Women with long hair are more attractive, have more sex: study

Call it a mane attraction.

Scholars in South Korea have uncovered a surprising connection between a woman’s hair length and her sex life.

Scholars in South Korea have uncovered a surprising connection between a woman’s hair length and her sex life. Volodymyr – stock.adobe.com
Scholars in South Korea have uncovered a surprising connection between a woman’s hair length and her sex life. Volodymyr – stock.adobe.com

The hair-raising study was published last month in the academic journal Evolutionary Psychology, with researchers wondering whether ladies with long locks were more likely to be getting it on.

The academics asserted that some of the most feminine figures in fiction had been blessed with cascades of tumbling tresses, including Rapunzel and Venus from Botticelli’s “The Birth of Venus.”

“Such depictions of women with long, silky hair create an image of womanliness, which may be alluring to the perceiver owing to the intricate sense of femininity displayed,” the team, led by Jeong Eun Cheon, declared.

“The image of an ideal woman often involves her having long, silky hair,” they continued. “However, the dearth of psychological research on hair limits the understanding of how women’s hair functions in romantic relationships.”

To uncover whether a woman’s hair had any bearing on her bedroom activities, the team recruited 204 heterosexual married couples, asking them questions about hair quality, hair length, attractiveness, sexual desire, sexual frequency and sexual satisfaction.

Horny for hair! To uncover whether a woman’s hair had any bearing on her bedroom activities, the team recruited 204 heterosexual married couples, asking them questions about hair quality, hair length, attractiveness, sexual desire, sexual frequency and sexual satisfaction. deagreez – stock.adobe.com
Horny for hair! To uncover whether a woman’s hair had any bearing on her bedroom activities, the team recruited 204 heterosexual married couples, asking them questions about hair quality, hair length, attractiveness, sexual desire, sexual frequency and sexual satisfaction. deagreez – stock.adobe.com

The results revealed that men are horny for hair.

Women with longer, healthier locks were deemed hotter by their husbands — and were having more sex as a result.

“Men found women with longer hair to be more attractive, which consequently resulted in heightened sexual desire among men,’ the team stated. “This heightened sexual desire was again associated with a higher likelihood of more frequent sexual intercourse within the couples.”

They added that the findings indicate “that women’s hair may, indeed, work to convey an evolutionary message to the opposite sex.”

Bad news for women with pixie cuts: Women with longer, healthier locks were deemed hotter by their husbands — and were having more sex as a result. Drobot Dean – stock.adobe.com
Bad news for women with pixie cuts: Women with longer, healthier locks were deemed hotter by their husbands — and were having more sex as a result. Drobot Dean – stock.adobe.com

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Meanwhile, the women involved in the study were also asked questions about their husband’s hair.

While it may be assumed that men with thick hair similarly send “evolutionary messages” about attractiveness and fertility, the results revealed that there was no correlation between a man’s mane and his sex life.

So while that may be welcome news for balding blokes, the academics did admit that more research needs to be done.

“Future research should explore how the importance of hair quality or length may vary across different demographics, motivations, or stages of life,” Cheon and her team stated.

“Future research should explore how the importance of hair quality or length may vary across different demographics, motivations, or stages of life,” Cheon and her team stated. Montri Thipsorn – stock.adobe.com
“Future research should explore how the importance of hair quality or length may vary across different demographics, motivations, or stages of life,” Cheon and her team stated. Montri Thipsorn – stock.adobe.com

They also noted that their study only involved married couples, meaning it might be a whole different ball game for singletons with short ‘dos.

“The preferences and behaviors of couples in the nascent stages of dating could differ from those in longer, more established relationships,” they wrote. “Such potential variations in individual preferences merit further investigation in future studies.”