of the most vulnerable in our communities and sanitary products are essential.

“Working with Bodyform, our 'buy one to give one' offer means that for every product our customers buy, we can ensure we’re helping those who really need it. Our customers have supported food banks throughout the pandemic, and we’re happy to be able to offer this additional support.”

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With the average period lasting around five days per month, it can cost up to £8 a month for tampons and pads – and that’s if you only have one menstruating person in the household.

In January 2020, the government introduced a scheme that saw free period products placed in schools and provided for all learners who needed them - this has continued into 2021.

In November 2020, Scotland became the first country in the world to make period products free for all.

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Watch: How to relieve period pain