• Being vegetarian or vegan could 'lower heart disease risk but increase chance of stroke'
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Being vegetarian or vegan could 'lower heart disease risk but increase chance of stroke'

    A study found 20% higher rates of stroke in vegetarians and vegans.

  • Vegan takeaway orders have quadrupled since 2016, research reveals
    Style
    Danielle Fowler

    Vegan takeaway orders have quadrupled since 2016, research reveals

    Plant-based takeaway orders increased by 388% between 2016 and 2018.

  • KFC trials plant-based nuggets and wings in US
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    KFC trials plant-based nuggets and wings in US

    It has joined forces with Beyond Meat, a vegan food maker, to create this limited run of vegan food.

  • Vegan accuses meat-eater who likes to eat tofu of appropriating veganism
    Style
    Danielle Fowler

    Vegan accuses meat-eater who likes to eat tofu of appropriating veganism

    "Tofu is strictly for vegans and vegetarians."

  • The problem with ‘vegan leather’ – is it really more sustainable?
    Style
    The Independent

    The problem with ‘vegan leather’ – is it really more sustainable?

    The fashion industry is not one to jump on trends. It prefers to start them.But that’s not the case when it comes to vegan leather, a material that owes its zeitgeist stamp to the increasing popularity of plant-based diets and sustainable living.Because as more people reduce the amount of animal products on their plates, they’re beginning to take a similar approach to their wardrobes, prompting greater demand for “vegan” garments such as leather. And the brands that are taking note have flourished as a result.Earlier this week, shoe brand Dr Martens announced its profits had surged by 70 per cent in the year to the end of March thanks to the success of its vegan range of boots.The British label follows in the cruelty-free footsteps of Topshop and Adidas, both of whom have added vegan shoes to its collections in the last year. Meanwhile, labels that have always championed vegan leather, such as Veja, continue to be prosper among the street style set.Ethically, it makes sense to choose faux leather over the real thing, with animal rights campaigners pointing to the treatment of cattle that are farmed for beef and milk, of which leather is a byproduct. It's environmentally dubious too, given that no animal is reared purely for its leather and therefore producing it leads to greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation just like beef and milk production. And that's before you’ve considered the consequences of tanning leather. While methods have improved, there are still some tanneries around the world, such as in Bangladesh, that use noxious chemicals such as chromium to tan their leather, which are filled in giant vats and often dumped into rivers once the process is complete.But vegan leather is also problematic, least of all because the term itself is an oxymoron. “There is no such thing as vegan leather,” says Dr Kerry Senior, director at the UK’s leather trade federation, Leather UK. “The term leather is defined by British, European and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards and refers only to the skins or hides of animals, tanned to be imputrescible,” Senior tells The Independent, describing the phrase as an “abuse of the term leather” that continues to be a bugbear for those working in the leather trade.Amy Powney, creative director of sustainable luxury label Mother of Pearl, explains that most leather alternatives are made using synthetic materials, hence why she prefers to use real leather instead. “If you are buying faux leather then you need to consider you are buying plastic,” she tells The Independent, adding how she prefers to use “best practice leather” that is long-lasting and has been made using natural tanning agents.In October, Patrick Grant, creative director of Saville Row tailors Norton & Sons made a similar remark when he criticised eco-conscious brands such as Stella McCartney for "encouraging us to use plastic instead of leather".> There is no such thing as vegan leatherDr Kerry Senior, Leather UKPlastic polymers polyurethane (PU) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) are the most commonly used to produce faux leather fabrics thanks to their supple, vinyl and sometimes wrinkled texture. But both pose serious environmental threats given that they are usually manufactured from fossil fuels and are not biodegradable. Equally, these garments tend to have a short lifespan, meaning consumers may dispose of their faux leather items faster than a long-lasting hand-me-down, resulting in them being sent to landfill.Stella McCartney has admitted to using polyurethane and polyester as an alternative to leather in its products, which it says on its website are “not without concern”. But by using recycled polyester and producing garments that are not machine washable (meaning it avoids the issue of microfibre shedding), the brand claims to have a lower environmental impact than labels who choose to use real leather, citing a calculation from its Environmental Profit and Loss account. > View this post on Instagram> > Super-skinny Alter-Nappa boots with platform crepe soles, captured behind-the-scenes of the Winter 2019 Runway Show in Paris. ⁣ ⁣ Dedicated to the ones we love in the past, present and future. ⁣ ⁣ ThereSheGrows> > A post shared by Stella McCartney (@stellamccartney) on Mar 5, 2019 at 9:01am PSTThat said, like many others, the luxury British label is looking into new ways of producing faux leather fabrics that aren’t quite so environmentally questionable. These include lab-grown leather, which is being spearheaded by biofabrication companies such as Modern Meadow. Elsewhere, there’s Piñatex, a leather alternative made from the cellulose fibre of pineapple leaves that was recently used by H&M in its latest Conscious Collection.But there is development happening in the real leather trade as well.> Leather ticks all the boxes for a sustainable materialRachel Garwood, University of NorthamptonRachel Garwood, director at the Institute for Creative Leather Technologies at the University of Northampton, tells The Independent genuine leather is nowadays far more environmentally friendly than faux alternatives.“It ticks all the boxes for a sustainable material. The problem leather has is that it retains the stigma of historical production methods,” she says, pointing to contemporary methods used by modern tanneries – such as vegetable tanning – that are far less harmful than previous chemical-based processes involved in leather production.“Chemical companies and tanners are working closely with brands to offer reassurance of the clean technology and ethics in leather manufacturing,” Garwood adds, noting that various initiatives such as the Leather Working Group (LWG) rate tanneries on their environmental and ethical practices that help retailers and brands to better identify good practice in their supply chain.> View this post on Instagram> > Looking to complete your Nisolo collection? Our Summer Warehouse Sale begins tomorrow in Nashville. Follow @nisoloshowroom for live updates and consider a road trip to save on exclusive styles this weekend only. 📸: @stylethislife> > A post shared by Nisolo (@nisoloshoes) on Aug 9, 2019 at 10:40am PDTMatt Stockamp, impact associate at US-based footwear brand Nisolo, is constantly trying to improve his supply chain to ensure the leather he uses is ethically sourced and durable. “We know that a lot of our leather comes from farms in the US and northern Mexico,” he tells The Independent. “The majority of our tanneries are also certified by the LWG for their social and environmental practices, which includes a regular, thorough inspection of their water treatment facilities. Diving further into this is an ongoing priority of ours for 2019.” Nisolo’s leather products are designed to last for many years, Stockamp adds. “We’ll need to conduct thorough testing to make sure that any vegan materials also meet our brand’s standards for quality and longevity.”If you want to invest in a real, long-lasting leather garment but you’re not sure about the company’s supply chain, Leigh Mcalea, head of communications at anti-waste organisation Traid tells The Independent the best way forward it to forget about buying something new altogether. Instead, she advises championing circularity by making the most of the ample secondhand options available at charity and vintage shops: “Choosing secondhand displaces the loss of life to animals, environmental destruction and worker exploitation.”

  • Pret's giving out free vegan cookies on Friday: here's how to claim yours
    Style
    Danielle Fowler

    Pret's giving out free vegan cookies on Friday: here's how to claim yours

    Look no further for the perfect way to kick-start the weekend.

  • So Meghan Markle is probably a flexitarian not a vegan, but what does that mean?
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    So Meghan Markle is probably a flexitarian not a vegan, but what does that mean?

    People had previously wondered if she was a vegan.

  • Beer-flavoured tea bags now exist so you can enjoy a pint at your desk
    Style
    Danielle Fowler

    Beer-flavoured tea bags now exist so you can enjoy a pint at your desk

    The alcohol-free twist on the traditional cuppa is perfect for the summer months.

  • The rise of the vegan hotel
    Style
    Ellie Ross

    The rise of the vegan hotel

    Vegan travellers can now do everything from stay at an uber ethical hotel to book speciality food tours.

  • Sainsbury's is launching a meat-free butchers
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Sainsbury's is launching a meat-free butchers

    The style of the store will look like a traditional butchers, but the ‘meat’ on display will be that of vegan sausages and pulled jackfruit.

  • Former vegan in her 30s claims her plant-based diet brought on early menopause
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Former vegan in her 30s claims her plant-based diet brought on early menopause

    She was getting hot flushes and her periods had stopped.

  • Piers Morgan declares war on M&S’s new 100% vegetarian Percy Pig sweets
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Piers Morgan declares war on M&S’s new 100% vegetarian Percy Pig sweets

    "Go and get your own sweets."

  • ‘Bleeding’ vegan burger pioneers Moving Mountains to launch meat-free hot dog in London
    Style
    Evening Standard

    ‘Bleeding’ vegan burger pioneers Moving Mountains to launch meat-free hot dog in London

    The team behind the world’s first 'bleeding' vegan burger are set to launch a meatless hot dog at a diner in London next month. The restaurant will also run a half-price launch offer on the dog, which will cost curious diners just £6 (usual price £12) for the first weekend. The Frankfurter-style sausage is 10 inches long, and made using sunflower seeds as its main constituent, with carrots, onion, paprika and coconut oil.

  • The rise of vegan gardening
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    The rise of vegan gardening

    The plant-based movement is proving so popular, even our gardens are going vegan.

  • Wedding guest shames vegan who brought her own food to the reception
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Wedding guest shames vegan who brought her own food to the reception

    "Basically, the whole weekend revolved around her being vegan."

  • Tesco launches a vegan sausage roll – and it's cheaper than Greggs'
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Tesco launches a vegan sausage roll – and it's cheaper than Greggs'

    Watch out Greggs Tesco is coming for your vegan sausage roll crown.

  • Subway becomes the latest fast food chain to launch vegan menu
    Style
    Danielle Fowler

    Subway becomes the latest fast food chain to launch vegan menu

    The sandwich giant has added a vegan sub and salad to its world-famous menu.

  • 160,000 people sign petition calling for McDonald's to launch a vegan burger
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    160,000 people sign petition calling for McDonald's to launch a vegan burger

    More than 160,000 people have signed a petition encouraging McDonald's to launch a vegan burger.

  • Vegan and dairy-free Easter eggs to stock up on before the long weekend
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Vegan and dairy-free Easter eggs to stock up on before the long weekend

    Because avoiding milk and other animal products shouldn't have to ruin your Easter.

  • How to raise a vegan baby, like the Duke and Duchess of Sussex may do
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    How to raise a vegan baby, like the Duke and Duchess of Sussex may do

    Meghan and Harry are rumoured to want to raise their baby as a vegan.

  • Burger King jumps on meat-free bandwagon, launches vegan 'Whopper' burger
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Burger King jumps on meat-free bandwagon, launches vegan 'Whopper' burger

    It tastes just like meat, apparently.

  • Best vegan afternoon tea in London 2019
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Best vegan afternoon tea in London 2019

    Afternoon tea is a minefield for those trying to ditch the dairy and go vegan. From traditional tea rooms offering a plant-based twist to vegan vanguards heeding the cry for high tea, these are the best places to find vegan afternoon teas in London. The Diamond Jubilee Tea Salon at the world famous, Royal Warrant-stamped grocery store offers a vegan afternoon tea, as well as gluten- and dairy-free options too.

  • The backlash over the fish-eating vegan influencer shines a light on the dark side of Insta-fame
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    The backlash over the fish-eating vegan influencer shines a light on the dark side of Insta-fame

    ‘Fishgate’ has highlighted the risks of being a food influencer

  • Vegan fast food: The best plant-based dishes in McDonald’s, Burger King, Pizza Hut and more
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Vegan fast food: The best plant-based dishes in McDonald’s, Burger King, Pizza Hut and more

    It's no secret that "vegan" doesn't always have to mean "healthy". While once plant-based diets were synonymous with wellness and detoxing, they can be just as gloriously calorific and indulgent as any other — especially when it comes to fast food. From artisan restaurants to quirky street food vendors, London is full of fantastic meat and dairy-free junk food options — but if you’re out with friends, in a rush, or looking for somewhere to go in the early hours of the morning, these aren’t always an option.