Advertisement

7 Flavored Syrups for Cocktails, Coffee, Baking, and More

There's no simpler way to upgrade your favorite recipes with a little extra flavor.

<p>Matt Taylor-Gross / Food Styling by Ali Domrongchai</p>

Matt Taylor-Gross / Food Styling by Ali Domrongchai

Making syrup to bring depth, flavor, and complexity to your drinks might seem like a daunting and tedious extra step, but once you've added a few basic syrup recipes to your repertoire, you'll be amazed at how versatile these basic ingredients can be. We're not just talking about simple syrup — though if you're wondering how to use up a batch, here are some of our favorite simple syrup cocktails. Our favorite flavored syrups can be used to make stellar classic cocktails, nonalcoholic cocktails like the Psychedelic Backyard, as well as decadent and moist baked goods like this Greek Olive Oil and Walnut Cake or this Yuzu and Lemon Cake with Buttercream Frosting. Here's how to make some of our simplest, most popular syrup recipes.

Simple Syrup

<p>Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock</p>

Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock

The bar cart’s hardest working bottle, simple syrup might be the most-used ingredient when it comes to making cocktails. It rounds out the sharp acid in citrus-based drinks like a Whiskey Sour, adds depth and body to a French 75, and even plays a critical role in a Long Island Iced Tea.

Get the Recipe

Honey-Chamomile Syrup

<p>Matt Taylor-Gross / Food Styling by Lucy Simon</p>

Matt Taylor-Gross / Food Styling by Lucy Simon

This chamomile-scented honey syrup is an elevated simple syrup; the chamomile tea steeps in the honey syrup, giving it a sweet and floral aroma.

Get the Recipe

Herb Simple Syrup

Photo by Greg DuPree / Food Styling by Torie Cox / Prop Styling by Claire Spollen
Photo by Greg DuPree / Food Styling by Torie Cox / Prop Styling by Claire Spollen

Blanching tender herbs before blending them in this versatile syrup preserves their delicate, fresh flavors. Use this refreshing syrup in cocktails or mocktails, or drizzle it over fruity desserts.

Get the Recipe

Ginger Syrup

<p>Matt Taylor-Gross / Food Styling by Ali Domrongchai</p>

Matt Taylor-Gross / Food Styling by Ali Domrongchai

Made by simply infusing fresh ginger root into a simple syrup, ginger syrup is an easy-to-use addition to boozy and nonalcoholic cocktails alike. To make this infused simple syrup, starting with fresh ginger root is key.

Get the Recipe

Raspberry Syrup

<p>Matt Taylor-Gross</p>

Matt Taylor-Gross

The Psychedelic Backyard is a tart, slightly sweet nonalcoholic cocktail that also happens to be one of our favorite uses for raspberry syrup.

Get the Recipe

Cucumber, Basil, and Cardamom Syrup

Victor Protasio
Victor Protasio

This infused simple syrup brings a smoky, herbal flavor to the Cucumber-Rose Gin Spritz. Leftover syrup is perfect for adding complexity to lemonade or poaching fruit for a light summer dessert.

Get the Recipe

Cinnamon Syrup

<p>Frederick Hardy II / Food Styling by Emily Nabors Hall / Prop Styling by Risha Carnes</p>

Frederick Hardy II / Food Styling by Emily Nabors Hall / Prop Styling by Risha Carnes

We love to use sweet, smoky cinnamon syrup in nonalcoholic drinks like the Cherry Red, and it adds an autumnal feel to apple cider-based cocktails like the Bushels and Barrels.

Get the Recipe

For more Food & Wine news, make sure to sign up for our newsletter!

Read the original article on Food & Wine.