Three in four Brits would quit their job if they were forced to work under 'poor management'

Abigail Fenton
·Writer
·2-min read
Despite three quarters of Brits saying they would switch jobs if they didn't like their manager, most think they have a 'good' boss. (Amy Hirschi/Unsplash)
Despite three quarters of Brits saying they would switch jobs if they didn't like their manager, most think they have a 'good' boss. Photo: Amy Hirschi/Unsplash

Most Brits would quit their current job if they disliked their manager, research suggests.

In a survey of 1,300 UK workers, three quarters (76%) admitted they would quit their job if they were forced to work under “poor management.”

However, the the majority (56%) actually think they have a “good” boss, the research by CV-Library found.

When it comes to the skills Brits consider “vital” in a good manager, good communication came in top, with nearly nine in 10 (85%) people citing it as important.

Meanwhile, honesty came in second place, with over half of UK workers saying it was an important trait for a manager to have.

Empathy for employees took third place, with 40% of workers feeling they couldn't work for a manager who wasn't understanding of their feelings and needs.

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Organisation came in fourth, with over a third (36%) of UK workers seeing it as an important managerial quality.

Problem-solving rounds out the top five, with a fifth of Brits saying it's important for a manager to be able to resolve issues.

“It’s no surprise that good communication and honesty top this list. Everyone deserves to be treated with respect in the workplace, and these two skills are fundamental for managers if they wish to lead effectively,” said Lee Biggins, founder and CEO of CV-Library.

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“Likewise, it’s also unsurprising that empathy is included in this list. Given the current state of affairs, it’s vital that managers are flexible in their approach to staff and make an effort to understand the difficulties their employees are facing.”

What’s more, while the majority of professionals are happy with their current boss, with only 24% of respondents claiming their manager lacked critical skills.

These include empathy, good communication, organisation, strategic thinking, decisiveness, problem-solving, honesty, confidence, creativity, and ability to delegate, the study found.

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Biggins said: “It’s worrying that a quarter of professionals feel their manager doesn’t exhibit any of these skills.

“If you feel your team leader is treating you poorly or holding back your progression, it’s imperative you raise this issue with another senior team member or the HR department.

“You’re entitled to adequate support and someone else within your organisation should be able to help.

“If you still aren’t receiving the right treatment, it may be time to move on.”

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