• Heavy drinking adds four centimetres to your waistline, UCL study finds
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Heavy drinking adds four centimetres to your waistline, UCL study finds

    Heavy drinking adds four centimetres to your waistline, warns a new study. Researchers found excessive boozing into older age was linked to a 1.5 inch larger waist and increased risk of a stroke in men. It was also associated with higher blood pressure, poorer liver function and a higher body mass index (BMI) in later life. Scientists at University College London (UCL) studied 4,820 adults aged 59 to 83 - three-quarters of whom were men. Participants were split into groups depending on their lifetime drinking patterns. Heavy drinkers were identified using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT-C), a standard screening tool for GPs. The test assesses how often you drink, how much you drink, and how often you binge - have six or more drinks. Someone who has three or four drinks, four or more times a week, would score positive as a hazardous drinker. Participants completed the AUDIT-C retrospectively for each decade of their life from age 16 to 19, to 80 and over. The team then categorised their lifetime drinking into four groups: never hazardous drinker, former early hazardous drinker (stopped at age 50 or after), current hazardous drinker, and consistent hazardous drinker (during every decade of their life). More than half of drinkers had been hazardous at some point in their life - with 21 per cent current hazardous drinkers and 5 per cent consistent. Heavy drinkers were mainly men, predominantly white, and likely to be in senior level jobs. Results showed excessive alcohol consumption over a lifetime was linked to higher blood pressure, poor liver function, increased stroke risk, a larger waistline and BMI in later life. This was the case even if you stopped drinking heavily before you turned 50. Lifetime hazardous drinkers had significantly larger waistlines and BMI than those who had never been hazardous drinkers. Heavy drinkers who stopped aged 50 or after had a 1.17 centimetre larger waist than never hazardous drinkers. But current and consistent hazardous drinkers had a waistline that was 2.44 and 3.85 centimetres larger respectively. Stopping drinking at any point in life was likely to be beneficial to overall health. Study first author Dr Linda Ng said: "Alcohol misuse, despite the common perception of young people binge drinking, is common among older adults, with alcohol related hospital admissions in England being the highest among adults aged over 50. "Previous studies have focused on single snapshots of consumption, which has the potential to mask the cumulative effects of drinking. "This study raises awareness of the effect of alcohol consumption over the life-course." Dr Ng added: "This suggests that the longer adults engage in heavy drinking the larger their waistline in older age. That is why it is beneficial, along with other health benefits, that adults reduce heavy drinking earlier rather than later." Senior study author Professor Annie Britton said: "Despite high prevalence of stroke and liver disease steadily increasing in the United Kingdom, heavy drinking remains common among older adults. "Early intervention and screening for alcohol consumption, as part of regular check-ups, could help reduce hazardous drinking among this demographic." The findings were published in the journal Addiction.

  • Ready, Steady, Cook chef takes to social media to help shoppers struggling to cook from stripped supermarkets
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Ready, Steady, Cook chef takes to social media to help shoppers struggling to cook from stripped supermarkets

    A chef from Ready, Steady, Cook has been doling out cookery advice to self isolators running low on supplies and those struggling to cook with produce from bare supermarket shelves. Ellis Barrie, who runs restaurants The Marram Grass and Lerpwl, said that anyone who sends him a tweet with the ingredients they have in their cupboard will get a recipe from him or one of his colleagues on the BBC show. Many are having to go outside their comfort zones to feed their family as shops struggle to stock staples including pasta, chicken and eggs. Mr Barrie told The Telegraph that he wanted to be able to use his skills to help the community. He said: "I'm on the front line, it's where I'm best actually. I like being in the action in a crisis." The chef is also delivering meals to families in Anglesey from his restaurant, including sausage casseroles and roasted meat and fish. Cooking with sparse ingredients could be an opportunity, he said, adding: "If you are needing to self isolate and whatnot you can have a bit of fun while you're doing it, thinking about the food you're going to eat it gives you something to aim for, you can get your family involved "I've noted lots of small suppliers we should be supporting are putting out deliveries selling fresh veg so we shouldn't be just sticking to tins." Many have asked him for quick recipes, Mr Barrie added, but said that the one thing self isolators have in bulk is time. He explained: "People keep asking me for quick recipes but you're stuck in your house! Take your time, enjoy your cooking, learn to use a knife. Look on YouTube! "Of course there's Ready Steady Cook on at half four every day which is perfect during this time." Many chefs have been using their skills to help the community as the country goes into quarantine. Roger Jones, who runs Michelin star restaurant The Harrow at Bedwyn has delayed his retirement to deliver free meals to the vulnerable in his community.

  • Kate Beckinsale claims Harvey Weinstein shouted at and punished her for wearing suit on red carpet
    Celebrity
    The Telegraph

    Kate Beckinsale claims Harvey Weinstein shouted at and punished her for wearing suit on red carpet

    Kate Beckinsale has told of her "huge relief" at Harvey Weinstein's prison sentence after revealing she was "punished" by the former movie mogul. Weinstein, 67, was sentenced to 23 years in prison by a judge in New York after being convicted of assaulting a production assistant at his apartment in 2006, and third-degree rape of another woman in 2013. Prosecutors in Los Angeles have started the extradition process to bring the disgraced Hollywood film producer to California. Beckinsale, 46, posted an image of herself on Instagram at the 2001 movie premiere for Serendipity. She wrote: "We all refused to go because holding a premiere mere weeks after 9/11 with the city still smoking felt like the most insensitive, tone deaf, disrespectful idea possible. "But Harvey insisted. We flew into New York and somehow got through it. The next morning Harvey called me and asked if I would like to bring my less than two-year-old daughter to his house for a play date with his similar aged daughter. I said OK. "I turned up and he immediately called for his nanny to take the babies to another room to play. I went to go with them and he said: 'No, you wait here.' "The minute the door closed he started screaming 'you stupid f---ing c--t, you c--t you ruined my premiere.' "I had no idea what he was talking about and started to shake. "He said, 'If I am throwing a red carpet you get in a tight dress, you shake your ass, you shake your tits, you do not go down it looking like a f---ing lesbian you stupid f---ing c--t.' "The shock made me burst into tears. I tried to say, 'Harvey, the city is on fire. People are still looking for their relatives. None of us even felt the premiere was appropriate, much less coming out dressed like it's a bachelor party.' "He said, 'I don't care - it's my f---ing premiere and if I want p---y on the red carpet that's what I get."' Beckinsale said she "managed to get myself and my child out of there and yes that was one of many experiences I had that there was no recourse for, and falls under no felony. "But I was punished for it, and for other instances where I said 'no' to him for years, insidiously and seeming irreversibly." Beckinsale continued: "Hearing that he has gone to prison for 23 years is a huge relief to me on behalf of all the women he sexually assaulted or raped, and I hope will be a deterrent to that sort of behaviour in this and any other industry. "Having said that, the crimes that are not crimes, the inhumane bullying and sick covert abuse for which there is still no recourse no matter who you tell (and I did tell), these too need to go." Beckinsale previously told how a robed Weinstein offered her alcohol when she was just 17. Scores of women have accused Weinstein of sexual assault, and he was found guilty of two attacks following a high-profile trial in New York. One of the actresses who alleged he attacked her, Mira Sorvino, said on Twitter that she "cried tears of amazement" after he was sentenced. She tweeted: "I literally cried tears of amazement, gratitude that the justice system has worked on behalf of all of his victims today."

  • Coronavirus: 'Confused' GPs using catering aprons because they have not been given protective equipment
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Coronavirus: 'Confused' GPs using catering aprons because they have not been given protective equipment

    GPs are using catering aprons to treat patients presenting with coronavirus symptoms because they have not been issued the proper protective equipment, a doctor has said. Faye Kirkland, a BBC reporter who also works as a GP, told the BBC's Radio 4 Today programme GPs are also confused about who they should be treating at their surgery and who they shouldn't. She said: "Since the weekend I've been contacted by a number of GPs concerned about the current guidance. "There is clear guidance if you've been away in the past 14 days to a high risk area or if you've been in contact with someone with a known case of Covid-19. "But there is an increasing concern about those who have symptoms such as a fever or a cough but haven't been away or haven't had a known contact. "So I've been in contact with the Royal College of GPs and they're saying their members are experiencing some confusion about triage - so what patients they should be talking to on the phone and patients they should be bringing in and what steps GPs should be taking to manage these patients in the best way possible." Doctors are having to take matters in to their own hands in terms of their equipment too - with GPs using makeshift catering aprons as surgical gowns. She said: "Patients are calling 111, but they'll go through a whole set of questions. "And if they don't think they are at risk or don't fit the tightly-defined criteria for a swab then often those calls are passed to the GP and they might come and see the GP. "There's a difficulty in GPs in knowing. For the vast majority of patients - they can be spoken to on the phone. But there are circumstances whereby the patients will need to be examined. "I've heard of GPs trying to see those patients at the end of a list so they can be seen together, seeing patients and trying to use catering aprons to protect themselves because they haven't got the correct equipment." Equipment has not been widely shared among GPs, Dr Kirkland said. "I've heard from GPs desperately trying to contact the Public Health England and they're being passed to NHS England then to the local commissioning group," she told the BBC. "There has been a promise to get that in hopefully early next week. "But at the moment GPs are left in this position of trying to do things themselves but they need guidance on how to manage this." The Telegraph has learned that GPs were written to by NHS England on March 5 updating doctors on the Covid-19 situation. In the four-page letter, it stated 400 general use aprons, 300 pairs of examination gloves and 300 face masks, will be issued early next week to all practices. An NHS spokesman said: "In the first of a series of regular updates, the NHS has written to all GP practices across the country informing them that hundreds of protective kits would be sent to them from this week, with larger surgeries receiving repeat deliveries to ensure they are well stocked. "Anyone with concerns about coronavirus can use the NHS 111 online service, and while the 111 phone line is understandably busy, and people may have to wait longer than usual, all enquiries are being responded to thanks to hard working NHS staff."

  • HRT helps ward off heart disease in middle aged women, US study shows
    Health
    The Telegraph

    HRT helps ward off heart disease in middle aged women, US study shows

    Hormone replacement therapy could help to ward off heart disease in middle aged women, a new study has shown. Scientists say that starting oestrogen steroid therapy within six years of the onset of menopause could help prevent clogged arteries and reduce cholesterol. Researchers in the US found the hormone oestradiol helped avoid atherosclerosis - a potentially serious condition where arteries become clogged with fatty substances called plaques. Oestradiol is a female sex hormone and a form of oestrogen often prescribed to treat the symptoms of menopause and to prevent osteoporosis. Women who took the hormone showed healthier arteries and were less at risk of cardiovascular problems. Study lead author Dr Roksana Karim from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles said: "Atherosclerosis is a major cause of heart disease, and cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall is the predominant characteristic of atherosclerosis. "Our results show that oestradiol initiated earlier in menopause reduces atherosclerosis and appears to do so by directly reducing cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall."

  • Konnie Huq’s plea to schools: Promote female science  role models
    Science
    Evening Standard

    Konnie Huq’s plea to schools: Promote female science role models

    Former Blue Peter presenter Konnie Huq today urged schools to promote the achievements of female scientists to encourage more girls to follow careers in engineering, science and technology.Ms Huq, the longest-serving female presenter of the BBC show, was set for a career in science before she broke into television.

  • Giorgio Armani cancels Milan Fashion Week show over coronavirus fears
    Style
    The Telegraph

    Giorgio Armani cancels Milan Fashion Week show over coronavirus fears

    Giorgio Armani is holding his Milan Fashion Week runway show behind closed doors on Sunday due to concerns raised by the coronavirus, and instead stream the event from inside the empty showroom. The fashion house said in a statement early Sunday that ''the decision was taken to safeguard the well-being of all his invited guests by not having them attend crowded spaces". A dozen towns in northern Italy have gone on effective lockdown after the deaths of two people infected with the new virus from China. Milan is the capital of Italy's Lombardy region, which reported 54 confirmed cases. The rest of Milan's runway shows scheduled for Sunday are to go ahead as planned, fashion officials confirmed. The Italian National Fashion Chamber said in a statement there were no indications from health officials that changes were necessary. It said it was up to individual brands to decide if they would go ahead. Armani announced overnight that as a precaution, his runway show on Sunday would be conducted in an empty showroom and streamed for the fashion public on the internet. It was the first time the 45-year-old Milan fashion house has taken such a step out of public health concerns.

  • Female domestic abuse survivors '44 per cent more likely' to die from any cause
    News
    The Independent

    Female domestic abuse survivors '44 per cent more likely' to die from any cause

    Women who have been subjected to domestic abuse are 44 per cent more likely to die from any cause than the wider population, a new study has found.Researchers at the University of Warwick and Birmingham discovered domestic abuse survivors are at increased risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  • Wales joins Scotland in banning smacking of children
    Politics
    The Telegraph

    Wales joins Scotland in banning smacking of children

    The Welsh Assembly has voted to introduce a smacking ban in Wales.

  • Robo-heart could solve organ transplant crisis
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Robo-heart could solve organ transplant crisis

    A soft robotic heart which would end the need for donor transplants, could be available within a decade, after scientists set out plans to build a hybrid organ from stem cells and biotech.

  • World Health Organisation: E-cigarettes are harmful to health and are not safe
    Health
    The Telegraph

    World Health Organisation: E-cigarettes are harmful to health and are not safe

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) has issued its strongest warning to date about e-cigarettes, claiming they increase the risk of heart disease and lung disorders.

  • Do we like being touched? BBC launches biggest ever study to find out in wake of #MeToo movement
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Do we like being touched? BBC launches biggest ever study to find out in wake of #MeToo movement

    The biggest ever study into touch will find out whether millennials want less physical contact than previous generations, following modern movements like MeToo.

  • Meghan Markle: Palace ‘reconsidering Duchess of Sussex title over punctuation confusion’
    Entertainment
    The Independent

    Meghan Markle: Palace ‘reconsidering Duchess of Sussex title over punctuation confusion’

    Buckingham Palace is reportedly reconsidering the royal title of Meghan, Duchess of Sussex because the punctuation is the same as in the titles of women who have divorced royal men.After announcing Prince Harry and Meghan would be stepping away from the front lines of the royal family, palace insiders were left scrambling to decide how to balance the couple’s titles against their desire for a more private life.

  • Chinese New Year 2020: Rats, luck and why you should avoid medicine, laundry and crying children
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Chinese New Year 2020: Rats, luck and why you should avoid medicine, laundry and crying children

    Chinese New Year is fast approaching – and with it comes a host of superstitions that will apparently dictate how the next 12 months will play out for each of us.

  • Activity monitors could predict flu outbreaks up to three weeks earlier, study suggests
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Activity monitors could predict flu outbreaks up to three weeks earlier, study suggests

    Activity monitors can predict flu outbreaks up to three weeks earlier than current surveillance methods raising hopes that health services could be better prepared for upcoming waves of illness.

  • Crisps and processed ham: school packed lunches as unhealthy as they were ten years ago
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Crisps and processed ham: school packed lunches as unhealthy as they were ten years ago

    Children’s packed lunches are no healthier than they were 10 years ago, with processed ham sandwiches and packets of crisps still the norm, new research shows.

  • Sandringham summit: Meghan Markle might join Queen’s crunch talks by phone after leaving for Canada
    Entertainment
    The Independent

    Sandringham summit: Meghan Markle might join Queen’s crunch talks by phone after leaving for Canada

    Meghan Markle is expected to join the Queen’s crunch talks about her and Prince Harry’s future roles by phone after returning to Canada.The monarch has called Harry, his brother Prince William, and their father Prince Charles to a crisis meeting at her private Norfolk estate of Sandringham where the “next steps” for the couple will be decided on Monday.

  • ‘What are Harry and Meghan thinking?’: How the world’s newspapers reported Sussexes stepping back from royal family
    Entertainment
    The Independent

    ‘What are Harry and Meghan thinking?’: How the world’s newspapers reported Sussexes stepping back from royal family

    The Duke and Duchess of Sussex prompted headlines across the world with the announcement they would “step back as ‘senior’ members of the royal family” on Wednesday.An announcement made by the couple on Instagram instantly gave rise to widespread reports of disgruntlement among family members, with the Queen said to be “furious” at not being consulted prior to the decision.

  • Absence may make the heart grow fonder for couples who choose to live apart, study finds
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Absence may make the heart grow fonder for couples who choose to live apart, study finds

    Absence may actually make the heart grow fonder, according to research, which shows a quarter of couples now live apart but abide by the same rules as married or cohabiting partners.

  • New DNA tests mean babies and children can be diagnosed with rare diseases in just days
    Health
    The Telegraph

    New DNA tests mean babies and children can be diagnosed with rare diseases in just days

    The NHS is promising a “genomic revolution,” with rare child diseases diagnosed in days, with far more accuracy than has previously possible.

  • NHS slimming classes see 90,000 Britons lose average of five pounds
    Health
    The Telegraph

    NHS slimming classes see 90,000 Britons lose average of five pounds

    NHS slimming classes have seen almost 90,000 overweight Britons lose an average of almost five pounds each.

  • Quest for the perfect smile is putting Instagram generation at risk
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Quest for the perfect smile is putting Instagram generation at risk

    A generation growing up on social media is putting its teeth at risk by turning to illegal providers of whitening and straightening products, dentists have warned.

  • New Year’s Eve: What are the lyrics to Auld Lang Syne?
    Entertainment
    The Independent

    New Year’s Eve: What are the lyrics to Auld Lang Syne?

    “Auld Lang Syne” is sung on the stroke of midnight every 31 December to ring in the New Year.The song sets words written by the great Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1788 to a traditional folk tune, its title translating into standard English as “old long since”, meaning “long ago”.

  • Children are getting far more caffeine from tea than energy drinks
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Children are getting far more caffeine from tea than energy drinks

    Children are getting four times as much caffeine from drinking tea, as from energy drinks, a think tank has said, as it attacks Government plans to ban the sale of the soft drinks to minors.

  • Avoid New Year fad diets that damage the heart and cause unwanted pregnancy, top NHS doctor warns
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Avoid New Year fad diets that damage the heart and cause unwanted pregnancy, top NHS doctor warns

    The most senior doctor in the NHS has warned against “teatoxes” and other fad New Year diets that can cause serious health problems.