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Why Gen Z, millennials are ‘obsessed’ with bizarre ‘broccoli freckles’ trend

Cosmetics connoisseurs are flocking to the nearest grocer’s produce aisle to achieve an haute, albeit avant-grade, style: fake freckles.
Cosmetics connoisseurs are flocking to the nearest grocer's produce aisle to achieve an haute, albeit avant-grade, style: fake freckles.

They’re vegging out — faux real.

Cosmetics connoisseurs are going green in the name of a buzzy beauty how-to.

They’re flocking to the nearest grocer’s produce aisle to achieve an haute, albeit avant-grade, style: fake freckles.

“I literally look crazy right now,” admitted makeup tastemaker Paulina Reitman, a Gen Z New Yorker, in a TikTok tutorial entitled: “Trying the broccoli freckle trend.”

In the clip, with more than 173,000 views, the fair-skinned brunette is seen using a floret to dab dark flecks of makeup onto her cheeks in an attempt to feign the look of natural freckles.

“I already had a piece of broccoli in my fridge, and I was like, ‘Let’s try it,’” said Reitman as she rubbed her bronzer onto the vegetable. The 20-something patted the excess product off of the veggie and onto the back of her hand before applying the makeshift marks to her cheeks and nose.

And, much to the diva’s delight, the plant accomplished the preen.

“Shut up!” she exclaimed with glee while blending the dots into her foundation. “When summer comes around — are you kidding?” added Reitman, who claims the posh finished product pleasantly “shook” her to the core.

The viral “broccoli freckles” trend comes after women have permanently scarred their faces using needles, inks and dyes to achieve faux freckles. Shutterstock
The viral “broccoli freckles” trend comes after women have permanently scarred their faces using needles, inks and dyes to achieve faux freckles. Shutterstock

The ever-organic hack is picking up steam amongst the spotted-wannabes of the fashionable faux freckles movement.

It’s a much healthier alternative to drug store-bought henna pen that Takwa Larsen, 26, from Alanya, Turkey, used in an attempt to jazz up her mane last year. Rather than transforming herself into a freckled belle, Larsen confessedly looked like the green-hued Fiona, of “Shrek” fame.

And in November 2021, Australian content creator Tilly Whitfeld explained to The Post that she temporarily went blind after tattooing freckles across her face with a sewing needle and ink she’d purchased online.

“[My skin] is still healing. It will never be the same,” said Whitfeld. “It is permanently scarred.”

Kristy Sarah stunned her husband and followers when she applied faux freckles to her mug with broccoli. @kristy.sarah//TikTok
Kristy Sarah stunned her husband and followers when she applied faux freckles to her mug with broccoli. @kristy.sarah//TikTok

The broccoli method, however, seems to be leaving a good taste in everyone’s mouth — so far, at least.

Swedish model Cajsa Wessberg, 33, scored over 46.2 million views in a demonstration of the hack.

The buzz-cut blond even enjoyed a bite out of the fibrous grooming tool.

Influencer Kristy Sarah left her husband slack-jawed after he spotted her dolling up with a hunk of the green stuff in a post that amassed 2.1 million clicks. 

And Krista Lavrusik, a self-professed “millennial mom with Gen Z style,” has become “obsessed” with the broccoli-assisted primp. She even cheekily coined a nickname for the process.

“Broccoli freckles — breckles,” Lavrusik said with a giggle to her nearly 150,000 followers. “Get ‘em. Do ‘em.”