• ‘Eating for two’ during pregnancy is a dangerous myth, study suggests
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    The Independent

    ‘Eating for two’ during pregnancy is a dangerous myth, study suggests

    While it’s easy to believe that pregnancy warrants an extra slice of cake at tea time, the old adage that women can “eat for two” when they’re expecting poses health risks to the child and mother-to-be, new research suggests. Published in the journal Diabetologia, the study shows that if a woman gains too much or too little weight during pregnancy, it can have adverse effects on their child. According to the analysis of 905 mother-child pairs, which was conducted in Hong Kong, gaining too much weight could put your offspring at an increased risk of insulin resistance and high blood pressure.

  • Science says drinking wine and beer and eating chocolate could help you live longer
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Science says drinking wine and beer and eating chocolate could help you live longer

    And who are we to argue with science?

  • You can’t ask me that: Do you see the cup as half empty or half full?
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    The Independent

    You can’t ask me that: Do you see the cup as half empty or half full?

    Stockpile for Brexit and patch the holes in Grandma’s Anderson shelter. Fortunately, Friday 21 September is World Gratitude Day. If you’re not already an optimist, World Gratitude Day is here to remind you that life’s not really that bad.

  • Anti-inflammatory diet including chocolate, red wine and beer can help you live longer, study claims
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    The Independent

    Anti-inflammatory diet including chocolate, red wine and beer can help you live longer, study claims

    Researchers at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences in Poland carried out a study of around 70,000 men and women whose lifestyles were closely examined during a 16-year period. The study, published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, compared the mortality of those who followed an anti-inflammatory diet and those who didn’t. The team concluded that those who followed an anti-inflammatory diet, regularly eating foods such as fruits, vegetables, tea, coffee, nuts, chocolate and moderate amounts of red wine and beer, had an 18 per cent lower risk of death by any cause.

  • Chrissy Teigen swears by it, but can eating your placenta actually help with postpartum depression?
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    Ciara Sheppard

    Chrissy Teigen swears by it, but can eating your placenta actually help with postpartum depression?

    Many believe that consuming the placenta has real benefits for the mental health of mothers...

  • What surnames have boomed in UK since the Second World War?
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    The Independent

    What surnames have boomed in UK since the Second World War?

    The Second World War marked the start of a wave which saw thousands of people from all over the world make their way to the UK in search of a fresh start. This movement of mass immigration transformed the country into the hub of multiculturalism that it is today. As a result, the prevalence of certain surnames in Britain has risen dramatically since 1939, as revealed by research conducted by Ancestry.co.uk.

  • Why countries are competing in happiness rankings – and what it could mean for economics
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    The Independent

    Why countries are competing in happiness rankings – and what it could mean for economics

    City authorities are developing “smart” approaches to measuring happiness, mobilising an ever increasing array of mobile apps and behavioural data that aim to sense, map and explain our daily happiness. The Smart Dubai Office, a technology initiative led by the UAE government, launched its Smart Happiness Index earlier in 2018, which promises to assess the performance of its city’s managers based on happiness gain per funds spent. This emphasis comes off the back of the new academic field of “happiness studies”, which has emerged as a credible science – with its own research centres and academic journals – since the turn of the 21st century.

  • Why elderly people consider suicide – and why it's controversial
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    The Independent

    Why elderly people consider suicide – and why it's controversial

    On a March morning in 1989, Robert Shoots was found dead in his garage in Weir, Kansas. The Hastings Centre, the ethics institute in Garrison, New York, devoted much of its latest Hastings Centre Report to a debate over “voluntary death” to forestall dementia.

  • Carrie Underwood discusses heartbreak of having three miscarriages in two years
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    The Independent

    Carrie Underwood discusses heartbreak of having three miscarriages in two years

    Carrie Underwood has discussed the heartbreak she felt when she experienced three miscarriages in two years, believing at one point that she may never have any more children. The country singer, who rose to fame in 2005 as the winner of the fourth season of American Idol, has a three-year-old son with her husband, former professional ice hockey player Mike Fisher. The singer revealed to Tracy Smith that she’d become pregnant twice in 2017 and at the beginning of 2018, with each pregnancy resulting in a miscarriage.

  • The reason why Brits are sleeping more now than they did in the 1970s
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    The Independent

    The reason why Brits are sleeping more now than they did in the 1970s

    A study conducted by the University of Oxford explored the way in which people’s sleeping habits have changed between the 1970s and today. The study, which was published in the Journal of Sleep Research, found that Brits are sleeping approximately 43 minutes more than they were in the 1970s, with the majority of adults going to bed half an hour earlier and waking up around 15 minutes later. This is due to a decline in what the researchers described as “work-sleep conflict”, meaning that Brits are finding it easier to balance the demands of work with a good night’s sleep.

  • Chrissy Teigen claims eating placenta helped her avoid postpartum depression after second pregnancy
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    The Independent

    Chrissy Teigen claims eating placenta helped her avoid postpartum depression after second pregnancy

    Chrissy Teigen has been very open about her two pregnancies, having spoken on multiple occasions about the postpartum depression that she experienced following the birth of her first child Luna in 2016. Three months ago, Teigen gave birth to her second child with husband John Legend, a son called Miles. Teigen hasn’t experienced postpartum depression a second time around, and she believes this could be down to a certain something that she ate following the birth of Miles.

  • Experts warn health wearables could fuel rise in tech-driven hypochondria
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Experts warn health wearables could fuel rise in tech-driven hypochondria

    “The ‘worried well’ will be sent into hyperdrive."

  • Mumsnet and Facebook putting women off natural birth with 'tsunami of horror stories'
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    The Independent

    Mumsnet and Facebook putting women off natural birth with 'tsunami of horror stories'

    In today’s social media age, oversharing has become the norm, but where does this leave us when it comes to childbirth? Once an experience shared only between parents and midwives, giving birth has become a trending topic online, as women divulge their stories across a range of platforms with a no holds barred approach to detail. While anecdotes of the labour process may provide feelings of comfort and camaraderie among new and expecting mothers, one midwifery lecturer has claimed that they may be traumatising pregnant women and putting some people off childbirth altogether.

  • Goosebumps could be a sign of a high-achieving and healthy life, study finds
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    The Independent

    Goosebumps could be a sign of a high-achieving and healthy life, study finds

    Have you ever been to a live music gig that was so moving that your skin became covered in tingling goosebumps? Over the summer, a study was conducted at Reading and Leeds music festivals to explore whether experiencing goosebumps can correlate with the state of a person’s health and their personality. The research team discovered that those who experienced goosebumps are more likely to foster stronger relationships with others, to achieve more higher-level academic feats throughout their lives and to be in better health than those who didn’t.

  • E coli: What is the bacteria and what are the symptoms of infection?
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    The Independent

    E coli: What is the bacteria and what are the symptoms of infection?

    A “high level” of E coli has reportedly been found at the Egyptian resort where British couple John and Susan Cooper passed away in August. E coli is commonly known for causing food poisoning and most strains of the bacteria often don't pose a great risk to a person’s health. Not only can people who eat food that’s been contaminated with E coli become infected, but also those who have merely come into contact with it.

  • Vets reveal heartbreaking reality of putting pets down
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    The Independent

    Vets reveal heartbreaking reality of putting pets down

    “When you are a pet owner it is inevitable, the majority of the time, that your pet will die before you do,” the post - which has now gone viral - reads. “Talk about what the procedure is and what to expect, and that if you are concerned you should talk it through with the vet team so they can make it as peaceful and stress-free as you can," he says.

  • One in five mothers believe they had children ‘too late’ in life, survey says
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    The Independent

    One in five mothers believe they had children ‘too late’ in life, survey says

    Amber Butler, who features in the new series, said: “These results show that whilst there are challenges with being a young mum, there are so many more positives. “I love being able to share the experiences we do with my son, Brooklyn, and might not be able to do that if I had less energy.

  • Smacking children should be banned to protect mental health, psychologists say
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    The Independent

    Smacking children should be banned to protect mental health, psychologists say

    Psychologists are calling for the smacking of children in the family home to be outlawed due to the effect it can have on their mental health. Parents and carers are currently legally allowed to smack children lightly if it can be described as a “reasonable punishment”, as outlined in section 58 of the Children Act 2004. Corporal punishment became illegal in British state schools in 1986, but remained legal in private schools until 1998 in England and Wales, until 2000 in Scotland and until 2003 in Northern Ireland.

  • James Van Der Beek calls for a new name for miscarriage
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    The Independent

    James Van Der Beek calls for a new name for miscarriage

    James Van Der Beek has spoken out about the miscarriages his wife suffered and the effect they had on the couple. The actor, best known for his role in Dawson’s Creek, shared a picture on Instagram of himself, his wife Kimberly and their newborn baby. Van Der Beek revealed that Kimberly suffered her third miscarriage before she became pregnant with their fifth child.

  • Why whole-fat milk may be better for you than you think, according to experts
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    The Independent

    Why whole-fat milk may be better for you than you think, according to experts

    Many people believe that consuming milk that’s low-fat or dairy-free is better for your health than opting for whole-fat varieties.

  • When women are at their most fertile time of the month, they smell better to men
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    The Independent

    When women are at their most fertile time of the month, they smell better to men

    If the recent boom of dating apps has taught us anything, it's that choosing someone to spend our lives with can be as quick as the swipe of a finger, where snap decisions are made based solely on what a person looks like. Such a ratio is widely believed to infer peak fertility, suggesting that men may be subconsciously drawn to women who they think are more likely to bear them children.

  • Why fertility clinics are throwing 'egg freezing' parties with champagne and canapés
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    The Independent

    Why fertility clinics are throwing 'egg freezing' parties with champagne and canapés

    Jennifer Lannon lies, her feet propped in stirrups, on an examining table at Extend Fertility, an egg-freezing clinic in midtown Manhattan. A screen at her right displays the results of her ultrasound, the image closely monitored by Lannon and her doctor, Joshua Klein. ​Lannon, who works for Dot.Health, a website that stores participants’ medical data, is 26, more than a decade younger than most women freezing their eggs in the hope of maximising their chances, when they are ready, of conceiving and bearing a healthy child.

  • How to tell if you’re vitamin B12 deficient - and why it matters
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    The Independent

    How to tell if you’re vitamin B12 deficient - and why it matters

    Vitamin B12 is an essential vitamin that the body needs in order to function properly - but it cannot produce it itself. It’s primarily found in animal products, meaning that deficiencies in the vitamin are particularly common among vegans and vegetarians. If not addressed, a vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to a number of physical and mental health problems.