Chanel branded racist for selling a £1,130 boomerang

<i>Chanel’s boomerang has caused outrage [Photo: Chanel]</i>
Chanel’s boomerang has caused outrage [Photo: Chanel]

Cultural appropriation is nothing new in the fashion industry. High-end brands have been stealing from other cultures (without credit) for decades.

So it won’t come as much of a surprise to hear that Parisian label Chanel has done just that.

The brand, headed up by industry icon Karl Lagerfeld, is selling a boomerang. Yes, you read that right.

Part of Chanel’s SS17 pre-collection, the wood and resin style featuring the iconic double C logo will set you back a mere £1,130.

The product has rightfully angered some members of the public with people labelling Chanel as racist for appropriating an important item from Australia’s Aboriginal community.

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The brand has apologised, telling HuffPost Australia: “Chanel is extremely committed to respecting all cultures, and regrets that some may have felt offended.”

However, the product is still available for sale along with a pair of £2,860 rackets and tennis balls costing over £300.

<i>Super expensive beach rackets are also up for grabs [Photo: Chanel]</i>
Super expensive beach rackets are also up for grabs [Photo: Chanel]

Chanel has been under fire for the same thing before. In 2013, Native Americans spoke out against the use of feathered headpieces that appeared in the brand’s Metiers d’Arts show.

It’s not clear whether you can actually use the boomerang or whether it’s simply something to look at. We have reached out to Chanel for comment.

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