'Brave' Meghan Markle defended against those who don't believe she suffered suicidal thoughts

·7-min read

Matt Haig and Professor Kate Williams are among those defending Meghan Markle, following comments from people who don't believe her revelation she had suicidal thoughts during her time as a working royal.

The Duchess of Sussex told Oprah Winfrey that she had “methodical” thoughts about taking her own life.

“You were having suicidal thoughts?” Oprah asked during the two-hour interview, which first aired on US TV on Sunday 7 March.

“Yes. It was very clear and very scary,” Meghan responded. “I just didn’t see a solution.”

She went on to say she was "really ashamed to have to say it at the time" and ashamed to have to admit it to her husband, Prince Harry, particularly as she knew how much loss he had suffered.

“But I knew that if I didn’t say that I would do it... and I just didn’t ― I just didn’t want to be alive anymore. And that was a very clear and real and frightening constant thought.”

Read more: Harry and Meghan reveal Archie's 'hysterical' newest word

Meghan Markle revealed in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that she'd had suicidal thoughts during her time as a working royal. (Image by Harpo Productions/Joe Pugliese via Getty Images)
Meghan Markle revealed in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that she'd had suicidal thoughts during her time as a working royal. (Image by Harpo Productions/Joe Pugliese via Getty Images)

The Duchess went on to say that she sought help from "the institution" but claims she wasn't offered the support she needed, so she is speaking up now about her experiences.

“I share this because there’s so many people who are afraid to voice that they need help. And I know personally how hard it is to not just voice it, but when you voice it to be told no."

After Markle shared her heartbreaking revelations, social media lit up and while there was much support for the Duchess, there were also some who questioned the validity of her claims.

Read more: Five things we found out for the first time from Meghan Markle’s Oprah interview

On Good Morning Britain Piers Morgan queried the Duchess' heartbreaking revelation that she sought help as she considered taking her own life.

"Who did you go to? What did they say to you? I’m sorry, I don’t believe a word she said, Meghan Markle," the breakfast host said. "I wouldn’t believe it if she read me [the] weather report. The fact that she’s fired up this onslaught against our Royal family I think is contemptible."

Co-host Susanna Reid stepped in to defend the Duchess: "Well that’s a pathetic reaction to someone who has expressed those thoughts."

While royal expert Chris Ship also spoke up in response to people questioning the Duchess' claims: "Someone saying they had suicidal thoughts, I don’t think you can say that she was lying at that point. She had these thoughts, pretty serious ones and took them to HR."

Read more: Royals 'had concerns about Archie's skin colour': 5 most explosive claims about Royal Family from Meghan Markle’s Oprah interview

Meanwhile, people, including mental health advocates Matt Haig and Bryony Gordon and TV historian Professor Kate Williams. flocked to Twitter to offer their support to the Duchess against those who dispute her revelation.

Watch: Meghan Markle called Queen as soon as she heard Prince Philip was hospitalised.

Others pointed out the wider impact of dismissing someone's claims of being suicidal.

What are suicidal thoughts?

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), despite the number of people dying by suicide declining in recent years, one person takes their own life every 40 seconds.

Suicidal feelings, according to the mental health charity, Mind, can mean having abstract thoughts about ending your life or feeling that people would be better off without you.

It can also mean thinking about methods of suicide or making clear plans to take your own life.

"If you are feeling suicidal, you might be scared or confused by these feelings," Mind explains. "You may find the feelings overwhelming. But you are not alone. Many people think about suicide at some point in their lifetime."

Mind says those who are feeling suicidal might feel:

  • hopeless, like there is no point in living

  • tearful and overwhelmed by negative thoughts

  • unbearable pain that you can't imagine ending

  • useless, not wanted or not needed by others

  • desperate, as if you have no other choice

  • like everyone would be better off without you

  • cut off from your body or physically numb

  • fascinated by death.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge speaking to Oprah Winfrey. (Photo by Harpo Productions/Joe Pugliese via Getty Images)
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge speaking to Oprah Winfrey. (Photo by Harpo Productions/Joe Pugliese via Getty Images)

How to help someone who might be having suicidal thoughts

If you or anyone you know is having suicidal thoughts the NHS advises you first talk to someone you trust.

- Calling a GP and asking for an emergency appointment

- Calling 111 out of hours – they will help you find the support and help you

- Contacting your mental health crisis team – if you have one.

See Samaritans' tips on how to start a difficult conversation. Rethink also has advice on how to support someone who is having suicidal thoughts.

For further help and information:

CALM's helpline and webchat are open from 5pm until midnight, 365 days a year. Call CALM on 0800 58 58 58 or chat to their trained helpline staff online, it’s free, anonymous and confidential.

You can also contact Samaritans free on 116 123 or view other ways to get in touch with the charity.

Or for more information about mental health and how to get help visit Mind.

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