Gwyneth Paltrow Tells Hailey Bieber 'Nepotism Babies’ Like Her Have To Work 'Twice As Hard’

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Photo credit: RB/Bauer-Griffin - Getty Images
Photo credit: RB/Bauer-Griffin - Getty Images

Nepotism babies has long been the term used to refer to celebrities who come from affluent or famous homes, but this year the topic has become TikTok's obsession.

Now, Gwyneth Paltrow has spurred further conversation after admitting her belief that Nepotism babies, despite their privileged positions, have to work harder to prove themselves.

While many would argue that such celebrities have more opportunities, thanks to their family background, Paltrow believes celebrity children are not always as advantaged as some might think.

The 49-year-old, whose own parents are Meet the Fockers actor Blythe Danner and the late TV director Bruce Paltrow, said Nepotism babies have to work 'twice as hard' to get their foot in the door because people feel like they 'don't belong'.

She said this while appearing on Hailey Bieber's Who's In My Bathroom? YouTube series.

Photo credit: Daniele Venturelli - Getty Images
Photo credit: Daniele Venturelli - Getty Images

She did, however, acknowledge that children with famous parents can 'unfairly' launch their careers and have opportunities that most could only dream of.

'As the child of someone, you get access other people don't have, so the playing field is not level in that way,' she explained.

'However, I really do feel that once your foot is in the door, which you unfairly got in, then you almost have to work twice as hard and be twice as good because people are ready to pull you down and say "You don't belong there" and "You are only there because of your dad or your mum", or whatever the case may be.'

The Goop founder even gave advice to Nepotism babies, saying: 'It shouldn't limit you because what I believe is that nobody in the world, especially somebody who doesn't know you, should have a negative impact on your path or the decisions that you make.'

Photo credit: TIMOTHY A. CLARY - Getty Images
Photo credit: TIMOTHY A. CLARY - Getty Images

The mother-of-two has taken after her mother and late father, with a successful acting career that saw her win an Oscar for Shakespeare in Love in 1999.

Her lifestyle brand Goop has been in the news lately for supporting reproductive freedom, which is especially pinnacle at a time when women's constitutional rights to abortion have been retracted with the overturn of Roe v Wade.

The latest conversation around the topic of Nepotism babies arose back in February when a Twitter user publicised their surprise revelation that Euphoria's Maude Apatow has famous parents.

'Wait I just found out that the actress that plays Lexie is a nepotism baby, omg her mum is Leslie Mann and her dad is a movie director lol [sic],' the user wrote, and the Tweet was later quoted by 2,543 other users and has received 4,491 likes.

Photo credit: Leon Bennett - Getty Images
Photo credit: Leon Bennett - Getty Images

Other celebs who have shared similar thoughts towards Nepotism babies are Kendall Jenner, who said fame made it 'harder' for her to become a model.

The Kardashians star, who was the highest paid model in 2018, explained that her journey involved hard work during a reunion special of the family's former hit show Keeping Up With The Kardashians.

She said: 'I did everything that I was supposed to do and had to do to get to the position I’m at now as a model. I went to every single casting, ran all over not only New York City but all over Europe trying to get a job and make my way.'

She added: 'I always knew [my platform] was there, but that almost made my job a little bit harder only because people probably didn’t want to hire me because I was on a reality TV show. I definitely worked my way to where I am now.'

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