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McFly snubbed chance to enter Eurovision 10 years ago: ‘It wasn’t right for us!’

McFly rejected the chance to enter Eurovision a decade ago credit:Bang Showbiz
McFly rejected the chance to enter Eurovision a decade ago credit:Bang Showbiz

McFly rejected the chance to enter Eurovision a decade ago.

Bandmates Harry Judd, Danny Jones and Tom Fletcher, all 37, and Dougie Poynter, 35, said despite being asked to join the contest they didn’t think it was the right fit, but added they would “never say never” about another go as they feel it’s a great launching pad for new artists.

Harry told Metro.co.uk: “We were actually really pursued (for Eurovision) about 10 years ago. But it wasn’t right for us.”

He added he felt the contest is better suited to “new artists” waiting “to be discovered”, but insisted: “It’s a great platform, you get seen by European countries – I guess never say never.”

The group are gearing up to release new album ‘Power to Play’ and Dougie said their producer called their ideas “boring” before making them write with “everything we loved about our band” in mind.

He said about what they ended up focusing on: 'It was live shows, the fact we don't take ourselves too seriously, guitar solos, air drumming, loads of fun live s***. We took it from there.”

Harry added their days of touring now are very different from the 200s as they will be taking their kids on the road.

The dad-of-three said: “They’re entering that age where they’ll come on the bus a bit.

“It would be a dream for me to play alongside my kids. It’s hair at the back of your neck excitement.”

Harry also said playing live gave the group “some of the best times” he thinks he will “ever have”.

And he recalled “fever dream”-style high points for the four-piece included the time they “jammed” with Queen guitarist Brian May.

The band have already released their new single ‘God of Rock and Roll’ and they are set to tour from autumn.

They also already have their eye on the distant future, joking their days on the road could end in the same way as Abba, who have used holographic technology to stage a comeback.

Dougie said: “The Abba show – that’s where it’s heading. We’ve maybe got another 10 years left before it’s AI!”