• Meet Dino Sagani, a fourth generation captain and the latest star of The Cruise
    Style
    The Telegraph

    Meet Dino Sagani, a fourth generation captain and the latest star of The Cruise

    With popular TV show The Cruise back on our screens, Sally Howard talks to the captain who has become one of its latest stars

  • More people are using cars and taxis to reach key London airports than public transport
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    The Independent

    More people are using cars and taxis to reach key London airports than public transport

    The number of travellers using public transport to get to key London airports has fallen between 2012 and 2016, according to a new report. The data, from transport consumer group London TravelWatch, shows that more people now either drive or get a taxi to catch a flight from Heathrow, Gatwick and Luton airports. The report, Way to go: Improving public transport access to London’s airports, shows that the share of passengers using public transport to get to Heathrow, Gatwick and Luton airports has fallen from 41 per cent, 44 per cent and 33 per cent respectively in 2012 to 39.1 per cent, 43.6 per cent and 31.4 per cent respectively four years later.

  • The bluest places in the world to add to your bucket list
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    Yahoo Style UK team

    The bluest places in the world to add to your bucket list

    From the gram-worthy tiles in Porto to the chic Yves Saint Laurent garden, these are the bluest spots across the globe to add to your bucket list.

  • 48 hours in . . . Buenos Aires, an insider guide to the tango capital of the world
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in . . . Buenos Aires, an insider guide to the tango capital of the world

    Queen of the Plate, Paris of the South, Tangopolis: the nicknames reveal why Buenos Aires doesn't disappoint. A beguiling conflation of European historic outpost and contemporary Latin American sprawl, BA – as expats call it – was once the capital of one of the world's wealthiest nations. Its French and Italianate buildings, graceful plazas and cultural life are the envy of most Old World cities. Thirteen million people live in Greater BA, its suburbs fanning out into the surrounding pampas.

  • What the Flybe buy-out means for passengers – and staff
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    The Independent

    What the Flybe buy-out means for passengers – and staff

    In case you haven’t noticed, it is a fairly horrible time to be a budget airline. The final discovery as I trawled through the details of the deal: Virgin Atlantic has been a “bona-fide potential offeror” for Flybe for a couple of months.

  • De-icing trains deployed across UK to keep travellers moving
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    The Independent

    De-icing trains deployed across UK to keep travellers moving

    Special snow-busting trains will be deployed across the UK in a bid to minimise disruption for travellers during the cold weather. Arctic temperatures are set to sweep the country this weekend, which usually means widespread transport chaos. Network Rail will operate a winter fleet, complete with trains fitted with snowploughs able to clear eight inches of snow, as well as hot air blowers, steam jets, brushes, scrapers and anti-freeze to clear snow and ice from the train tracks.

  • The bizarre Turkish ghost town of abandoned Gothic 'castles'
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    The Telegraph

    The bizarre Turkish ghost town of abandoned Gothic 'castles'

    You could probably argue that the mind of the architect has never dreamed up a style of building quite as romantic as the Gothic fortress. There is something about its points and precision - sharp turrets pointing towards the heavens, a room at the top perfect for a trapped princess or a fairytale character in some curious peril - that sings across the centuries. What, after all, is the Cinderella Castle - the fibreglass fantasy which adorns Disney theme parks across the planet - but a modern evocation of this grand design?

  • Eight auspicious destinations to celebrate Chinese New Year
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    The Independent

    Eight auspicious destinations to celebrate Chinese New Year

    The most important festival in the Chinese cultural calendar means that in mainland China alone, a mind-boggling three billion trips are made in the planet’s largest annual human migration. Here are eight (a lucky number seen everywhere at New Year) places to experience and celebrate the arrival of the year of the pig in true local style. There are few better places to welcome in Chinese New Year than Hong Kong.

  • Eight things I learnt after visiting London's Scientology centre
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    The Telegraph

    Eight things I learnt after visiting London's Scientology centre

    Walk along Queen Victoria Street, just around the corner from St Paul’s Cathedral, and you will see a chalkboard in the middle of the pavement. It doesn’t say something zany like ‘Sex sells! Unfortunately we sell coffee’ or ‘It’ll rain now I’ve put this board out’.

  • Man banned for life after jumping from cruise ship balcony
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    The Telegraph

    Man banned for life after jumping from cruise ship balcony

    A man has been banned from a cruise line for life after jumping from the 11th deck of the world's largest cruise ship.

  • Family's creepy discovery inside Airbnb apartment
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    Yahoo Style UK team

    Family's creepy discovery inside Airbnb apartment

    This is terrifying.

  • How to visit the real Hundred Acre Wood, home of Winnie the Pooh
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    The Telegraph

    How to visit the real Hundred Acre Wood, home of Winnie the Pooh

    A.A. Milne observed the adventures his son, Christopher Robin, had with his toys in the woods by their home in Ashdown Forest, East Sussex, gaining inspiration for the beloved Winnie the Pooh books. To mark the renowned author's birthday (also known as Winnie the Pooh Day), we explore this corner of south-east England.

  • Vientiane cruise port guide
    Style
    The Telegraph

    Vientiane cruise port guide

    Low-slung Vientiane hugs the middle Mekong and is the growing capital of landlocked Laos. Originally known as the City of Sandalwood, it’s a quirky mix of beautiful Buddhist temples, Communist monuments, smart French colonial villas (plus a raft of neglected ones), cosmopolitan cafés, and an excellent foodie scene. It’s an essential visit for cruise passengers looking to understand this Southeast Asian nation.

  • Book It: Four of the best Caribbean beach hotels for sun, sea and serious relaxation
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    The Telegraph

    Book It: Four of the best Caribbean beach hotels for sun, sea and serious relaxation

    It’s time to flee the winter chill and get roasting on a beautiful Caribbean escape. Pick an island and set your dial to chillout mode.

  • The art of naming airports
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    The Independent

    The art of naming airports

    You may not know Louisville, Kentucky. Two years after his death, the heavyweight boxer and humanitarian is to be celebrated through the name of the local Louisville Muhammad Ali International airport. Almost every US airport seems to be named after someone, though usually a local worthy like the 1930s New York police chief Fiorello La Guardia rather than a global statesman like John F Kennedy.

  • The remote Australian island with a fascinating history – but an uncertain future
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    The Telegraph

    The remote Australian island with a fascinating history – but an uncertain future

    The hand-written sign leaning against the old stone wall that protects Norfolk Island’s historic former Legislative Assembly building declares: “Norfolk Island under siege!!!”

  • Man jumps from 11th floor of world's largest cruise ship in Instagram stunt
    Style
    The Independent

    Man jumps from 11th floor of world's largest cruise ship in Instagram stunt

    A passenger jumped from the 11th floor of the world’s largest cruise ship in an attempt to go viral on Instagram. American Nick Naydev, 27, jumped 30 metres from the 1,120-foot-long Royal Caribbean ship while friends filmed the stunt. The Symphony of the Seas ship was docked in Nassau, Bahamas, at the time.

  • The forgotten Swede who made the Grand Canyon famous
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    The Telegraph

    The forgotten Swede who made the Grand Canyon famous

    In mid-afternoon at the South Rim, it was hard to believe that Americans once had to be encouraged to visit the Grand Canyon. Daytrippers, fresh off the train after a two-hour journey from Williams, pouted at the end of selfie sticks; hikers sweated the last yards up the Bright Angel Trail; diners in the El Tovar Hotel gazed through the windows over the crumbs of their club sandwiches; and browsers in the gift shop dithered over the Grand Canyon thirstystone coasters, the Grand Canyon prickly pear taffy, and the beige cotton Grand Canyon National Park bandana, complete with topographic map of the Colorado River, that carver of the chasm.

  • Avalanche reports: what is the risk in the French Alps this week?
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    The Telegraph

    Avalanche reports: what is the risk in the French Alps this week?

    Staying safe when skiing or snowboarding in the mountains is crucial – an important part of that is being aware of the risk of avalanche where you are, being prepared when heading off piste, and knowing what to do should an avalanche happen.

  • Where to celebrate the genius of Leonardo da Vinci, 500 years on
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    The Telegraph

    Where to celebrate the genius of Leonardo da Vinci, 500 years on

    Five hundred years ago, on May 2 1519 in Amboise, in the Loire Valley, Leonardo da Vinci died. There is a romantic legend that he breathed his last in the arms of his 24-year-old patron, François I. In fact, the French king was at least a day’s ride away at the time. Leonardo probably died in the bedroom of his grace and favour château Clos Lucé, before burial in the Chapel of Saint-Hubert in the grounds of the royal Château d’Amboise.

  • 48 hours in . . . Los Angeles, an insider guide to the City of Angels
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    The Telegraph

    48 hours in . . . Los Angeles, an insider guide to the City of Angels

    Los Angeles has long been looked down on by its East Coast counterparts, but now that the rest of world has caught up with California’s green juice and wellness obsession, the city is having something of a moment. No longer deemed a cultural wasteland, LA is bursting with new art galleries and museums, a flourishing fashion scene and some of the most talked about restaurants in America.

  • Royal retreats: 9 incredible palace hotels in India
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    The Telegraph

    Royal retreats: 9 incredible palace hotels in India

    An insider's guide into the top palace hotels in India, including the best for royal residences, opulent interiors, romantic settings, extravagant architecture, extensive lawned gardens and refined Indian cuisine, in locations including Rajasthan, Mumbai, Kolkata, Jaipur and Udaipur.

  • Ryanair profits warning due to ‘lower than expected’ winter fares
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    The Independent

    Ryanair profits warning due to ‘lower than expected’ winter fares

    Europe’s biggest budget airline has warned investors that its profits will be around €100m (£88m) lower than expected for the financial year that ends in March 2019. Ryanair operates a “price passive/load factor active” strategy, which means it will cut fares to whatever level is necessary to fill its planes – currently at a load factor of around 95 per cent. It has been selling seats from the UK for as little as £9.99, which means it takes an instant loss as it is required to pay £13 in air passenger duty.

  • Skellig Michael must drastically cull tourist numbers to meet Unesco recommendation
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    The Independent

    Skellig Michael must drastically cull tourist numbers to meet Unesco recommendation

    Skellig Michael would need to cut visitor numbers by a third to meet Unesco recommendations, according to new figures. The monastic island 12km off the west coast of the Republic of Ireland attracted 16,792 tourists in 2018 – 5,692 more than the 11,000 advised by the world heritage organisation. Unesco has listed Skellig Michael as a World Heritage Site since 1996, but the heritage arm of the United Nations has strict stipulations if destinations want to hang onto their status.

  • Man has to be restrained by fellow passengers on flight to Russia
    Style
    The Independent

    Man has to be restrained by fellow passengers on flight to Russia

    A passenger flying from Russia from Bangkok had to be restrained with tape and belts when he refused to stop drinking. The man, flying on S7 flight 582 to the Russian city of Novosibirsk, had to be restrained by fellow passengers when the cabin crew were unable to subdue the 26-year-old. Later in the flight, a cabin crew member noticed him drinking alcohol and asked him to stop, the airline said.