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Wendy’s adds orange Frosty to spring menu as American fans demand more treats from overseas menus: ‘I’m jealous’

A Wendy's creamsicle shake is coming to America, but fans strongly desire other options that only exist abroad.
A Wendy's creamsicle shake is coming to America, but fans strongly desire greater access other menu treats that only exist abroad.

Do better, Dave.

Wendy’s has whipped up yet another social media storm with the announcement of a new orange creamsicle-flavored Frosty, available at US locations from Mar. 19 — but fans are demanding more than just a taste of the vast variety of sweet treats available exclusively overseas.

The controversy-courting fast foodery, which found itself under fire recently over a widely misunderstood dynamic pricing announcement, will ice out the current vanilla option – at least temporarily — in flavor of the festive new dessert, according to People.

A Wendy’s creamsicle shake is coming to America, but fans strongly desire other options that only exist abroad. Wendy's
A Wendy’s creamsicle shake is coming to America, but fans strongly desire other options that only exist abroad. Wendy's

A fast food influencer sparked the latest conversation by posting a tantalizing Instagram photo of several Wendy’s dessert drinks available in the chain’s locations in The Philippines.

The scrumptious selection included frappe drinks with kit kats, strawberries and cream and coffee jelly, plus both vanilla and chocolate “Frostyccinos.”

“We need this ASAP in the US,” one user commented.

“Why does American Wendy’s hate us,” added another as a fellow fan wrote, “[I’m] jealous.”

Back in the states, Wendy’s also recently announced app-based burger deals — $1 for Dave’s Single or $2 for a Dave’s Double, through April 10.

A KitKat flavored Wendy’s frosty sold outside of the U.S. has stateside customers irked. Instagram/Wendy's
A KitKat flavored Wendy’s frosty sold outside of the U.S. has stateside customers irked. Instagram/Wendy's

It was done just after fan pushback on the so-called dynamic price testing, which appeared to catch the company by surprise.

“To clarify, Wendy’s will not implement surge pricing, which is the practice of raising prices when demand is highest. We didn’t use that phrase, nor do we plan to implement that practice,” Wendy’s spokesperson Heidi Schauer said in a statement to The Post.