• How investment transformed Cambodia's coastline – and where to find the good bits
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    The Independent

    How investment transformed Cambodia's coastline – and where to find the good bits

    Ten years ago, the Cambodian coast was referred to as “Thailand without the crowds”, its laid-back beaches providing a welcome budget break for backpackers travelling between Thailand and Vietnam.Back in 2006, I enjoyed a week-long stay at the Serenity Guesthouse in Sihanoukville, a welcome stop after seeing the Killing Fields and Tuol Sleng genocide museum in Phnom Penh and a sweaty bicycle tour of Angkor Wat. Back then, a lovely private room in a small, locally owned hotel in a relatively luxurious treehouse-like setting overlooking the sea cost the princely sum of £4 per night.

  • 48 hours in . . . Malaga, an insider guide to the cultural gateway to Andalucía
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in . . . Malaga, an insider guide to the cultural gateway to Andalucía

    Malaga has shaken off its reputation as being merely the gateway to the Costa del Sol. Revamped and revitalised, the city now boasts a sleek port, an exciting culinary scene and a rapidly growing clutch of artistic attractions. In fact, it’s quickly becoming recognised as one of Spain’s cultural hubs, bursting at the seams with places to explore from the attention-grabbing Pompidou Centre and ever-popular Museu de Picasso – which celebrates Malaga’s most famous son – to the street-art-cloaked streets of its edgy Soho district.

  • Introducing the independent British ski brand set to dress Team GB
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    The Telegraph

    Introducing the independent British ski brand set to dress Team GB

    For most 18 year olds who set out to do a winter as a seasonaire the ambition of becoming a professional skier, exploring the biggest mountains with some of the world’s best athletes, is something of a pipe dream.

  • 48 hours in . . . Florence, an insider guide to the cradle of the Renaissance
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in . . . Florence, an insider guide to the cradle of the Renaissance

    Firenze, the cradle of the Renaissance, is one of Europe’s great art cities. With frescoes by Giotto and Ghirlandaio, canvases by Botticelli and Bronzino, and sculptures by Michelangelo and Giambologna, there is so much exquisite art and architecture within its ancient walls that it’s easy to become overwhelmed.

  • US lawmakers battle shrinking plane seats, bringing fresh hope for passengers
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    The Telegraph

    US lawmakers battle shrinking plane seats, bringing fresh hope for passengers

    Tightly-packed plane passengers might have new hope for relief this week after lawmakers in the US have added their voices to the backlash against stingy airline seating.

  • How bad are private jets for the environment?
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    The Independent

    How bad are private jets for the environment?

    With the conversation around climate change hotting up in recent months, more attention than ever is being paid to the way we travel.Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have come under fire for taking four trips by private jet in 11 days – with celebrities quick to step forward and defend the royal couple – while teenage activist Greta Thunberg’s decision to reach America via yacht to reduce her carbon footprint has drawn praise and censure from those on both sides of the debate.

  • 48 hours in . . . Seville, an insider guide to Spain's steamy southern city
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in . . . Seville, an insider guide to Spain's steamy southern city

    Known for its steamy-hot summers, mild winters and sultry operatic gypsy heroine Carmen, Seville is a bijou city whose fabulous food, extraordinary Mudejar, Gothic and Renaissance architecture, and exotic flamenco rhythms never fail to charm and seduce. History oozes through its very pores, with ancient Moorish walls, Roman ruins and Baroque churches at every turn.

  • Tell us about your favourite aerial experiences for the chance to win a £500 Eden Hotel Collection voucher
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    The Telegraph

    Tell us about your favourite aerial experiences for the chance to win a £500 Eden Hotel Collection voucher

    Inspired by our Top 10 round-up of thrills in the air, published in this Sunday's print edition? Then tell us about your most unusual flight, whether it was by seaplane, hang-glider, helicopter, biplane, light aircraft, hot-air balloon or some other mode of air transport. Where were you going, and what made the flight special? The reader who sends in the best entry wins a £500 voucher.

  • The world's best stopover cities, from Atlanta to Singapore
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    The Independent

    The world's best stopover cities, from Atlanta to Singapore

    Can’t bear the thought of a marathon plane journey? Then breaking the trip into two sections with a stopover might just be the way forward.Pick the right airline, and you can get a city break tagged on to the main trip – and these are 10 of the best options.

  • Bank holiday travel: King’s Cross closure to cause severe disruption this weekend
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    The Independent

    Bank holiday travel: King’s Cross closure to cause severe disruption this weekend

    Is your journey really necessary this weekend? Rail travellers on the two main north-south routes face severe disruption over the bank holiday weekend.On the flagship East Coast main line linking London with Yorkshire, northeast England and Scotland, passengers have been urged not to travel over the bank holiday weekend.

  • British Airways backs plans for plant that will turn everyday waste into fuel
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    The Independent

    British Airways backs plans for plant that will turn everyday waste into fuel

    British Airways has submitted plans for a plant to turn waste into jet fuel that will one day power its aircraft.The flag carrier has submitted plans to develop a site in northeast Lincolnshire that will turn everyday household and commercial waste into sustainable fuels. It’s slated to be the first plant of its kind in Europe.

  • Style
    The Telegraph

    13 of the best free things to do in Venice

    You don't have to spend lots of money to enjoy Venice, the city is so interesting architecturally, historically and culturally that you can easily spend the day marvelling at the sights and attractions around you. From watching free glassblowing demonstrations in Murano, and wandering markets of Rialto, to spending a few hours at the Lido and exploring the many churches, here are a few of the best free things to do in Venice, by Telegraph Travel destination expert, Anne Hanley.

  • 48 hours in . . . Venice, an insider guide to the City of Water
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in . . . Venice, an insider guide to the City of Water

    There are days when visitors to this exquisite jewel box of a city outnumber locals two-to-one, and when getting from the station to St Mark's square is a battle. But despite this, Venice never loses its capacity to enchant: stepping out of the station to be greeted by a glittering canal with the dome of San Simeon Piccolo beyond remains heart-stopping, whether you're doing it for the first time or the 100th.

  • 48 hours in. . . Toronto, an insider guide to Canada's spirited first city
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in. . . Toronto, an insider guide to Canada's spirited first city

    Canada’s largest city, the fourth largest in North America, is consistently ranked one of the best places to live in the world. Spending even a few days here makes it easy to see why. Cosmopolitan and cultured, fun and fun-loving, with an icing of unpredictability just to make things interesting, Toronto takes pride in being the dynamic, creative and safe sum of all its parts.

  • Ryanair strikes: New hack can tell you the likelihood of your flight being cancelled as walkout looms
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    The Independent

    Ryanair strikes: New hack can tell you the likelihood of your flight being cancelled as walkout looms

    The travel plans of tens of thousands of passengers booked to fly with Ryanair on Thursday and Friday 22 and 23 August depend on the outcome of court cases that will be heard only on Wednesday.Pilots’ unions in the UK and Ireland have called 48-hour strikes in an increasingly bad-tempered dispute over a range of issues, and Ryanair is challenging the legitimacy of the ballots.

  • Ryanair strikes: How to tell if your flight could be cancelled by pilot walkout
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    The Independent

    Ryanair strikes: How to tell if your flight could be cancelled by pilot walkout

    Hundreds of thousands of passengers are waiting to find out if their flights will be cancelled in the latest round of Ryanair strikes this summer.Here are the key questions and answers that will help you detect whether your flight is at risk of being cancelled. What’s happening?Pilots employed by Ryanair in the UK who belong to the British Airline Pilots’ Association (Balpa) have voted strongly in support of a strike. They are in dispute with Europe’s biggest budget carrier on a range of issues from pensions to maternity benefits. Two strikes have been called for the end of the summer holidays: one on 22 and 23 August, the other on 2, 3 and 4 September.In addition pilots employed by Ryanair in Ireland have announced a strike on 22 and 23 August. The Irish Airline Pilots’ Association (Ialpa) added that it would notify the company of further strike days in due course. The airline has sought an injunction from the High Court to stop the Irish pilots' strike, but is still waiting on a decision.Everyone involved says they are sorry for the situation. Brian Strutton, general secretary of Balpa, says: “No pilot wants to spoil the public’s travel plans but at the moment it seems we have no choice.”The Irish union says it regrets “any disruption that might flow from management’s unwillingness or inability to negotiate a fair and transparent pay package”.And Ryanair’s chief people officer Eddie Wilson said: “We have done everything in our power to avoid disruption to our flights and our customers’ holidays.”It is still unclear whether the strikes will go ahead and, if they do, what the effects will be.But were they to take place, I estimate that, of the two million passengers booked to travel on Ryanair on those five days of pilots’ strikes, 500,000 are at potential risk of having their flights cancelled. Why are only one-quarter of passengers potentially affected?Because British pilots make up 23 per cent of Ryanair’s total, and probably operate the same proportion of the airline’s flights. The action by Irish flight crew on 22 and 23 August will add a couple of per cent to that figure. All the rest are crewed from other European countries and should not be affected – though cabin crew strikes in Portugal and Spain may jeopardise some flights.Note that my 500,000 figure is for all the people booked on planes piloted by UK or Ireland-based crew, but the actual figure affected is likely to be many fewer. That is because by no means will all pilots in the UK and Ireland strike.Ryanair estimates fewer than half its pilots in those countries are union members. It is likely, therefore, that the majority of flights originating from the UK and Ireland will depart on the strike days. But this is how to tell if your departure is at risk. Booked to fly on Ryanair between Britain and Ireland, or domestically within the UK, on 22 or 23 August?If so, you can guarantee the flight is scheduled to be flown by pilots based either in the UK or Ireland. The chances of it operating depends on whether or not the airline decides to crew it from available staff. Booked to fly on Ryanair from the UK on 22 or 23 August, or 2, 3 and 4 September?You can try to work out if your flight is due to be operated by UK-based pilots. As mentioned, many flights to and from British airports are flown by pilots based abroad, and will be unaffected. Without access to Ryanair’s rosters, identifying the likely crew is not an exact science. But you can make an educated guess based on departure and turnaround times. I will illustrate this with an example of links between London and Milan.It is extremely likely that any flight departing between 6am and 7.30am is crewed from the country from which that flight is leaving. The first Ryanair flight from Stansted to Milan Bergamo, at 8.05am, is outside that window. It will be operated by an Italian crew who are due to arrive at 7.40am after an early start from Italy. The same applies for the first Ryanair departure from Stansted to Milan Malpensa, at 8.45am.Later in the day, my technique is to identify an A-B-A pattern with a 25- or 30-minute gap between arriving/departing at B. That makes it likely the flight is crewed from A.The reasoning is that Ryanair loves quick turnarounds between arriving and departing. But those are much easier to schedule on a flight from a base (A) to the destination (B) and back again than actually at the base.You can do this by making a test booking at ryanair.com, for a same-day return from your starting point. So the 8.15am flight from Southend to Milan Bergamo arrives at 11am, with the return scheduled for 11.25am. That tells me it is a British-crewed flight, and therefore susceptible for grounding.Towards the end of the evening, Ryanair likes to have all its planes back home by 11pm or midnight. So the 8.05pm from Stansted to Bergamo, due to arrive at 11.05pm, will not be going anywhere else afterwards – and the Italian-based pilots will be heading home. If I find my flight is at risk, what can I do?At this stage, little beyond spending a fortune on an alternative flight – which may turn out to be unnecessary if the strike is called off or your departure is selected to be crewed by pilots who are working.If your flight is chosen for cancellation, Ryanair should let you know a couple of days ahead. The airline will offer you a refund, but you are entitled to ask for a an alternative departure. If Ryanair cannot fly you on the day you are booked, you can demand a flight on a different airline. It must also provide hotel accommodation and meals as necessary, and according to the Civil Aviation Authority pay you compensation of up to €400 (£360).

  • From Cardiff to Holyhead: A race against Wales' longest train route
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    The Independent

    From Cardiff to Holyhead: A race against Wales' longest train route

    Our travel correspondent is making the most of the UK in August by taking on a challenge a day, and hopes that you might follow.Today: hitchhiking from Cardiff Central to Holyhead the pretty and unpredictable way in a race against Wales’ longest train journeyCaravans: yesterday, they tainted the sinuous beauty of the A470.If you do not yet know this magnificent trunk road, it is the closest there is to a Pan-Wales Highway. The A470 emerges from the congestion of Cardiff and the Valleys to challenge the contours of increasingly muscular mountains, swerving and swooping as it links towns and villages blessed – or cursed – by the exhilarating geography of Wales.But the consequence of making natural beauty accessible? Tourism. Most of it is benign. But for caravanners, immersion in some of Britain’s finest scenery seems to involve dragging around hundreds of cubic feet of fixtures, fittings and fresh air, all contained in a box on wheels.Such peripatetic paraphernalia might be suitable on an eight-lane interstate in Arizona. But in mid-Wales when two caravans with a combined width slightly greater than a particularly narrow stretch of the A470 converge, life on the road gets slow and messy,Normally, the hitchhiker takes it all in his or her chauffeur-driven stride. But yesterday I was a man with a mission, which did not allow for towing-related snarl-ups. My Monday adventure was a race against the train.At 7.21am, the first end-to-end train across Wales departs Cardiff Central, destination Holyhead. I was there to wave it off. Wales’s answer to the Trans-Siberian is the longest train ride in the country, and takes an average of five hours.Because of the way that the web of railways in Wales was reduced to a skeleton in the Sixties, the 7.21am takes a preposterously long route – I calculate almost 250 miles, compared with under 200 miles for the most direct road journey, using the A470. The train is ignominiously obliged to visit England twice, meandering through parts of Herefordshire, Shropshire and Cheshire. So even allowing for time spent by the roadside, I started the day with the belief I was in with a chance of reaching the western tip of Anglesey faster than the train.When you are thumbing, belief is worth nothing. You rely entirely on the kindness of strangers, and have absolutely no control over your destiny (or, often, your destination). But you can try to boost your chances. Rule one: invest to get clear of cities. Five minutes after I waved off the Trans-Wales Express, I hopped aboard a train, too. But unlike the train from Cardiff to Holyhead, the walk-up fare for the 7.26am to Merthyr Tydfil isn’t £93. It’s just £6 for a 25-mile flying start. Merthyr Tydfil’s forlorn single platform, lost amidst a shopping centre, was not always the end of the line. On the way up to the junction of the Heads of the Valleys road and the A470, you pass a grand sweep of viaduct that has been bereft of trains for half a century.​You pass it very quickly too, if you happen to be in a fast, comfortable car. Many drivers understandably regard their vehicle as their cocoon, providing splendid isolation from the world. Why would you ever let a complete stranger intrude?After decades of hitching I am still amazed that anyone stops. The motorist has a split-second to recognise that, even in 2019, someone is actually hitchhiking; decide if the person thumbing would make a pleasant companion or turn out to have personal hygiene issues and/or be an axe-murderer; and if they are deemed by the instantaneous evaluation to be worth helping, is there somewhere to stop safely without a 38-tonne truck intervening unhelpfully?I ticked none of the right boxes for the drivers during a 20-minute wait at an increasingly annoying roundabout. But then Mr Mercedes (he can be known only by that name for employment-contract reasons) pulled up.Mr M had been expecting me to be there, because a quarter-hour earlier he had driven past in the opposite direction and evidently was unimpressed by my technique. As he raced through the Brecon Beacons (caravanners are evidently not early starters), we talked of his cheeky and astonishingly successful self-upgrade on a Virgin Atlantic flight – another good reason to remain anonymous.At Brecon I had rather too long to muse that, by now, the passengers on the 7.21 were meandering through Shropshire at about 60mph. I was doing precisely 0mph, until John and Sally stopped in their Jaguar (yes!).They traded a lift through achingly beautiful landscapes for a rapid-fire series of answers to their travel questions.Ideal location for a family meet with four people from Sydney and four from London? Vancouver. Best airline to Australia from Gatwick? Qatar Airways assuming an Airbus A350 is on offer, otherwise Emirates’ all-A380 schedule. Optimum stretch of the Camino de Santiago? The one-day hike across the Pyrenees from St-Jean-Pied-de-Port in France to Roncesvalles in Spain. From where Sally and John deposited me in Dolgellau, Graham and Chris picked up the hitcher, and the theme. Chris doesn’t enjoy flying, and they have set a 2h30m maximum on flights. Faro in Portugal suits them just fine. Anywhere else? Stretch it to three-and-a-bit hours, and Corfu and Malta come into play.Chatting about Mediterranean islands while watching the sun and showers jostle amidst the mountains felt surreal. We brushed against the sea, at around the same time as the rail passengers were sweeping at 90mph around Colwyn Bay – the best coastal stretch of the Cardiff-to-Holyhead train.After Porthmadog, where Kyle and Emily took over the northward task, I felt downright uncomfortable. But that was understandable. They are visiting from the Australian state of Victoria, and had crammed a month’s worth of excess baggage into the smallest rental car in Christendom. I was squeezed into the back seat, which I shared with a case the size of a small caravan, and then they somehow compressed my luggage to fit the remaining space between my lap and the roof.Emily is a nurse. Kyle is a youth worker. They drive distances that would terrify you and I. On Tuesday morning they propose to climb Snowdon, then drive to Stirling in the afternoon. I thought I had mis-heard. Not the one in Scotland, surely? It was.Monday afternoon, though, was to be devoted to Caernarfon Castle. By now the 7.21am northbound Trans-Wales Express had become the 2.36pm southbound. And so I allowed myself the luxury that hitchhikers all too often deny themselves: exploring the places along the way.The world can sometimes resemble a sequence of roundabouts, truck-stops and lay-bys rather than a rich and rewarding collection of communities. So I made the most of Caernarfon, a town that waves across the waves of the Menai Strait at Anglesey, before what turned out to be the final lift.Jane was driving a Range Rover, making this an exceptional day for top-of-the-range cars. She was listening to House music at a volume sufficient to entertain me and the two terriers, Barbara and Tim, in the back.For the last 30 miles of an enriching day, I learned about her career in the music business, the benefits of employing teachers with different life experiences and the joy of the open road – with a 1980 Viking Fibreline in tow.By the time I reached Holyhead I was four hours behind schedule. And I didn’t care. At the end of a long and splendid day on the road, for the first time in my long hitching career, I had been picked up by someone towing a caravan.Humanity: marvellous.

  • 12 of the best travel products you never knew you needed
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    Jessica Morgan

    12 of the best travel products you never knew you needed

    You'll never leave the house without them

  • 48 hours in . . . Bath, an insider guide to this charming Georgian gem
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in . . . Bath, an insider guide to this charming Georgian gem

    Bath is a real head-turner – just walking its World Heritage streets can lift your spirits. The photogenic Georgian architecture has a warm, sunny glow, while the sweeping crescents and terraced Circus make your head spin. Its biggest draw, the Roman Baths complex, cleverly makes the most of the city’s ancient foundations, while the words of former resident Jane Austen bring more recent history to life.

  • Couple who stole sand from Sardinia beach face up to six years in jail
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    The Independent

    Couple who stole sand from Sardinia beach face up to six years in jail

    A couple on holiday in Sardinia face up to six years in jail after they stole some sand as a souvenir.The Italian island’s white-sand beaches are highly protected, with harsh penalties for those who try to remove any sand – from one to six years in jail for theft with the aggravating circumstance of having stolen an asset of public utility.The French couple were caught with 14 plastic bottles full of sand, weighing 40kg, in the boot of their car.They claim to have not known the practice was forbidden and had no idea they were committing an offence when they removed the sand from Chia in the south of Sardinia.The pair were about to board a ferry from Porto Torres to Toulon, France, according to local media.Some tourists take Sardinian sand to sell online, which is illegal and has been punishable by fines of up to €3,000 since 2017.Although taking sand from a beach may not sound like a big issue, local scientists say that the practice is extremely detrimental. Sardinian environmental scientist Pierluigi Cocco told the BBC that Sardinia’s sandy beaches, one of its main attractions, are under threat from both erosion and tourists removing the sand.“Only a fraction of the tourists visiting Sardinia spend their time digging up to 40kg of sand each,” he said. “But if you multiply half that amount times 5 per cent of the one million tourists per year, in a few years that would contribute significantly to the reduction of beaches.”It’s not the first time a tourist has been caught red-handed.In August last year, a 40-year-old Italian man who lives in the UK was fined €1,000 after police caught him in possession of a bottle of sand from Gallura beach on Sardinia’s north coast.

  • Telegraph Travel Awards 2019: Win a £42,000 stay in a luxury villa in Croatia
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    The Telegraph

    Telegraph Travel Awards 2019: Win a £42,000 stay in a luxury villa in Croatia

    Voting in the 2019 Telegraph Travel Awards is open, giving you the opportunity to reward those operators and destinations that continue to surpass your expectations. And because we recognise you need to invest time and energy to make these awards what they are, as a reward for your efforts we are offering you the chance to win one of 15 luxury holidays – including this five-night villa holiday in Croatia.

  • The most Instagrammable afternoon teas in England
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    Evening Standard

    The most Instagrammable afternoon teas in England

    The afternoon tea is as quintessentially British as the Queen driving in the countryside with a silk headscarf wrapped around her hair.But afternoon teas have evolved over the years to include more than coronation chicken sandwiches and scones. Now you can get halloumi-filled steamed buns, banoffee pie jars and mini slices of tiramisu.To celebrate Afternoon Tea Week, we’re rounding up some of the most Instagrammable (and decidedly delicious) afternoon teas in the country. Cliveden House, Berkshire> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by Cliveden House (@clivedenhouse) on Jul 7, 2019 at 7:16am PDTPerhaps best known as the stately home Meghan Markle chose to stay in the night before she became the Duchess of Sussex, Cliveden House also offers a stunning afternoon tea. Expect classics like scones with jam and clotted cream alongside heavenly finger sandwiches with the added twist of whatever theme they’re offering that month. For World Chocolate Day they served up a blood orange tart, white chocolate and coffee macaroon and milk chocolate and praline choux bun. Opt to eat outside to enjoy the sprawling views of the estate.clivedenhouse.co.uk/ Sketch, London> A post shared by sketch (@sketchlondon) on Feb 14, 2018 at 6:00am PSTIs any foodie Instagram-based list complete without a mention of Sketch? We think not, and luckily its delectable afternoon teas are just as visually delicious. On the current menu, you’ll find such delights as a foie gras tartlette and white peach and verbena cheesecake. If you’re looking to add a little fizz, you can have the champagne afternoon tea or the English spritzer afternoon tea. Either way, an afternoon tea in Sketch’s gallery is a must for any Instagram aficionado.sketch.london/ Holbeck Ghyll, Cumbria> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by Holbeck Ghyll (@holbeck_ghyll) on Mar 8, 2019 at 8:01am PSTThe Lake District always promises a picture perfect escape, so make the most of it this summer by visiting Holbeck Ghyll where you can find an equally picturesque afternoon tea. With wild boar and apple sausage rolls, hot smoked salmon with citrus crème fraiche, white chocolate profiteroles and scones, this will satisfy even the most ardent foodie.holbeckghyll.com/ Muriel's Kitchen, London> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by 𝐌𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐬 𝐊𝐢𝐭𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐧 (@murielskitchen) on Jun 2, 2019 at 6:37am PDTServed on miniature picnic tables, this afternoon tea is a pure delight. Think all the usual afternoon tea trimmings with the added touch of banoffee pie jars, brownie bites and carrot cakes.murielskitchen.co.uk/ Oh Me, Oh My, Liverpool> A post shared by OH ME OH MY (@ohmeohmy_liv) on May 15, 2018 at 4:33am PDTMerseyside’s hidden gem, Oh Me, Oh My’s rooftop gives you spectacular views over the city but it’s the afternoon tea that’s really worth the hype. Available weekdays from 12 to 2:30pm, the tuna, cucumber and lemon finger sandwiches are accompanied by white chocolate and raspberry crème brulees with banana and toffee eclairs. The perfect place to book for a special occasion.ohmeohmyliverpool.co.uk/ Dalloway Terrace, London> A post shared by Dalloway Terrace (@dallowayterrace) on Jun 6, 2018 at 4:33am PDTOne of the most Instagrammable restaurants in London , with its ever-changing terrace, it's also home to one of the capital’s most Instagrammable afternoon teas. The current offering – the elderflower afternoon tea – complements the summer décor and offers white elderflower parfaits next to gin smoked salmon and lemon crème fraiche finger sandwiches. Inspired by the French countryside, this afternoon tea is best enjoyed with a glass of sparkling wine.dallowayterrace.com/ Sugar Junction, Manchester> A post shared by Sugar Junction (@sugarjunctionnq) on Jul 2, 2018 at 8:41am PDTServing up a selection of freshly baked homemade cakes, scones and sandwiches, the Sugar Junction is a Mancunian afternoon tea institution. They also offer gluten free options so those with intolerances don’t miss out.sugarjunction.co.uk/ Jesmond Dene House, Newcastle> A post shared by Jesmond Dene House (@jesmonddenehouse) on Mar 2, 2018 at 7:40am PSTSit on the terrace, relax on a sofa in the cocktail bar or pull up a chair in the garden room and indulge in one of the best afternoon teas in the North East. Choose from a number of loose leaf teas to accompany the assorted finger sandwiches, scones and sweet treats – including strawberry and lemon macarons and a lemon cheesecake. Pair with a cocktail, novelty tea or a well-deserved glass of prosecco.jesmonddenehouse.co.uk/ The Assembly House, Norwich> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by Maryrisa (@afternoonteaqueen88) on Aug 11, 2019 at 11:15am PDTA towering Georgian gem in the serene centre of Norwich, the Assembly House’s afternoon tea makes for the ideal treat. Expect dainty ham sandwiches, savoury and sweet scones and colourful treats. They are currently serving an ‘Alice in Wonderland’-themed afternoon tea, complete with heart-topped pastries, rabbit holes and toothy smiles.assemblyhousenorwich.co.uk/ Miss V’s, Cornwall> A post shared by Miss V's (@miss_vs_cornwall) on Mar 7, 2018 at 4:17am PSTSet on the Roseland Peninsula, Miss V’s is the perfect sunny spot for a classic British afternoon tea. With scones, homemade cakes and treats all set on delightful china plates, make sure you pick up a couple of extra tart slices to take with you while you’re there.instagram.com/miss_vs_cornwall/ Terre A Terre, Brighton> A post shared by Terre a Terre (@terreaterrebrighton) on Jun 29, 2018 at 5:13am PDTBrighton’s iconic vegetarian restaurant offers up a show-stopping afternoon tea. The Terre à Tier Tea comes with a steamed rice bun stuffed with Szechuan marinated halloumi, mini muffins and a chocolate hazelnut truffle cake and praline served with a whipped dark chocolate mousse, among other treats.terreaterre.co.uk/ Amorino, London> A post shared by London Food, Drinks & Travel (@londonfoodbabes) on Aug 17, 2016 at 10:36am PDTFor something a little different and perfect for summer, Amorino – the gelato and sorbet specialist – offer an ice cream filled afternoon tea. Think gelato roses and gelato-filled macaroons and your choice of their 10 rich hot chocolates.amorino.com/ The Salt Room, Brighton> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by The Salt Room (@thesaltroombrighton) on Aug 4, 2019 at 4:15am PDTBilled as one of Brighton’s best seafood restaurants, The Salt Room has another claim in offering one of Brighton’s best afternoon teas. The sea-facing restaurant located along the waterfront offers a ‘taste of the pier’ afternoon tea, with chocolate pebbles, lemon meringue fudge, raspberry bark, candy floss and a strawberry and lime doughnut.saltroom-restaurant.co.uk/ Bardolino, Birmingham> A post shared by Bardolino Birmingham (@bardolino_bham) on Jun 20, 2018 at 10:00am PDTBardolino’s afternoon tea comes with an Italian twist, think parma ham rolls with avocado, bruschetta, beef sliders and tiramisu. The sweet potato fries and selection of teas and lemon tarts are perfect for a long weekday afternoon.mpwrestaurants.co.uk/

  • 48 hours on . . . the Amalfi Coast, an insider guide to the most seductive place in Italy
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours on . . . the Amalfi Coast, an insider guide to the most seductive place in Italy

    The Sorrentine peninsula pushes out into the Tyrrhenian sea like a gnarled finger, its southern shores blessed by some of the most spectacular coastal scenery in the world. Linking the towns is the SS163, the legendary Amalfi Coast Drive, a 16 km twisting, turning two-lane road that weaves and dips torturously in and out and up and down gorges, clinging to the cliff face from Positano to Amalfi. The background is lemon and olives groves, picture-perfect whitewashed villages and the ever-present shimmering blue sea.

  • 11 lavish spa hotels in Las Vegas, including artificial snow rooms and three acres of outdoor pools
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    The Telegraph

    11 lavish spa hotels in Las Vegas, including artificial snow rooms and three acres of outdoor pools

    Vegas spas are world famous, which makes sense: after a few days of indulging in food, drink, and gambling, a steam and a sweat is just what the doctor ordered. The best resorts on the Strip constantly try to outdo each other with bigger and better spas, many of which are exclusively accessible by hotel guests (some, however, conveniently offer day passes). If a first-class facial or Swedish massage is a top priority during your stay in Sin City, check out these recommended hotels.