• News
    AOL

    Cargo ships collide head-on in large canal in Canada

    This was the moment two cargo ships collided in the Welland Canal, Ontario on Saturday. Footage shows both vessels slowly approaching and a loud thud as they hit each other. The filmer Alex Stewart said: "I wasn't expecting this for my

  • Where to stay in Hong Kong – the safest districts (and places to avoid) when you can travel again
    News
    The Telegraph

    Where to stay in Hong Kong – the safest districts (and places to avoid) when you can travel again

    Following nearly six months of successfully managing coronavirus, resulting in just eight deaths in a city of 7.4 million, and virtually no local transmission for over two months, Hong Kong has seen a sudden surge of over 200 cases during the last week. Social distancing measures which had been carefully relaxed over May and June have been reimposed and include mandatory mask wearing on public transport, reducing group gatherings from 50 back down to four, and halting dine-in services at cafés and restaurants. Schools have also been closed, as have gyms and karaoke bars. Citizens have been asked to work from home where possible, although hotels and shopping malls remain open.

  • Why I'll be heading to this German medispa to lose my lockdown inches
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Why I'll be heading to this German medispa to lose my lockdown inches

    So according to today’s Telegraph, if we’ve got a waist of less than 88cm, we stand less chance of catching coronavirus. Which is great news if you’re naturally svelte, but if you’ve spent lockdown mainlining wine and cake, this news is likely to be sending you into a lardy tailspin.

  • The best boutique hotels in the Lake District
    Lifestyle
    The Independent

    The best boutique hotels in the Lake District

    When it comes to being almost irresponsibly good looking, The Lake District has easy-on-the-eye down to a fine art. Bursting with bucolic mountain tarns and rugged windswept fells, these picture-perfect lands – a collection of blustery Cumbrian counties bordered by the Pennines and the Irish sea – have provided inspiration for Romantic poets and children’s authors alike.Still as captivating as ever, this Unesco heritage site is also home to some of the most splendid boutique hotels in the UK. Here’s our pick of the best.

  • Sport
    AOL

    Pros versus blows: Surfers, divers and gymnasts

    This compilation of amateur clips shows expert weightlifters, divers and surfers alongside similar footage of those that are yet to master the same skills. Gasp at the physical feats achieved by the pros and wince and the rather unfortunate

  • Swing rescue
    News
    AOL

    Swing rescue

  • Ryanair cuts 1,000 UK-Ireland flights in August and September
    News
    The Independent

    Ryanair cuts 1,000 UK-Ireland flights in August and September

    Europe’s biggest budget airline has cancelled 1,000 flights between the UK and Ireland in August and September, blaming what it calls the republic’s “defective quarantine restriction on EU visitors”.Ryanair claims Ireland “is now suffering unrecoverable losses, as arriving EU passengers are forced to quarantine even while the border to Northern Ireland remains wide open with no such quarantines”.

  • Miriam Margolyes: 'We have to stop thinking of ourselves as the dominant nation'
    Entertainment
    The Telegraph

    Miriam Margolyes: 'We have to stop thinking of ourselves as the dominant nation'

    In the latest episode of ‘Postcards’, Greg Dickinson catches up with actor Miriam Margolyes who shares tales of Australia, her time on the Real Marigold Hotel and village life in Tuscany.

  • Keeping middle seat empty on flights almost halves risk of coronavirus infection, claims study
    Business
    The Independent

    Keeping middle seat empty on flights almost halves risk of coronavirus infection, claims study

    Deliberately keeping the middle seat empty on flights could almost halve the risk of catching coronavirus, a new paper has claimed.The chances of becoming infected with Covid-19 during a flight drop from about 1 in 4,300 as of early July 2020 to about 1 in 7,700, according to Arnold Barnett, George Eastman professor of management science and statistics at MIT Sloan School of Management.

  • Russians exploit travel loophole for Mediterranean beach breaks
    News
    The Independent

    Russians exploit travel loophole for Mediterranean beach breaks

    Russians desperate for a summer holiday are exploiting a loophole that enables them to evade lockdown restrictions at home in search of Mediterranean beaches abroad.Travellers keen for a summer sun fix are reportedly taking advantage of the soft border between Russia and Belarus to the east of the country.

  • Lifestyle
    AOL

    Teen gets rescued by fire fighters after getting lodged in a baby swing

    Story and video from SWNS This is the moment a mortified teenager had to be rescued by firefighters after she got stuck in a baby swing while filming a TikTok video. Layani Maclean, 14, was at the local park with her pals and was filming a clip

  • Great Escape: Why a close-to-home countryside hotel provided the perfect post-lockdown break
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Great Escape: Why a close-to-home countryside hotel provided the perfect post-lockdown break

    As the Telegraph Travel team embraced our Great Escape, trying out the 'new normal' and travelling to hotels, guest houses and campsites in the furthest reaches of the UK, my own started a little closer to home.

  • A postcard from Somerset, where normality is flickering through
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    A postcard from Somerset, where normality is flickering through

    What post-lockdown travel looks like in the county, from social distancing in pubs to contact-free check-ins

  • What the new face mask rules mean for your summer staycation
    News
    The Telegraph

    What the new face mask rules mean for your summer staycation

    Face coverings must be worn in all shops in England – but what are the protocols elsewhere in the UK? Planning a day trip or staycation in the UK this summer? Then you had better remember to pack your face mask. After months of dithering and debating their effectiveness, the Government has announced that face coverings will be mandatory in all shops in England from July 24. The news brings the country more in line with the policies of Spain, Italy and Germany, but raises further questions. A mask will soon be required if you want to buy a loaf of bread, but do you also need to wear one when going to the beach, or sitting in a pub garden? And how do the rules differ in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland? Here, we've compiled the rules and etiquette surrounding face masks throughout the four nations. England As noted above, face coverings will be mandatory in all shops from July 24. Anyone caught without a mask will face a fine of £100 (reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days). Children under 11 and those with certain medical conditions will be exempt from the rule. However, patrons at restaurants, pubs and cafés will not have to wear face masks. When discussing the new measures for shops, environment secretary George Eustice said that coverings are an "appropriate mitigation" against the risk of Covid-19, but that the rule would not work for hospitality businesses. Masks are not mandatory at hotels and campsites either. Going forward, it is worth checking with the establishment as they could introduce their own policy (though this would not be legally binding). Some hotels in Italy, for example, require coverings to be worn anytime you step outside your room. Face masks have been required on public transport (specifically buses, trains, ferries and planes) since June 15 and it is worth noting that many taxi firms, such as Uber and Addison Lee, have also put in place their own rules requiring passengers to wear masks. Unlike in parts of Spain, masks are not required to be worn in National Parks or on beaches, though they will no doubt be more commonplace in these settings as people become accustomed to wearing them while running errands and travelling to work. There is no doubt that there is an ambivalent attitude to face masks in the UK compared with other countries. A recent YouGov poll found that only 36 per cent of people in Britain wear face masks when in public whereas this figure is 83 per cent in Italy and 86 per cent in Spain. Many Asian countries, such as China and Vietnam, where there is much more familiarity with face masks, show similarly high levels of compliance. Scotland Up in Scotland, it has been a requirement to wear face masks in shops since July 10. Those who don’t comply can be fined £60 (reduced to £30 if paid within 28 days), though it has been reported that no fines were issued on the first weekend the rule came into action. When announcing the measure, Nicola Sturgeon told Scotland that wearing the coverings should become “as normal as putting on a seat belt.” As in England, coverings must be worn on public transport and the rule extends to taxis. No explicit rules have been issued for reopening restaurants and hotels, though it is understood that this remains under review. Wales Wales has been slower to introduce face masks than other parts of the UK, but they will be required on public transport and in taxis from July 27. First minister Martin Drakeford has also said that they should be worn in any situation where social distancing was not possible. He specified that the coverings should be three layers thick. However, the Welsh Government has stopped short of making masks mandatory in other public places. On this point, Mr Drakeford said: "The advice is that if places are crowded then face coverings are advisory. Where places are not crowded it is a matter for the individual citizen to make that decision." Northern Ireland Donning a face mask on public transport became mandatory in Northern Ireland on July 10. Those with certain medical conditions and children under 13 are exempt. Meanwhile, making masks mandatory in shops is apparently ‘under review’. No plans have been announced regarding hospitality businesses.

  • Boris Johnson criticised on Twitter for 'not removing his face mask properly'
    News
    AOL

    Boris Johnson criticised on Twitter for 'not removing his face mask properly'

    Boris Johnson has been criticised on social media for apparently failing to remove his face mask properly. Twitter users said the prime minister had demonstrated how not to take a mask off. It has emerged that wearing a face mask in shops and

  • Homesick student cycles from Scotland to Greece after flights home cancelled due to coronavirus
    Lifestyle
    The Independent

    Homesick student cycles from Scotland to Greece after flights home cancelled due to coronavirus

    A 20-year-old student cycled from Scotland to Greece in 48 days after his flight back home was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.Kleon Papadimitriou, an engineering student at Aberdeen University, decided to cycle the 2,175 miles to his home in Athens after three of his flights were cancelled.

  • 10 wild swimming escapes in Britain
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    10 wild swimming escapes in Britain

    Inspired by Roger Deakin’s wild swimming classic ‘Waterlog’, here's a ‘frog’s eye view’ of Britain at favourite locations from the book

  • Frustration on popular Caribbean island over travel corridor snub
    News
    The Telegraph

    Frustration on popular Caribbean island over travel corridor snub

    The Dominican Republic is one of the most popular Caribbean destinations for British holidaymakers, with 160,000 visitors from the UK last year. By regional standards the country has been hard hit by Covid-19, with nearly 42,000 confirmed cases and 864 deaths according to the latest figures. But in proportion to the country's population of around 10.8 million, the number of cases and fatalities per capita are far lower than in the UK.

  • East Bohemia may be stuck in the 1970s, but it still has the edge on the UK
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    East Bohemia may be stuck in the 1970s, but it still has the edge on the UK

    I might as well come clean and say that my experience of the lockdown has not been all that onerous. I haven’t been shielding a vulnerable loved one, as many have – my sister among them – and I haven’t been cooped up in a flat.

  • Here in South Africa, face masks are mandatory, there's a curfew – and booze and fags are banned
    News
    The Telegraph

    Here in South Africa, face masks are mandatory, there's a curfew – and booze and fags are banned

    Addressing the nation on Sunday July 12, as Covid-19 infections in South Africa surged, President Cyril Ramaphosa left no time for frantic stockpiling: “In order to conserve hospital capacity... we’ve now decided that the sale, the dispensing and the distribution of alcohol will be suspended with immediate effect.” Even as South African Twitter went into meltdown, there was – amongst the sensible, anyway – an understanding of why this measure is necessary.

  • Is 60 too old to learn to ski? Nik Kershaw says not
    Sport
    The Telegraph

    Is 60 too old to learn to ski? Nik Kershaw says not

    I managed to get to the age of 60 without strapping on a pair of skis. For most of my life, I suffered the ignominy of having to bail out of conversations when someone mentioned their ski trip, leaving me feeling rather inadequate. Skiing just seemed like a completely different world – one far out of my comfort zone with my rubbish balance and dodgy knees. More to the point, I’m a complete coward when it comes to doing things I think I’m going to fail at, so I have always managed to find a way to avoid the slopes. But in April 2018, a month after my 60th birthday, some friends booked a chalet in Champagny-en-Vanoise, France, and invited us along. There were four other families going with their kids, and my wife, a keen skier, persuaded me to go. I was dragged along, kicking and screaming, placated with the promise of being able to hang out by the pool while they skied. I thought it would be a good chance to hang out with the kids, play some games, and read a book. It didn’t quite work out that way though. As a surprise, my wife booked me two skiing lessons. I was totally dreading them because I’m a bit of a control freak and get very nervous when I don’t know what I’m doing. Of course, I’d never so much as been in a ski shop before, and I remember wrangling my feet into uncomfortable boots and thinking, “This is just awful”. Then there was the gondola to go up the hill: I didn’t know you were supposed to leave your skis on the outside, so I crammed in with them, earning me some funny looks. Things got worse when I arrived at the lesson to find that the other guy learning with me was a fit-looking 30-year-old from Portugal. I thought he was going to be amazing, flying about all over the place while I spent the whole time on my backside. But within half an hour, I had both skis on and I hadn’t fallen over for a few minutes. I had a sudden moment where I thought, “OK, I can do this.” It was exhilarating, and the rest of the two-hour lesson flew by. From that moment, I was hooked and couldn’t believe I’d wasted so many years avoiding skiing. When it’s going well, there’s no feeling like it – it’s almost like flying. By the end of the week, we hadn’t seen much of my 10-year-old son, Theo, except for his ski school snaking its way down the mountain. On the last day, we had the chance to ski together, and I was a bit full of it after a week on the slopes. At the top of the mountain, I said: ‘“Theo, when we get to the top, you follow Daddy, and Mummy will be right behind you.” I just remember seeing a blur as he shot past me, completely fearless. He went straight down, with no turns at all and I knew there was no way I could catch up with him without breaking my neck. Since then, we’ve been skiing every February to Zauchensee in Austria. Theo has become an amazing little skier, zooming around the mountain like a maniac. I’ve gone from strength to strength – I’m doing blues, reds and the occasional accidental black, though never very speedily. But I feel like I’ve discovered a world I didn’t know existed. I find my stress just melts away on the slopes. I’ve tried mindfulness before but I get too easily distracted. With skiing, it takes you out of yourself and you forget the other stuff. I’m not on the phone, I’m not thinking about the trials and tribulations of what’s going on at home, or my next gig. All there really is to think about is being in the moment, getting down this little bit of slope or around the next bend. Next year we have three ski trips planned, virus permitting. It’s good for me to get outdoors because I spend far too much time in front of a computer or sitting in a room on my own and thinking of a rhyme for “banana”. It’s not the standard thing to learn to ski at 60, and I’m quite proud of myself. It’s corny, but it’s true: apparently you can teach an old dog new tricks after all. I obviously didn’t know what I was missing and I really do wish that I’d started this about 40 years ago. Learning to ski has improved my confidence enormously and made me think about the things I used to say no to. Previously, I was a glass-half-empty kind of guy, but that’s changed now. I used to shy away from things that looked too hard and avoid taking on anything with too many obstacles in the way. But now I just get stuck in, and often I discover that things look harder from the outside than they actually are. Next on my list? It might even be a skydive. As told to Rosie Hopegood: These Little Things by Nik Kershaw is out now

  • Quarantine: What are the latest rules and what do they mean for my holiday plans?
    News
    The Independent

    Quarantine: What are the latest rules and what do they mean for my holiday plans?

    As the obligation for all travellers to the UK to self-isolate begins to ease, there is widespread confusion about what the rules mean – and the differences between the nations of the UK.This is the latest picture.

  • What you probably didn't know about the storming of the Bastille
    News
    The Telegraph

    What you probably didn't know about the storming of the Bastille

    France’s national day, July 14, celebrates the 1789 seizing of the Bastille, which kicked off the French revolution. Or not. The story isn’t quite as clear as that suggests. Here are 21 things you might not have known about the turning point in French history.

  • What to pack to stay safe from coronavirus on holiday
    Health
    The Independent

    What to pack to stay safe from coronavirus on holiday

    Summer holidays may be back on the menu, but it’s understandable to have concerns about safety before leaving home. Whether you’re jetting off to sunnier climes or looking forward to a staycation, we’ve rounded up the essential items to pack to help keep you and your loved ones safe.Hand sanitiser Cleaning hands regularly is one of the best ways to protect yourself from coronavirus (istock) Hand sanitiser is now the accessory de rigueur for anyone concerned about their health and the wellbeing of those around them. While thorough hand washing with soap is the most effective way to neutralise germs, this isn’t always an option when travelling. How frequently you sanitise your hands is up to you, but after using the toilet and before eating or preparing food is the bare minimum. Make sure your sanitiser contains at least 60 per cent alcohol, the minimum required to be effective against viruses.

  • What to do if you get coronavirus symptoms while on holiday
    Health
    The Independent

    What to do if you get coronavirus symptoms while on holiday

    The government lifting of travel restrictions for 59 countries has been met with enthusiasm by many and relief from within the sector. While travel might be easier now, the risk from Covid-19 has not disappeared. We look at what to do if you develop coronavirus symptoms on holiday.What symptoms should I look out for? According to the NHS, the three main symptoms to look out for are a high temperature, a new continuous cough, or a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste.