All the Chelsea Flower Show winners from the last event ahead of its return this Autumn

·7-min read
Photo credit: Getty Images
Photo credit: Getty Images

The Chelsea Flower Show will finally be back for a live, in-person event this Autumn and the countdown has officially started.

The last show was in 2019, as the 2020 event was cancelled due to the pandemic. Instead, we were treated to the first Virtual Chelsea Flower Show, which has returned this year.

The online events feature a long list of exciting, informative and inspirational talks, showcases and tutorials from the biggest names in gardening.

As well as absorbing all the virtual advice from Peter Beales Roses and admiring a peek in Jo Wiley's garden, we've been taking a look back at the Chelsea Flower Show winners from the last time as we prepare for its return this Autumn.

Each year judges present gold, silver gilt, silver and bronze medals to the gardens at the annual show across the three categories, Show Gardens, Space to Grow Gardens and the Artisan Gardens.

They also hand out prizes for the best garden in each category and also an award for the best construction.

in 2019, 12 gardens picked up a gold medal, while only one bronze medal was awarded.

There was also an award given for plant of the year, which was won by Sedum 'Atlantis'.

Chelsea Flower Show winners: Best show garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

The M&G garden, designed by Andy Sturgeon, was named best show garden at the Chelsea Flower Show 2019.

The garden was a woodland inspired landscape featuring stone platforms and burnt timber sculptures.

Speaking about his vision for the garden, Andy said: 'The dark oak sculptures bring out the fresh green of the woodland plants and hornbeam, that bright green you only get in spring. I wanted to reflect this, as it is the most optimistic time of year.'

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Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

Planting includes two types of tree, hornbeam (carpinus betulus) and Antarctic beech (nothofagus antarctica), Digitalis albiflora, and hostas including 'Devon Green', 'Sum and Substance'. There are different types of Euphorbia, including Euphorbia palustris and Euphorbia ceratocarpa, and primulas including Primula japonica Miller's Crimson and Primula chungensis.

Chelsea Flower Show winners: Best Space to Grow Garden

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

The Facebook: Beyond the Screen garden was designed by Joe Perkins. It's coastal themed and was created with young people in mind.

The central pool had gentle waves with the noise of water lapping against pepples and the Caithness stone ridges creating a calming atmosphere.

Chelsea Flower Show winners: Best Artisan Garden

Photo credit: Tim Sandall
Photo credit: Tim Sandall

The Family Monsters Garden was designed by Alistair Bayford.

Circular in design, hazel and birch trees including betula nigra and betula pendula created a canopy for white foxgloves, Astrantia and Alchemilla.

Chelsea Flower Shows: Gold medal winners

SHOW GARDENS

GOLD: The M&G Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

This woodland garden featured burnt oak timber, styled to resemble rock formations.

GOLD: The Morgan Stanley Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

Designed by Chris Bearshaw, The Morgan Stanley Garden examines how to create a beautiful garden while also being mindful of resources and minimising waste.

GOLD: The Welcome to Yorkshire Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

This garden featured a towpath, meadow and lock gates. Designed by mark Gregory, it was inspired by Yorkshire industrial history.

GOLD: The Resilience Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

Commissioned to celebrate the Forestry Commission's centenary it looked at how woodland can combat climate change and diseases.

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: SPACE TO GROW GARDENS

GOLD: Kampo No Niwa

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle


This garden, inspired by Kampo - a system of Japanese herbal medicine celebrated the health benefits of plants.

GOLD: Viking Cruises: The Art of the Viking Garden

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

Designed by Paul hervey-Brookes the Art of the Viking garden has recreated a multi-layered wetland habitat. The planting was inspired by Norway and natural water meadows.

GOLD: The Montessori Centenary Children’s Garden

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

A garden designed with children in mind and focussing on colour and texture. Designed by Jody Lidgard it featured a bright pink reclaimed shipping container.

GOLD: The CAMFED Garden: Giving Girls in Africa a Space to Grow

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

At the centre was a classroom, surrounded by edible, iron-rich crops - emphasising the importance of education and food that helps children grow. Solar panels were included, powering an underground reservoir that irrigates the planting

GOLD: Facebook: Beyond the Screen

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

A coastal design theme created by Joe Perkins using plants from Scotland, new Zealand, Mexico and New England. Seating was made from recycled yacht sails.

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: ARTISAN GARDENS

GOLD: The High Maintenance Garden For Motor Neurone Disease Association

Photo credit: Tim Sandall
Photo credit: Tim Sandall

A vintage car sat at the centre of this garden surrounded by roses, hostas and geums. The untended nature of the garden, designed by Sue Hayward, highlighted the limitations of a person with Motor Neurone disease.

GOLD: Green Switch

Photo credit: Tim Sandall
Photo credit: Tim Sandall

This Japanese garden had a glass structure in the centre, complete with office space and shower and a roof covered in sedum. There were two waterfalls and a moss covered rock pool surrounded by irises.

GOLD: Family Monsters Garden

Photo credit: Tim Sandall
Photo credit: Tim Sandall

A woodland inspired garden celebrating 150 years of Family Action. Birch and hazel trees were planted on the outside creating a canopy in which underplanting thrives

Chelsea Flower Show winners: Silver-gilt medals

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: SHOW GARDENS

SILVER-GILT: The Wedgwood Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

Foxgloves, ferns and roses came together around a secluded seating structure with water running right through the centre.

SILVER-GILT: The Dubai Majis Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

A contemporary garden with curved beds and Mediterranean planting.

SILVER-GILT: Warner’s Distillery Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

This garden featured a natural stone structure with a green rood. Planting includes juniper, alliums and verbascum.

SILVER-GILT: The Greenfingers Charity garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

A lush green garden, reflected in the planting and the tiling of the main structure. Medlar and birch trees on a balcony offered shelter from the sun.

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: SPACE TO GROW GARDENS

SILVER-GILT: The Roots in Finland Kyro Garden

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

A small city garden inspired by Helsinki with planting straight out of the countryside including lily of the valley, willow and red leaved birch.

SILVER-GILT: The Silent Pool Gin Garden

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

Botanicals all used in the production of gin make up the planting and the swing seat is a nod to a copper still used in the distillation process.

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: ARTISAN GARDENS

SILVER-GILT: Miles Stone: The Kingston Maurward Garden

Photo credit: Tim Sandall
Photo credit: Tim Sandall

A dark, purple planting scheme from chives to acers with a smart woven willow border.

SILVER-GILT: Walker’s Forgotten Quarry Garden

Photo credit: Tim Sandall
Photo credit: Tim Sandall

An abandoned quarry was over taken by nature with rusting structures planted with digitalis, geums and pines.

Chelsea Garden Show winners: Silver medals

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: SHOW GARDENS

SILVER: The Trailfinders ‘Undiscovered Latin America’ Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth


Inspired by the rainforests of south Smerica, the Trailfinders garden featured a Monkey puzzle trees, waterfalls and a striking red bridge.

SILVER: IKEA and Tom Dixon: Gardening Will save the World

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth


Ikea teamed up with designer Tom Dixon for a garden of two parts - underneath was a high tech lab for growing plants and above a lush botanical landscape.

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: SPACE TO GROW GARDENS

SILVER: The Manchester Garden

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

A green space in the middle of an industrial landscape with trees chosen for the hardiness and resistance to climate change.

SILVER: The Harmonious Garden of Life

Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle
Photo credit: Sarah Cuttle

A simple garden designed to be environmentally sustainable. Planting includes a clover lawn which requires less maintenance and watering than a normal lawn.

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: ARTISAN GARDENS

SILVER: The Donkey Sanctuary: Donkey’s Matter

Photo credit: Tim Sandall
Photo credit: Tim Sandall

A terrace of purple and silver drought resistant with a lean to in the centre for a visiting donkey.


Chelsea Flower Show winners: Bronze Medals

CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW: SHOW GARDENS

BRONZE: The Savills and David Harber Garden

Photo credit: Neil Hepworth
Photo credit: Neil Hepworth

A woodland clearing was transplanted to a city garden with buttercups, parsley and long grass adding to the countryside theme.

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