Windrush mural at Brixton Tube station to star in Tate show

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·1-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Remain. Thriving by Njideka Akunyili Crosby (Njideka Akunyili Crosby/Tate)
Remain. Thriving by Njideka Akunyili Crosby (Njideka Akunyili Crosby/Tate)

A huge mural tribute to the Windrush generation originally designed for Brixton tube station is going on show at the Tate.

The work called Remain, Thriving, is three and a half metres long by almost two metres and was made by Nigerian artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby.

It shows a scene in an imagined south London front room where the grandchildren of original Caribbean immigrants have gathered together surrounded by photographs and furniture that recall the post-war generation who came to Britain from the Commonwealth.

The first passengers to make the journey arrived in 1948, on board the ship Empire Windrush, and many made their home in Brixton and the surrounding area.

The mural, which has been bought to become part of Tate Britain’s permanent collection, is being exhibited in the Life Between Islands show about British-Caribbean art.

It is one of seven works by five artists bought by the gallery to increase the number of British-Caribbean artists and art in its collection.

Director of Collection Polly Staple said: “We are delighted that the work of five pioneering artists within Life Between Islands will join our permanent collection. Spanning multiple generations of creative practice, these acquisitions enable the perspectives within the exhibition to be studied and enjoyed by generations to come, strengthening our representation of British art in ways that reflect the public Tate serves.”

The show, which runs from December 1 to April 3, also includes photographs of performers from the capitals grime scene and a new version of Michael McMillan’s installation Front Room which recreates the home of a political active woman in 1970s London.

Read More

Life Between Islands at Tate Britain review: a captivating collection of cracking Caribbean art

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting