IKEA launches curtains that purify the air in your home

Danielle Fowler
Freelance Writer
IKEA has launched curtains designed to reduce air pollution in the home [Photo: IKEA]

Soon, you’ll be able to combat air pollution in the home with the help of IKEA curtains.

The Swedish furniture giant has launched the ‘Gunrid’ curtain which is coated in a mineral-based surface treatment designed to break down common pollutants.

The curtains work in a similar manner to photosynthesis – the natural process plants use to convert carbon dioxide and water into food – as the curtains are activated by both outdoor and indoor light.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 90% of people worldwide breathe polluted air on a daily basis which results in approximately eight million deaths per year.

The aim of IKEA’s latest project – which took several years to complete – is to help people to learn more about the dangers of pollution.

“Besides enabling people to breathe better air at home, we hope that Gunrid will increase people’s awareness of indoor air pollution – inspiring behavioural changes that contribute to a world of clean air,” Lena Pripp-Kovac, Head of Sustainability at Ikea, explained.

Although the curtains alone are not going to combat the world’s pollution problem, they’re certainly a step in the right direction.

“We work long term for positive change, to enable people to live healthier and more sustainable lives,” Pripp-Kovac added.

The latest product comes a year after Ikea launched the ‘Better Air Now!’ initiative in a bid to reduce air pollution. The Swedish chain has also pledged to become climate positive by 2030 by reducing its climate footprint by 70% on average per product.

The curtains will be available to purchase next year.


Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for non-stop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day. For Twitter updates, follow @YahooStyleUK.

Read more from Yahoo Style UK:

Babies in low-riding prams exposed to 60% more air pollution than adults, study finds

The plants that will improve your sleep

Why are asthma deaths so high for young people in the UK?