• The 9 best beauty products to buy now, according to The Telegraph's experts
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    The Telegraph

    The 9 best beauty products to buy now, according to The Telegraph's experts

    Fancy investing in a few new beauty products but don't know where to start? Fear not. Each week we will be rounding up the best beauty products that we've tried, tested and loved.

  • 24 times Madonna switched up her beauty look—and we loved it
    Style
    Evening Standard

    24 times Madonna switched up her beauty look—and we loved it

    Nobody does reinvention like Madonna.Since she first broke out in 1982 with the hit Everybody, the beauty chameleon has experimented with just about every look under the sun.From '80s club kid, to punk through various highly-sexed sirens, to geishas and megawatt Hollywood glamour, Madge has managed to effortlessly channel her rebellious rock star status into many a magical makeup moment.As the founder of her own cosmetics line, MDNA Skin, the beauty chameleon always has a flawless alabaster complexion as the starting point for her look. Her signature style is to then offset this with a punchy red lip, a slick of liquid eyeliner and high-impact falsies, but over the years she’s also rocked glowing skin and lip glossed glamour, shimmering pink eye shadows and, of course, that signature beauty spot.When it comes to her locks, the OG queen of pop has pulled off platinum blonde, brunette, jet-black, redhead, curly, straight and cropped with equal amounts of panache.Known for her insistence on growing older on her own terms, the mother-of-six’s best beauty moment has got to be the gold and diamond-encrusted grillz, which she rocked back in 2013.As she celebrates her 61st birthday today, we salute the superstar’s ever adventurous, high-octane approach to beauty.You’re totally badass Madonna, happy birthday.Scroll through the gallery above for Madonna’s most notable hair and beauty moments.

  • The problem with ‘vegan leather’ – is it really more sustainable?
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    The Independent

    The problem with ‘vegan leather’ – is it really more sustainable?

    The fashion industry is not one to jump on trends. It prefers to start them.But that’s not the case when it comes to vegan leather, a material that owes its zeitgeist stamp to the increasing popularity of plant-based diets and sustainable living.Because as more people reduce the amount of animal products on their plates, they’re beginning to take a similar approach to their wardrobes, prompting greater demand for “vegan” garments such as leather. And the brands that are taking note have flourished as a result.Earlier this week, shoe brand Dr Martens announced its profits had surged by 70 per cent in the year to the end of March thanks to the success of its vegan range of boots.The British label follows in the cruelty-free footsteps of Topshop and Adidas, both of whom have added vegan shoes to its collections in the last year. Meanwhile, labels that have always championed vegan leather, such as Veja, continue to be prosper among the street style set.Ethically, it makes sense to choose faux leather over the real thing, with animal rights campaigners pointing to the treatment of cattle that are farmed for beef and milk, of which leather is a byproduct. It's environmentally dubious too, given that no animal is reared purely for its leather and therefore producing it leads to greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation just like beef and milk production. And that's before you’ve considered the consequences of tanning leather. While methods have improved, there are still some tanneries around the world, such as in Bangladesh, that use noxious chemicals such as chromium to tan their leather, which are filled in giant vats and often dumped into rivers once the process is complete.But vegan leather is also problematic, least of all because the term itself is an oxymoron. “There is no such thing as vegan leather,” says Dr Kerry Senior, director at the UK’s leather trade federation, Leather UK. “The term leather is defined by British, European and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards and refers only to the skins or hides of animals, tanned to be imputrescible,” Senior tells The Independent, describing the phrase as an “abuse of the term leather” that continues to be a bugbear for those working in the leather trade.Amy Powney, creative director of sustainable luxury label Mother of Pearl, explains that most leather alternatives are made using synthetic materials, hence why she prefers to use real leather instead. “If you are buying faux leather then you need to consider you are buying plastic,” she tells The Independent, adding how she prefers to use “best practice leather” that is long-lasting and has been made using natural tanning agents.In October, Patrick Grant, creative director of Saville Row tailors Norton & Sons made a similar remark when he criticised eco-conscious brands such as Stella McCartney for "encouraging us to use plastic instead of leather".> There is no such thing as vegan leatherDr Kerry Senior, Leather UKPlastic polymers polyurethane (PU) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) are the most commonly used to produce faux leather fabrics thanks to their supple, vinyl and sometimes wrinkled texture. But both pose serious environmental threats given that they are usually manufactured from fossil fuels and are not biodegradable. Equally, these garments tend to have a short lifespan, meaning consumers may dispose of their faux leather items faster than a long-lasting hand-me-down, resulting in them being sent to landfill.Stella McCartney has admitted to using polyurethane and polyester as an alternative to leather in its products, which it says on its website are “not without concern”. But by using recycled polyester and producing garments that are not machine washable (meaning it avoids the issue of microfibre shedding), the brand claims to have a lower environmental impact than labels who choose to use real leather, citing a calculation from its Environmental Profit and Loss account. > View this post on Instagram> > Super-skinny Alter-Nappa boots with platform crepe soles, captured behind-the-scenes of the Winter 2019 Runway Show in Paris. ⁣ ⁣ Dedicated to the ones we love in the past, present and future. ⁣ ⁣ ThereSheGrows> > A post shared by Stella McCartney (@stellamccartney) on Mar 5, 2019 at 9:01am PSTThat said, like many others, the luxury British label is looking into new ways of producing faux leather fabrics that aren’t quite so environmentally questionable. These include lab-grown leather, which is being spearheaded by biofabrication companies such as Modern Meadow. Elsewhere, there’s Piñatex, a leather alternative made from the cellulose fibre of pineapple leaves that was recently used by H&M in its latest Conscious Collection.But there is development happening in the real leather trade as well.> Leather ticks all the boxes for a sustainable materialRachel Garwood, University of NorthamptonRachel Garwood, director at the Institute for Creative Leather Technologies at the University of Northampton, tells The Independent genuine leather is nowadays far more environmentally friendly than faux alternatives.“It ticks all the boxes for a sustainable material. The problem leather has is that it retains the stigma of historical production methods,” she says, pointing to contemporary methods used by modern tanneries – such as vegetable tanning – that are far less harmful than previous chemical-based processes involved in leather production.“Chemical companies and tanners are working closely with brands to offer reassurance of the clean technology and ethics in leather manufacturing,” Garwood adds, noting that various initiatives such as the Leather Working Group (LWG) rate tanneries on their environmental and ethical practices that help retailers and brands to better identify good practice in their supply chain.> View this post on Instagram> > Looking to complete your Nisolo collection? Our Summer Warehouse Sale begins tomorrow in Nashville. Follow @nisoloshowroom for live updates and consider a road trip to save on exclusive styles this weekend only. 📸: @stylethislife> > A post shared by Nisolo (@nisoloshoes) on Aug 9, 2019 at 10:40am PDTMatt Stockamp, impact associate at US-based footwear brand Nisolo, is constantly trying to improve his supply chain to ensure the leather he uses is ethically sourced and durable. “We know that a lot of our leather comes from farms in the US and northern Mexico,” he tells The Independent. “The majority of our tanneries are also certified by the LWG for their social and environmental practices, which includes a regular, thorough inspection of their water treatment facilities. Diving further into this is an ongoing priority of ours for 2019.” Nisolo’s leather products are designed to last for many years, Stockamp adds. “We’ll need to conduct thorough testing to make sure that any vegan materials also meet our brand’s standards for quality and longevity.”If you want to invest in a real, long-lasting leather garment but you’re not sure about the company’s supply chain, Leigh Mcalea, head of communications at anti-waste organisation Traid tells The Independent the best way forward it to forget about buying something new altogether. Instead, she advises championing circularity by making the most of the ample secondhand options available at charity and vintage shops: “Choosing secondhand displaces the loss of life to animals, environmental destruction and worker exploitation.”

  • These £12 trainers look a lot like this £360 designer pair
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    Red

    These £12 trainers look a lot like this £360 designer pair

    For when you can't afford the £360 designer price tag

  • Hailey Bieber looks unrecognisable with a brunette bob
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Hailey Bieber looks unrecognisable with a brunette bob

    Dark hair suits the star

  • Great News—You Probably Already Own Autumn's Chicest Outfit
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    Who What Wear

    Great News—You Probably Already Own Autumn's Chicest Outfit

    If not, we can help with that.

  • The 4 Autumn Trends Our Editors Are Already Desperate to Wear
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    Who What Wear

    The 4 Autumn Trends Our Editors Are Already Desperate to Wear

    We've got our priorities straight.

  • Special meaning behind Meghan Markle's bracelet
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    Danielle Stacey

    Special meaning behind Meghan Markle's bracelet

    Harry and Meghan shared some new photos to mark World Elephant Day.

  • Quentin Tarantino: the most iconic looks from his films
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    Evening Standard

    Quentin Tarantino: the most iconic looks from his films

    Decadent violence, razor-sharp satire and a collective soundtrack that could exist as your sole collection of music; yep, it’s a Tarantino film.The cult film powerhouse is adding another to the list of posters needed on every teen’s bedroom wall, and new release Once Upon a Time in Hollywood stays true to the classic Tarantino tenets we all know and love – including an impeccable sense of style.From the colour-blocked suits of Kill Bill to the monochrome ensembles of Pulp Fiction’s most iconic scene, we present to you the top looks from Tarantino’s repertoire. Outfit recreation is advised, naturally. Reservoir DogsLining the interior of a thousand student rooms is this image; the skinny black tie, black suit ensemble from Tarantino’s first film. It’s a look that’s been equated to the male version of the Little Black Dress, and with good reason. Pair it with sunglasses, and you’ve got yourself a day-to-night-to-diamond-heist kind of look. True Romance It’s no secret that cowboy culture is back in full swing for 2019, and Alabama Whitman’s cow-hide skirt with cowboy boots is the stuff of front row dreams. Add in a turquoise bra, subtract a top and you’ve got yourself a full look.Plus, it’s doubly on everyone’s radars thanks to Cassie’s Halloween costuming in Euphoria. Watch out for it come this year’s October 31. Pulp Fiction‘Tarantino who?’ they ask, blank faced. ‘You know, the John-Travolta-Uma-Thurman dance scene. With the legs,’ you say. Ah yes – it’s the scene everybody (and their dog) has seen. The crisp white tailoring and black kick flares, paired with a bob so blunt you could use it a ruler, make for a look that thoroughly deserves its iconic status. Natural Born KillersI didn’t know I needed to see Woody Harrelson in a red string vest until I saw this film. Now, it’s the only image I would permit to sit in prime position on my mantelpiece, and with good reason. It’s Woody Harrelson in a string vest and leather jacket! Jackie BrownIt’s an outfit that wouldn’t look out of place in Clueless, yet Jackie Brown definitely would be. Wearing a Kangol beret, oversized hoops and munching on Chinese, she is, as they say, ‘goals’. That, and the fact she tricks a group of gangsters and steals half a million dollars. Nice. Kill Bill: Vol 1Taking inspiration from Bruce Lee in Game of Death, Uma Thurman as The Bride is dressed in an all-yellow suit, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.Thanks to this film, it’s now the only outfit a trained assassin should ever be seen in – it’s easier to see them coming. Inglourious BasterdsIt’s the revenge outfit to end all revenge outfits. To carry out a mission this bold, you need to look the part. And for Shosanna’s final plan of the film, she dresses for the job; in blood red, with a funereal veiled hat to match. Blood and funereal being the operative words, in case you didn’t notice. Django Unchained A look that seems as if it’s straight from an oil painting – and it is. For Jamie Foxx’s Django look, costume designer Sharen Davis took inspiration from Thomas Gainsborough’s 1770 work, Blue Boy. Very camp, very ostentatious and very appropriate.

  • Invisible Men: Largest ever menswear exhibition in UK is coming to London
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    The Independent

    Invisible Men: Largest ever menswear exhibition in UK is coming to London

    The Westminster Menswear Archive has announced that it is opening the most extensive exhibition devoted to menswear in the UK this autumn.Titled Invisible Men, the four-week long show will cover the last 120 years of predominately British menswear through the display of over 170 garments, the majority of which have never been seen on public display. The exhibition will include pieces designed by some of the fashion industry’s biggest names including Alexander McQueen, Vivienne Westwood, Craig Green, Liam Hodges and A Cold Wall*.Arranged into twelve sections, the show – which takes place between 21 October and 24 November – aims to explore the design language of menswear, which, the Westminster Menswear Archive says, mostly centres on functional garments for industrial, technical, or military use.Invisible Men will also look at how designers disrupt convention and how menswear has developed an almost fetishistic appreciation of “the working man in all his heroic iterations”, referencing the clothing of seafarers, soldiers, athletes, firefighters, road workers, and explorers. Professor Andrew Groves, the curator of Invisible Men, said he hopes the exhibition will help to tell the “untold story of menswear”, which he feels has been marginalised and excluded from the history of dress.“Both in museums of the decorative arts or dedicated fashion museums, menswear is significantly underrepresented,” Groves said.“I started the Westminster Menswear Archive in 2016 through frustration that students and designers in industry were unable to see historically important examples of menswear, which is not the case with womenswear which is readily available in exhibitions and galleries. > View this post on Instagram> > England Football Team Tracksuit Top 1990 Umbro navy zip-up long sleeved tracksuit top made by Replikit to replicate the England football team's 1990 kit. It features contrasting geometric ivory and red striped panelling all over the front body, including the letters 'FA' in reference to the Football Association. It has a navy zip closure with a silver square Umbro zip pull. There is a British coat of arms made up of the three lions shield design sewn onto the left chest. The collar is finished with a cotton blue and white stripe panel that runs around the top, ending in a white and red three lions motif embroidered onto the centre back of the collar. The back forms a diamond shape in ivory with a large Umbro logo in navy. It has ribbed cuffs and waistband. It comes with hexagonal cardboard Umbro Replikit swing tag attached with plastic Kimble to the zip (in object file). Country of Design: England Country of Manufacture: Thailand umbro umbrofootball england tracksuit englandfootball trackies sportswear universityofwestminster westminstermensweararchive football> > A post shared by Westminster Menswear Archive (@menswear_archive) on Mar 13, 2019 at 12:32am PDT“We are beginning now to tell the untold story of menswear, and I’m incredibly excited that this exhibition will allow the public to see highlights from the collection, most of which have never been on public display before.”Groves and Dr Danielle Sprecher, co-curator of the exhibition, state that highlights of Invisible Men include a section devoted to examples of Alexander McQueen’s early menswear designs covering the years from 1997 to 1999 and examples from contemporary British menswear designers including Craig Green, Burberry, and Palace.> View this post on Instagram> > C.P. Company Urban Protection Metropolis Jacket 2000 Black Dynafil jacket with multiple double opening wind protection pockets, large hood with a removable anti-smog face mask that was adjustable through openings in the hood. Detachable velcro fastening 'C.P. Company' brand patch. Made from Dynalfil TS-70 bonded to a nylon base. Designed by Moreno Ferrari the 'Metropolis' jacket, which the first piece in the C.P. Company Urban Protection line. Country of Design: Italy Country of Manufacture: Italy cpcompany urbanprotection up casualstyle menswear mensweararchive Dynalfil casuals wearables wearabletech casualoutfit> > A post shared by Westminster Menswear Archive (@menswear_archive) on Mar 9, 2019 at 3:54am PSTInvisible Men will run at the University of Westminster. Opening hours are Wednesday to Sunday 11am-7pm and admission is free.

  • Organza bonanza: it's the summer tulle officially became cool
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Organza bonanza: it's the summer tulle officially became cool

    When Villanelle wore that bubblegum pink, frothy tulle, gown by British designer Molly Goddard in the first season of Killing Eve, tulle officially became cool.And yet, while there’s been a movement – largely underpinned by Goddard’s genius creations – over the last few years to reclaim femininity and embrace frou-frou dresses, the fabric hasn’t really been seen in daywear.Until now.This summer, fashion is wholeheartedly embracing tulle’s super sheer and slinky sister, silk organza. And it’s the perfect OTT-yet-underdressed way to bring a serving of sass – and an inevitable slip o’ the nip – to your summer wardrobe.It all started at Prada’s autumn 2018 show, when an array of ultra-wearable neon organza silhouettes were sent down the runway. From angular patchwork tulle overlays on functional midi skirts to an electric orange tulle bow trailing behind a khaki coat, Miuccia Prada made a material traditionally associated with occasion dressing, instantly appropriate for any occasion. For their spring 2019 collections, brands like Rejina Pyo, Sandy Liang and Rodarte all went big on daywear organza separates in the prettiest of pastels.For his autumn 2019 show, Dries Van Noten made the fabric office-appropriate, by layering the sheerest of loose-fit embroidered organza blouses over structured tailoring. Zara has, as ever, also been quick to catch on, with a summer 2019 collection bursting with Prada-esque organza bow blouses and sheer shirts in an array of gorgeous jewel hues. In fact, it would seem we are all on the hunt for diaphanous delights, as Google searches for ‘organza blouse’ have risen 1280 per cent in 2019 compared to the same time period in 2018.Net-a-Porter has also noticed a 60 per cent increase in searches for ‘organza’ in the last year, with searches for ‘organza dress’ up a whopping 227 per cent. As a result, the online retailer is increasing its organza offering by over 25 per cent for autumn, with some exciting sheer pieces coming in from new brands such Maison Cleo, Nanushka and exclusives by Maggie Marilyn.For this season, Net-a-Porter has found that Mui Mui and Prada’s organza offerings have been super popular, but some of the bestselling organza items have been from smaller brands: shirts by Matin, maxi dresses by Lee Mathews and trend-led suit separates by Rejina Pyo, especially the neon blue blazer.Hungarian brand Nanushka has some seriously cool utilitarian lilac trousers, shirts and trench coats dropping for autumn. Brand founder and creative director Sandra Sandor set out to flip the fabric’s feminine connotations on their head. “Organza has a beautiful and luxurious feel and it's often used for evening wear,” she says. “I wanted to experiment with it and put it in a more modern context, so I combined this elegant fabric with work wear and sportswear elements, for example the organza trousers have a traditional jeans cut. I found the process very interesting and I love the outcome.”Another designer making hay while the organza sun shines is Parisian Mélanie Pothron. Unlike Nanushka, her brand, Aurore Van Milhem, embraces uber-femininity to make beautiful ruffle-collared super sheer organza blouses from the fabric leftover by the great Parisian couture houses.“It’s my favourite material,” says Pothron. “I’ve been obsessed with silk organza since I was a child! I just love everything about it, the transparency and the lightness, how easy it is to work with.”> View this post on Instagram> > LAST TWO ANGIE AVAILABLE ON THE WEBSITE MY LOVES ✨🌞✨🥰✨🌷🌺🌞💐🌸🥰✨🌷🌺🌸🌞❤️💕😍🌞💐🌺💪🌸🌸🥰! MY FAVORITE RIGHT NOW , BRINGS SO MUCH HAPPINESS 🍋🍋🍋> > A post shared by AURORE V A N MILHEM (@aurorevanmilhemparis) on Apr 4, 2019 at 11:25am PDTPothron, who makes all the pieces herself, by hand, and to order, believes the attraction of organza to be its ethereal quality. “I think this kind of material allows the woman wearing it to dream, while feeling incredibly feminine and powerful,” she says. “It transforms a woman into a living and breathing goddess!” Don’t believe her? Check out these mega organza moments…> View this post on Instagram> > Super excited to share that I’ve designed my dream summer sandal with @flattered, launching online and in-store soon. She’s strappy, super flattering on the foot and goes with pretty much everything.> > A post shared by Jessie Bush (@wethepeoplestyle) on Mar 20, 2019 at 9:45am PDT> View this post on Instagram> > Monday Mood.... c/o @alexeaglestudio ☁️> > A post shared by A L E X E A G L E (@eagletta) on May 12, 2019 at 8:54pm PDT> View this post on Instagram> > Organza salad 🥬🧝🏼‍♀️ @lesfleurstudio> > A post shared by Courtney Trop (@alwaysjudging) on Jun 18, 2019 at 9:17am PDT> View this post on Instagram> > Sharing some of the things I read, watched and generally enjoyed this past month over on the blog (because you can never have enough Netflix recommendations). Link in bio.> > A post shared by Jessie Bush (@wethepeoplestyle) on Apr 5, 2019 at 8:58am PDT

  • Every Influencer I Follow Owns This Cult High-Street Buy
    Style
    Who What Wear

    Every Influencer I Follow Owns This Cult High-Street Buy

    It's finally back in stock.

  • All the beautiful gowns you can expect to see at the V&A's Dior exhibition
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    All the beautiful gowns you can expect to see at the V&A's Dior exhibition

    From those worn by Princess Margaret to Charlize Theron and more

  • J Crew launches new version of Meghan Markle and Pippa Middleton’s rattan clutch
    Style
    Jessica Morgan

    J Crew launches new version of Meghan Markle and Pippa Middleton’s rattan clutch

    The Rattan clutch is back in a hot new style

  • 4 Autumn Trends That Are Popping Off at H&M
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    Who What Wear

    4 Autumn Trends That Are Popping Off at H&M

    New season = new lease of life.

  • I Just Found So Many Cult Buys for Less on Amazon
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    Who What Wear

    I Just Found So Many Cult Buys for Less on Amazon

    You'll believe it when you see it.

  • Alex Rodriguez posts jaw-dropping photo of 50-year-old Jennifer Lopez in a bikini: 'Hotness overload'
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    Erin Donnelly

    Alex Rodriguez posts jaw-dropping photo of 50-year-old Jennifer Lopez in a bikini: 'Hotness overload'

    "Good lord as if she’s 50," read one reaction to A Rod's tribute to a bikini-clad J.Lo.

  • Our favourite Scandinavian labels to note this Copenhagen Fashion Week
    Style
    The Independent

    Our favourite Scandinavian labels to note this Copenhagen Fashion Week

    Scandinavian women are renowned across the globe for their minimalistic, comfortable and devastatingly cool clothes. So it’s no surprise that some of the hottest brands among the street style and influencer set hail from cities such as Copenhagen and Stockholm.Labels like Ganni and By Malene Birger have acquired a cult following in recent years, with the former loved for its kitschy tea dresses and retro smocks, the latter for its sharp tailoring and timeless prints.But there are some notable new faces emerging on the Scandi fashion scene – and they're pushing sartorial boundaries like never before.Leading the way is Saks Potts, the playful label whose statement fur-collared coats are loved by everyone from Cardi B to Lady Gaga.Elsewhere there’s Stine Goya, whose wallpaper prints and girlish drawstring bags have been lauded among fashion editors.As Copenhagen Fashion Week gets underway and the aforementioned brands showcase their latest collections, get ahead of the game with our roundup of the best Scandinavian fashion labels to note now. Saks Potts> View this post on Instagram> > COLLECTION 11 - PARIS PRESENTATION> > A post shared by Saks Potts (@sakspotts) on Mar 5, 2019 at 2:30pm PSTNorth West is a fan of this brash and vintage-inspired label – yes, the six-year-old daughter of Kim Kardashian and Kanye West. The child was seen wearing one of the brand’s staple sequin co-ords to her birthday party last year. But Saks Potts makes clothes for grownups too. Excellent ones. Designers Cathrine Saks and Barbara Potts – see what they did there? – have created bespoke gowns for Emily Ratajkowski, crafted fur coats for Katy Perry and are responsible for designing the must-have tights of London Fashion Week last season: a monochrome pair emblazoned with the “SP” logo. The clothes don’t come cheap, with dresses and tops averaging at £220, but they pack a punch in terms of design and quality, making them worth every penny. Stine Goya> View this post on Instagram> > The AW19 goyamelody collection is now available online & instore 🖌 Shop drop one via link in bio stinegoya AW19 📸@hedvig_jenning Styling; @naomi_itkes Makeup; @trineskjoeth Hair; @mettethorsgaard Model; @ireneguarenas Set Design; @studio0405> > A post shared by STINE GOYA (@stinegoyastudio) on Jul 22, 2019 at 2:00am PDTThis Copenhagen-based label brings art and fashion together with infallible fusion. Every shirt, jumpsuit and dress is intricately designed, with grandiose patterns splashed across garments in unexpected palettes. There are the floral shirt dresses that look as if they’ve been plucked from a 1950s film about domestic goddesses and elsewhere are the stellar suits – this gingham one made from organic hemp is a particular showstopper. Prices range from £100 to £3,000. Ganni> View this post on Instagram> > 🏝 @emmafridsell wears our neon seersucker dress gannigirls ganni> > A post shared by GANNI (@ganni) on Jul 28, 2019 at 2:40am PDTGanni has been the definitive poster child for Scandinavian fashion for some time now. And for good reason. You'll have seen its famous slogan tees doing the rounds on the front row and will immediately crave its latest cult item: a neon check smock hailed by British Vogue as “the dress of the summer”. But don’t neglect Ganni’s other, less hashtagged, offerings. Its footwear, for example, is particularly noteworthy, with chunky flatforms that transport you back to Camden Market in its heyday and neon normcore trainers that wouldn’t look out of place in your dad’s wardrobe from the 1980s. Cecilie Copenhagn> View this post on Instagram> > Enjoying the waterside in Shirt O, Long Sleeves, Deep Blue 💦⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 📸 @carolinehgroth ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ceciliecopenhagen handloompiece nowonline ootd outfitoftheday repost> > A post shared by CECILIE COPENHAGEN (@ceciliecopenhagen) on May 23, 2019 at 11:44am PDTGirl on the prairie meets sun-seeking nomad in this Danish label. Cecilie Copenhagen knows how good its prints are, because it produces several items in each of them, allowing its avid fanbase – which includes Rihanna – to snap up numerous garments in their favourite styles. There’s the sorbet pink polka dot pattern that you can find in a ruffled skirt or a baby doll dress, or for those looking to channel some Riviera style, you can don one of the yolk yellow sunray co-ords, which also come in monochrome. By Malene Birger> View this post on Instagram> > This collection eliminates the dilemma of “nothing to wear.” If you’ve got these pieces, you’ve got it all!> > A post shared by By Malene Birger (@bymalenebirger) on May 22, 2019 at 3:00am PDTThe influencer set loves this one. By Malene Birger was founded in 2003 but has gone from strength to strength in recent years as demand for the Scandi aesthetic has grown. The label's polished and pared-back collections have been praised for flattering the female form. The is a brand that trades in subtlety and reinvigorates otherwise humdrum workwear with slick cuts and jacquard prints. The accessories are lust-worthy too, with teams of on-trend sporty sneakers and clean leather tote bags.

  • The best street style looks from Copenhagen Fashion Week SS20
    Style
    Evening Standard

    The best street style looks from Copenhagen Fashion Week SS20

    Style inspiration can be tricky to come by in August.Holidays and festivals make it the month of shorts and tees, while enduring heatwave temperatures have seen even the most stylish of city dwellers begin to slack on the fash.Fear not, though, for the international style set this week descended on Copenhagen for the city's bi-annual fashion week, and gave us all sorts of handy dressing cues for the season to come.In town to see Spring/Summer 2020 collections from the likes of Ganni, Stine Goya, Saks Potts and Malene Birger, Scandi cool girls like Stephanie Broek, Emili Sindlev, Nina Sandbech and Jeanette Madsen brought their sartorial A game, and provided us with plenty of inspiration for our trans-seasonal wardrobes. Here are five key trends to wear now: Flip-flops with everythingThis time last year the Copenhagen street style set were the first to decree the humble Havaiana as high fashion footwear, and a year on the flip-flop has firmly established itself as an off-beat (and incredibly comfortable) accoutrement to everything from evening dresses to suiting. Wear inexpensive versions in block colours with, quite literally, anything and everything. Clutch bagsAfter months – nay years? – in which the cross-body has reigned supreme, the clutch bag is finally creeping its way back into the mitts of the street style set. And Bottega Veneta’s pouch (£1,730) has most definitely emerged as the current fashion girl favourite. BasicsWhite vests, white shirts, white tees… Simple jeans, leather trousers… in amongst all the floral dresses and fruit salad suiting (of which there was plenty), a cadre of minimalists emerged on the streets of Copenhagen this week proving that investing in timeless, good quality basics is always a good idea. High-tech trainersIf ‘Ugly’ dad trainers were the agenda-setting sneaker style of the last year or two, then its high-tech, geeky running trainers that are about to chase those ugly Balenciaga Triple S sneakers out of the park. Pair neon Asics running shoes with pencil skirts and Nike P-6000s with suiting. Need pointers? Look no further than Copenhagen’s very own geek sneaker queen Emilie Sindlev, who’s a frontrunner (sorry) of the trend. Bermuda shortsBack in April we predicted that Bermuda shorts would become a style staple of summer, and the streets of Copenhagen would appear to agree. First seen on the spring/summer 2019 catwalks, the grown-up cousin of last summer’s omnipresent bicycle shorts are best worn loose fit and knee-skimming… a truncated boyfriend jean if you will. Apple and rustFinding a perfect Pantone pairing comes high on many a fashion girl's agenda, and spotted on the streets of Copenhagen this week was a combo that felt fresher than fresh. Apple and rust, pistachio and caramel, lime and chestnut… as delicious sounding a pairing as it looked.Scroll through the gallery above for all the best street style looks from Copenhagen Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2020.

  • Singer Rita Ora trolled for wearing 'child-sized' bikini
    Style
    Gillian Wolski

    Singer Rita Ora trolled for wearing 'child-sized' bikini

    The Brit bombshell has been called out for her teeny-weeny swimwear.