Kiss star Paul Stanley’s father has died at the age of 101

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Paul Stanley attends an event in New York City in 2018. credit:Bang Showbiz
Paul Stanley attends an event in New York City in 2018. credit:Bang Showbiz

Kiss singer Paul Stanley’s father has died, aged 101.

The band’s co-frontman shared his grief on social media, confirming the passing of his dad William Eisen - who survived the Holocaust - and revealing the “pride” William had for his son’s music career.

The 69-year-old rocker posted on Twitter: “My dad William Eisen has left this earth after 101 years & 7 months. His thirst for knowledge never waned.

“He could speak on virtually any subject. His pride in my accomplishments was heartwarming as was seeing his love of my family. He said he'd always be with me and he will.”

In 2005, Paul gave some insight about growing up with his father and mother Eva in New York City in his autobiography, 'KISS: Behind the Mask'.

He wrote: "My family wasn't that well off. When I was six, my father bought me a bike, which was the only thing that I was given of any value. We weren't affluent, but we survived. There were times when money was very tight. In Manhattan, the four of us lived in a one-bedroom apartment; my parents slept in the living room and my sister and I shared the bedroom."

William spent time in five different Nazi concentration camps before eventually moving to America in the 1950s. His wife Eva - who died in 2012 - also fled the Nazi persecution of Jewish people

Last month, the ‘Crazy Crazy Night’ hitmakers announced their ‘End of the Road’ tour will conclude in 2023. This came after the tour was delayed by the COVID after both Paul and Gene Simmons, 72, tested positive for the virus before a show in Pennsylvania in August, prompting them to delay the current leg of the tour, which began in 2019.

Paul said: “I believe strongly by the beginning of 2023 we will be finished.”

They called the decision to end the string of shows in New York - city the band was founded - as going “full circle".

He added: "It seems only natural to be in New York. That is where the band started, and that was really the background for the band getting together and writing these songs and played loft parties and played clubs starting with an audience of probably 10 people. It seems we should go full circle.”

COVID-10 did not just impact the band as last month, a 53-year-old stage hand working on the tour died after contracting coronavirus.

In a statement, the band denied claims made by three other roadies in Rolling Stone magazine that the backstage working environment did not meet COVID guidelines, saying that they “met, but most often exceeded, federal, state, and local guidelines”.

The statement continued: "Ultimately this is still a global pandemic and there is simply no fool proof way to tour without some element of risk.”

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