Exam boards say GCSEs and A-levels can be rearranged following Manchester attack

GCSEs and A-levels can be rearranged in light of the Manchester attack [Photo: took a pic via Pexels]
GCSEs and A-levels can be rearranged in light of the Manchester attack [Photo: took a pic via Pexels]

In the wake of the Manchester attack, exam boards have said that schools can rearrange GCSE and A-level exams.

A joint statement from the exam boards explains that it will be up to individual schools to decide whether exams should go ahead.

“Our thoughts go out to everyone affected by last night’s terrible incident in Manchester,” the statement from the Joint Council for Qualifications says.

“GCSE and A-level examinations ‎are taking place today across the UK but, understandably, some students, schools and colleges will have been affected by the bombing.”

The statement goes on to say that no students will be “disadvantaged” by the decision.

“School leaders are best placed to decide if exams should go ahead and, if they decide they are not, exam boards will make sure that no student is disadvantaged,” the statement continues.

“Schools and colleges affected by the bombing should contact the relevant exam boards. Students affected should speak to their teachers.‎”

Exam boards have said schools in Greater Manchester can rearrange GCSEs and A-levels [Photo: Pixabay via Pexels]
Exam boards have said schools in Greater Manchester can rearrange GCSEs and A-levels [Photo: Pixabay via Pexels]

Though the exam boards are not actually postponing any GCSEs or A-levels, they are giving schools discretion over whether their pupils take them, but this only applies to schools in Greater Manchester.

The Joint Council for Qualifications says awarding bodies will look at such decisions on a “case-by-case basis and will ensure that there is fairness across the system”.

They also revealed that there would be some flexibility over start times because Manchester is currently suffering from some transport difficulties following last night’s attack.

“The most important thing is that centres contact their awarding bodies and students contact their teachers for guidance,” says the statement.

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