Grief-stricken mum's warning after 17-month-old daughter died napping in car seat

Words by Olivia Morris. 

Lisa Smith has been heartbroken since she lost her 17-month-old daughter in a tragic accident three years ago, and she’s now issuing a warning to other parents.

On 10 June 2015, the US based mum got a call no parent ever wants to receive – her daughter Mia had died in the care of her childminder after she was left in her car seat napping.

“This was our beautiful little girl. Perfectly healthy in every way,” she told USA’s Today. “But when they came in and told us that she didn’t have any more brain activity, all I did was I turn to the doctor and said, ‘I know.'”

Cause of death

Following an investigation into Mia’s death, it was determined the toddler’s cause of death was due to mechanical or positional asphyxia.

A grief-stricken mother has issued a warning to other parents, not to leave their children in their car seats after her daughter died. [Photo: Getty]

“Positional asphyxia is when the baby’s sleeping position prevents him or her from breathing adequately,” NBC News medical contributor, Dr. Natalie Azar, told the show.

“When a car seat is in the car, it’s reclined at 45 degrees.

“This allows the baby’s head and neck to rest backwards so that it’s not slumped forward and blocking the airway.”

A mother’s warning

Lisa is speaking up in the hopes to warn other parents not to leave their sleeping babies in their car seats.

On June 10, 2015 Lisa Smith got a call no parent ever wants to receive – her daughter Mia had died in the care of her childminder after she was left in her car seat napping. [Photo: Today Show USA] 

“The hardest part is that this was so easily prevented,” she said, trying to hold back her tears. “And we lost our daughter needlessly.

“No family deserves this.”

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