Linda Gray swaps screen for runway at Kornit Fashion Week

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Linda Gray and Motty Reif at Kornit Fashion Week 2021 in Los Angeles [Kornit] credit:Bang Showbiz
Linda Gray and Motty Reif at Kornit Fashion Week 2021 in Los Angeles [Kornit] credit:Bang Showbiz

Hollywood legend Linda Gray swapped the screen for the runway at Kornit Fashion Week 2021 on Tuesday (02.11.21).

The 'Dallas' star walked in the Shai Shalom show at Exchange LA on the opening night of the fashion event, which is taking place in North America for the first time.

Other celebrities in attendance included Donna Mills, who walked in the Guvanch show, and actress Anne Heche.

Motty Reif, founder of Kornit Fashion Week, told BANG Showbiz: "I’m thrilled to bring such diverse and talented artists from around the world for the first ever Kornit Fashion Week in North America."

The event is committed to an age- and size-inclusive lineup of diverse models from different backgrounds, across its 22 shows.

Reif explained: "For me, fashion is about people, not just clothes. The most important thing for me is changing what the ideal definition of beauty is. I'm inspired by the diversity of the human race especially women and want to show people that beauty is not just one type. People of all ages, shapes, genders, and races are beautiful and should be celebrated.”

Designers showcasing their collections at Kornit Fashion Week include Angelina Jolie’s stylist Jen Rade, Ungaro, Georgine, Kobi Halperin, Guvanch, and Asher Levine.

Levine previously created Lady Gaga's cyborg look during her 2018 'Enigma' residency, Nicki Minaj's bionic Barbie look for her 2019 world tour, Lil Nas X's bodysuit for his 'Call Me By Your Name' music video and Doja Cat's memorable Alien Fish Creature costume for the 2020 MTV VMAs.

Speaking previously about his creations, he said: "I’m so grateful for the opportunity to create iconic pieces, like the one for Doja Cat, because it’s something that audiences can connect with. Children, especially, resonate with these clothes that light up. And I think of this work as almost an educational experience, helping these kids understand my vision for the future of clothing. Because in the end, these children are my future clients; they’re the future bodies I’m going to dress."

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