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Woman returns from holiday with flesh-eating larvae 'moving' in her skin

Sophie Hall from Bergh Apton returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin. Picture: Sophie Hall/NHS <i>(Image: Sophie Hall/NHS)</i>
Sophie Hall from Bergh Apton returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin. Picture: Sophie Hall/NHS (Image: Sophie Hall/NHS)

A 31-year-old woman returned home with the wrong kind of holiday souvenir after discovering flesh-eating larvae "moving" in her skin.

Sophie Hall, from Bergh Apton, had been on a two-week holiday in South Africa with her partner and his daughter and had what she thought were two infected mosquito bites.

But Miss Hall soon found out she actually had some "alarming" unwelcome visitors in her skin.

Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin
Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin

Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin (Image: Sophie Hall)

The communications officer for the RSPB "noticed something moving inside" the bite marks and when she squeezed the bumps, a maggot-like creature popped out of each one.

READ MORE: Holiday horror for pub landlord as family contract parasitic infection

Miss Hall took creatures to her GP in Loddon, who photographed them under the microscope and sent them off to the School of Tropical Medicine.

Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin
Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin

Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin (Image: Sophie Hall)

Doctors and specialists confirmed the insects were larvae of a parasitic fly - a species of blowfly or mango fly.

The flies are attracted to sand or damp places to lay their eggs.

Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin
Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin

Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin (Image: Sophie Hall)

Miss Hall believes they may have landed on her swimsuit while it was drying by the pool.

READ MORE: Woman fighting for life after contracting disease believed to be from Florida Airbnb

The eggs hatch into larvae and when they make contact with the skin of a mammal, they bury into flesh.

Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin
Eastern Daily Press: Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin

Sophie Hall returned from a holiday in South Africa with the larvae of parasitic flies in her skin (Image: Sophie Hall)

As the larvae eat the flesh they grow and burst out to continue their life cycle.

Miss Hall added: "It felt a bit gruesome but I am interested in bugs so once I was over the shock it was really interesting to see under the microscope."

The bite marks are itchy as they heal but Miss Hall should not have any long-term effects.