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Lydia Tár, Jeff Goldblum and Prince: Who Are ES Magazine’s Menswear Style Icons?

Christian Soria and ES Magazine (Christian Soria and ES Magazine)
Christian Soria and ES Magazine (Christian Soria and ES Magazine)

After watching Todd Field’s Tár for the first time a few months ago, I have been – for want of a better word – obsessed with the style of fictional musical polymath Lydia Tár, brought to life by Cate Blanchett (who justly received an Academy Award nomination for the role). As the film’s costume designer Bina Daigeler tells me: “A significant part of Tár’s wardrobe was made in my workroom. We set up a closet for Lydia and everyday Cate and I would decide what the right costume was for each scene, depending on our feeling towards that particular situation.”

Cate Blanchett in Tar (AP)
Cate Blanchett in Tar (AP)

As the film explores themes of gender and power – lest we forget “I am Petra’s father”, a scripted line that Ms. Tár delivers in perfect German when introducing herself to her daughter’s school bully – so do the clothes that she wears. “I was inspired by photographs of women supposedly in a man’s world, such as Annie Leibovitz, and also images of well-dressed men wearing bespoke tailoring in fashion and movies from the ‘60s to the present day,” Daigeler continues.

Said suiting is often paired with a New York Rangers cap for when Tár is travelling under the radar in a blacked out Mercedes; cashmere Studio Nicholson knits are loosely knotted over her starched button down shirts; minimalist pieces from Lemaire, Max Mara and Dries Van Noten frequently appear in her wardrobe; an impeccably austere black Diana coat by The Row lends itself to her imposing nature.

A vintage gold Rolex with a leather strap, is worn with its face on the inner part of the conductor’s wrist. “This was inspired by real life conductors who wear their watch face inwards, so as not to catch the stage lights and distract the orchestra or audience,” says Daigeler. “A small detail, but so important, and one which makes Lydia Tár even more believable.” Another accessory that furthers the narrative arc of the film is Tár’s red Hermès Birkin, sourced from the vintage and resale e-site, Re-SEE Paris. The briefcase-like bag was reportedly selected by Field himself as a plot device that would nod towards her extra marital affairs.

Feeling curious, and with the ES Magazine menswear issue launching today, I asked seven other members of the team to share who is currently pinned to their own mood boards. From Prince, to Jeff Goldblum and Jenny Shimizu, read on to find out who they chose.

Joanna Taylor, Food and Drink Editor

Jeff Goldblum, James Dean and Jean Reno in Léon: The Professional.”

Jeff Goldblum for ES Magazine (Christian Soria and ES Magazine)
Jeff Goldblum for ES Magazine (Christian Soria and ES Magazine)

Laura Antonia Jordan, Acting Associate Editor

“Hard for me to discern between crushes and style crushes (**those** snaps of Oscar Isaac filming Scenes from a Marriage were both). But I am plumping for Jean-Michel Basquiat. He was a real fashion boy: walked for Comme des Garcons, wore Armani suits and Issey Miyake jackets. But whatever he wore he did with an attitude and flair that was, best of all, totally him”

Jean-Michel Basquiat (Paul Bruinooge/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)
Jean-Michel Basquiat (Paul Bruinooge/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)

Nick Howells, Deputy Chief Sub Editor

“Samuel Beckett: the best fisherman’s roll neck, jacket, shock-hair and craggy-faced combo ever.”

Ped Millichamp, Head of Design

“Prince. His style was seamlessly fluid, transcended gender conformity and embraced individuality. By discarding rockstar stereotypes, Prince embraced bold colours and patterns, flamboyant frills and tasseled high heels to create an androgynous aesthetic.”

Prince (AP)
Prince (AP)

Isobel Van Dyke, Social Editor

“My menswear style icons are mainly historical lesbians like Natalie Clifford Barney, Gluck, and the attendees of Le Monocle, to 1990s legends like Jenny Shimizu.”

Matt Hyrciw, Chief Sub Editor

Virgil Abloh for his mix of influences and ability to combine streetwear with fine tailoring at Louis Vuitton, and working with brands from Ikea to Nike. Variety was his secret weapon.”

Nicole Holcroft Emmess, Picture Editor

Matthew McConaughey as David Wooderson in 1993’s Dazed and Confused, for his pink flared jeans and the packet of cigarettes tucked under his sleeve.”