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Juan Vicente Perez Mora, world’s oldest man, dead at 114 — secret to longevity a shot of booze every day

The world's oldest man Juan Vicente Perez Mora, who lived through both world wars and the COVID-19 pandemic, tragically passed away at the ripe old age of 114. He would have turned 115 next month.
The world's oldest man Juan Vicente Perez Mora, who lived through both world wars and the COVID-19 pandemic, tragically passed away at the ripe old age of 114. He would have turned 115 next month.

The world’s oldest man Juan Vicente Perez Mora, who lived through both world wars and multiple pandemics, has tragically passed away at the ripe old age of 114. He would have been 115 next month.

The supercentenarian’s death was confirmed by Freddy Bernal, governor of Táchira, Venezuela, where the old-timer lived, according to the Guinness Book Of World Records.

The bereaved politician posted a heartfelt tribute on X, writing: “Our dear Juan Vicente Perez Mora, today with deep sadness and pain we say goodbye to you, to that archetype of a man from Tachira, humble, hard-working, peaceful, enthusiastic about family and tradition.”

Perez chalked up his longevity to hard work, going to bed early and “drinking a glass of aguardiente” [the local firewater],” among other factors. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Perez chalked up his longevity to hard work, going to bed early and “drinking a glass of aguardiente” [the local firewater],” among other factors. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

“My old Don Vicente, we will always remember him for his optimism in life, for faith, hope and that deep love for our state of Táchira,” he added.

Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro also paid homage to the deceased senior, declaring “Juan Vicente Perez Mora has transcended into eternity at 114 years old. I send my hug and condolences to his family and to all the people of El Cobre, Tachira state. May God receive him in his holy glory!”

Perez’s exact cause of death remains unclear.

Born in May 27, 1909, the super senior was confirmed as the world’s oldest man on February 4, 2022 at the ripe old age of 112 years and 253 days old.

He received the baton after Spain’s Saturnino de la Fuente Garcia, who was born on February 11, 1909, passed away on January 18, 2022 at 112 years and 341 days old.

Shortly thereafter the announcement, GBWR subsequently posted a statement commemorating Perez’s incredible milestone. “Juan Vicente has exceptional health and memory,” they wrote. “He loves to be surrounded by family and friends as they tell stories and engage in good conversation. “

The first picture taken of Perez (left) when he was 51-years-old. Guinness World Records
The first picture taken of Perez (left) when he was 51-years-old. Guinness World Records
Juan Vicente Perez Mora poses for a photograph with a portrait of his identification card. NurPhoto via Getty Images
Juan Vicente Perez Mora poses for a photograph with a portrait of his identification card. NurPhoto via Getty Images
Perez poses with his family in the streets of San José de Bolivar, Venezuela, where he lived right before his death. NurPhoto via Getty Images
Perez poses with his family in the streets of San José de Bolivar, Venezuela, where he lived right before his death. NurPhoto via Getty Images

During his long and incredible life, Perez lived through many iconic historic moments, including both World War I and World War II, the Spanish flu pandemic and most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic.

The old timer — who became Venezuela’s first male supercentenarian when he turned 110 in 2019 — also saw the advent of groundbreaking technologies from the radio to the internet and even artificial intelligence.

When he got his first photo ID at 51 years old, the picture was in black and white.

Family was particularly important to Perez, who was married to his wife Ediofina del Rosario García for 60 years until she passed away in 1997.

Perez lived through both world wars and the Spanish flu pandemic. Guinness World Records
Perez lived through both world wars and the Spanish flu pandemic. Guinness World Records

During that time, the couple had eleven children — six sons and five daughters — which has since blossomed over the years into 41 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, and 12 great-great-grandchildren.

Perez chalked up his longevity to hard work, going to bed early and “drinking a glass of aguardiente,” a local distilled spirit, among other factors.