Jennifer Lawrence reveals which Don't Look Up co-star was 'hard' to film with

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Jennifer Lawrence on working with Jonah Hill credit:Bang Showbiz
Jennifer Lawrence on working with Jonah Hill credit:Bang Showbiz

Jennifer Lawrence found it "really, really hard" filming with "comedic master" Jonah Hill.

The pair star alongside each other in Adam McKay's satirical sci-fi flick, 'Don't Look Up' – which tells the story of a comet that is about to destroy Earth – and the 31-year-old actress has admitted it was difficult to control the laughter on set with the 38-year-old comedy star.

In an interview with Vanity Fair, Jennifer recalled how it “was really, really hard filming with Jonah, and just not ruining take after take, laughing.”

Jennifer added how they had “an entire day to him just improv-ing insults at me. It was amazing…[Jonah] and Meryl [Streep] were the only ones who should do that kind of improv.”

She gushed: “I mean, he’s just a comedic master."

Meanwhile, the director recently clarified that 'Don't Look Up' was meant to feature masked crew members.

After filmmaker Ben Kohler posted the scene in question on TikTok with the title “oopsy", McKay revealed it was intentional to document the "strange filming experience" amid the global pandemic.

He tweeted alongside a story from E!: “Good eye!

“We left that blip of the crew in on purpose to commemorate the strange filming experience.”

McKay previously said there were times when the film - which also stars Leonardo DiCaprio - mirrored what was happening in the real world, although the director feels it was about more than the coronavirus crisis.

The 'Vice' filmmaker said: "It was really strange because you've seen the movie and you know the premise – a lot of it is like Covid. Every third day I'm getting texts from our cast and crew going, 'Oh, my God this scene from the movie just happened.'

"I had a moment where I was like, 'Do we need to make this movie?' I picked up the script, and I realised it read in a different way. The movie was never about Covid; it was all about how we've profitised and distorted the means with which we talk to each other and communicate. It was always about social media, careerism and greed."

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