Emily Ratajkowski shamed, told to 'put on a bra' while protesting Kavanaugh

Yahoo Style UK team
Emily Ratajkowski protests against the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh near Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo: Emily Ratajkowski via Twitter)
Emily Ratajkowski protests against the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh near Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo: Emily Ratajkowski via Twitter)

Words by Hope Schreiber.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh has been accused of sexual assault by three women.

Standing alongside members of the public, and Senators Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., for Thursday’s Cancel Kavanaugh protest outside the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse in Washington, D.C., were a number of stars, including Amy Schumer and Emily Ratajkowski.

Schumer and Ratajkowski were arrested.

The latter, a model and actress, tweeted about her arrest and included a photo of herself at the protest holding a sign that read, “Respect female existence or expect our resistance.”

Similar to how Alyssa Milano was shamed for her outfit at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing last week, Ratajkowski’s clothing, instead of her message, garnered the most attention by Kavanaugh supporters.

From comments like “put on a bra,” surprisingly coming from a woman, and “Sorry I was focused on something else, can you say that again?” it is clear that these vocal supporters not only disrespect female existence but also believe that a woman is something to be objectified and ogled, and cannot be respected if she does not “dress appropriately.”

This is not an argument over whether or not Kavanaugh is guilty of sexual assault; this is an argument that men are still controlling women’s bodies.

From sexist dress codes that mainly target female students, requiring them to dress in a way that won’t distract male students — which may cause female students to miss valuable lessons in the classroom — to denial of abortions and birth control, these are instances of men trying to tell women how they should look and act.

The reference to Ratajkowski’s early work in the misogynistic music video for Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” suggests that perhaps the commenter does not understand the idea of consent.

Ratajkowski agreed to be in the music video; victims of sexual assault did not agree to be sexually assaulted — no matter what they were wearing or how many alcoholic beverages they may have had.

Also, it was 88 degrees on Thursday in Washington, D.C., with 75 percent humidity. Maybe the woman was just hot.


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