• Sleeping with the light or TV on linked to weight gain in women
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Sleeping with the light or TV on linked to weight gain in women

    Time to invest in an eye mask.

  • You can train yourself to become a morning person in just three weeks, say science
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    You can train yourself to become a morning person in just three weeks, say science

    Researchers found making simple tweaks to your lifestyle can help you perform well in the mornings.

  • Children at risk of obesity due to sleep deprivation
    Style
    The Independent

    Children at risk of obesity due to sleep deprivation

    Thousands of children aren’t getting enough sleep and are consequently putting themselves at a greater risk of obesity, a poll suggests.A survey conducted by the British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) of more than 6,000 children found that 32 per cent of primary school pupils and 70 per cent of secondary school students get less than nine hours of sleep a night, the minimum recommended amount.Half of those in secondary school also reported waking up in the middle of the night at least once.The survey also looked at the eating habits of the children and found that a quarter of secondary school students and one in ten primary school pupils had not eaten breakfast that day.Meanwhile, it seems that many others could be missing out on key nutrients, with only 18 per cent of secondary school students consuming fruit or vegetables in their first meal of the day.Nearly two in three (59 per cent) of this group said they used a screen before bedtime, with 49 per cent of primary school group saying the same, leading scientists to believe that this might be to blame for their poor sleep.The poll also examined the sleeping patterns of more than 1,500 adults and found that 43 per cent of them get fewer than seven hours of kip a night while 80 per cent reported waking up at least once in the night. Half of those surveyed also said they used some kind of screen-based device before going to sleep.Dr Lucy Chambers, senior scientist at the BNF, said a bad night’s sleep can lead both adults and children to make unhealthy decisions when it comes to their food.“Where lack of, and disturbed, sleep can lead to both adults and young people feeling grumpy and irritable, regular poor-quality sleep can have a negative impact on dietary choices, including higher intakes of calories and more frequent snacking on less healthy foods,” she explained.“The BNF’s Task Force report, published earlier this year, highlighted that lack of sleep, and interrupted sleep, may be linked to an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension.”The findings reflect those of a previous report published in Science Advances, which found that a night of missed sleep could leave you feeling physically weaker and more at risk of obesity.

  • It's Not Just Kids Who Need Naps In The Day – Us Parents Do, Too
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    HuffPost UK

    It's Not Just Kids Who Need Naps In The Day – Us Parents Do, Too

    Children are happier, have fewer behavioural problems and excel academicallywhen they take a nap in the afternoon, a new study suggests

  • Professor claims 'controlled crying' helps babies sleep better
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Professor claims 'controlled crying' helps babies sleep better

    Should parents leave their babies to 'cry it out'?

  • Is listening to our internal body clock the key to getting a better night's sleep?
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Is listening to our internal body clock the key to getting a better night's sleep?

    Have we been sleeping wrong this entire time?

  • Concerned parents issue warning to Kim Kardashian over SIDS risk
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Concerned parents issue warning to Kim Kardashian over SIDS risk

    “Be careful with all the blankets so much with SIDS nowadays."

  • 'Under seven hours sleep a night could trigger a stroke or heart attack'
    Style
    Danielle Fowler

    'Under seven hours sleep a night could trigger a stroke or heart attack'

    It might be time to bid farewell to those late night Netflix sessions.

  • Snoring or waking up exhausted 'could be linked to an increased cancer risk' in women
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Snoring or waking up exhausted 'could be linked to an increased cancer risk' in women

    Women who who suffer from a sleep disorder known as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer.

  • Could hitting the snooze button be bad for your health?
    Style
    The Independent

    Could hitting the snooze button be bad for your health?

    How often every morning do you hit the snooze button on your phone alarm? Once, twice, three times a morning? Timely news for Mental Health Awareness Week in the UK, a recent report by eve sleep shows that 82% of Brits are in the habit of snoozing at least once*. Have you ever considered what this ritual – the repeated "shocking" of your brain into consciousness – might be doing to it? What the effects on your overall mental health might be?  Sleep-wellness brand eve sleep certainly have – they commissioned 'Refuse to Snooze', a report authored by mental health and neuroscience expert Matt Janes, and Michael Banissy, co-director of the Sleep Lab at Goldsmiths Psychology department. What their research uncovered was nothing short of, well, alarming. “It is clear from the report that the snooze button is having a negative impact on the mornings of over 80 per cent of Brits," says James Sturrock, CEO of eve sleep. “That’s why we’re taking on the snooze button with our Refuse To Snooze campaign, as we believe that everyone deserves the perfect start to their morning,” he adds. Tackling stress levels “Modern lifestyles have created unprecedented levels of stress,” says report co-author Matt Janes. “Our brain and body cannot cope with the assault and they’re breaking. If we examine what’s happening to [our] physiology during this assault, we uncover an answer to the UK’s mental health crisis.” Neuroscience and mental health expert Matt Janes As the report explains, our autonomic nervous system controls all physiological and biochemical processes in our bodies – from respiration to cardiovascular functions and digestion. This system consists of two branches: the sympathetic and parasympathetic, which work in tandem with one another. “We all fall into one of three autonomic types,” Janes explains, “sympathetic dominant, parasympathetic dominant or balanced metaboliser. The first of these three groups, the sympathetic dominants, are most at risk from anxiety and agitated depression, and get pushed further out of balance with increased stress load. For this group, pressing the snooze button invites more stress to an already overloaded system.” The negative effects of snoozing can also be felt by parasympathetic dominants, who naturally have weak sympathetic systems and are prone to melancholic depression when subjected to repeated stressors, such as a snooze alarm. How to sleep better eve sleep argue we need to banish our snoozing habit. To do this, we must negate our desire to do it in the first place, and this means ensuring we get a good night’s sleep every night. To set this up, an excellent sleeping environment is paramount and key to this is obviously, a comfortable bed. Are we sleeping on the right mattress, we need to ask ourselves? Might we need to upgrade to a memory foam or a hybrid, a natural or a spring option? And what about our pillows? Could we benefit from foam models or those with microfibre support? Combine a good sleeping environment with excellent nutrition throughout the day and exercise, plus getting to bed at a reasonable hour, and we should be on the road to achieving a good night’s sleep that leaves us feeling refreshed and raring to go come morning time, with no need whatsoever to snooze. Think you might need a touch more help? Why not replace your snooze with something else, like a nine-minute episode of the Refuse to Snooze podcast with Andi Peters? In a five-part series, each episode explores engaging topics from relationships to parenting, and features discussions with guests such as model and philanthropist Katie Piper. Listen first thing (instead of pressing that snooze button) to start your day the healthy way. For more information on eve sleep’s Refuse to Snooze campaign, and how you can create your dream sleeping environment, visit evesleep.co.uk/refusetosnooze *eve sleep commissioned research by OnePoll. Sample size - 2000 correspondents

  • Still feel tired after eight hours? Here's how to up the quality of your sleep
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Still feel tired after eight hours? Here's how to up the quality of your sleep

    Expert advice from a slumber scientist

  • Could hitting the snooze button be bad for your health?
    Style
    The Independent

    Could hitting the snooze button be bad for your health?

    How often every morning do you hit the snooze button on your phone alarm? Once, twice, three times a morning? Timely news for Mental Health Awareness Week in the UK, a recent report by eve sleep shows that 82% of Brits are in the habit of snoozing at least once*. Have you ever considered what this ritual – the repeated "shocking" of your brain into consciousness – might be doing to it? What the effects on your overall mental health might be? Sleep-wellness brand eve sleep certainly have – they commissioned 'Refuse to Snooze', a report authored by mental health and neuroscience expert Matt Janes, and Michael Banissy, co-director of the Sleep Lab at Goldsmiths Psychology department. What their research uncovered was nothing short of, well, alarming. “It is clear from the report that the snooze button is having a negative impact on the mornings of over 80 per cent of Brits," says James Sturrock, CEO of eve sleep. “That’s why we’re taking on the snooze button with our Refuse To Snooze campaign, as we believe that everyone deserves the perfect start to their morning,” he adds. Tackling stress levels“Modern lifestyles have created unprecedented levels of stress,” says report co-author Matt Janes. “Our brain and body cannot cope with the assault and they’re breaking. If we examine what’s happening to [our] physiology during this assault, we uncover an answer to the UK’s mental health crisis.”As the report explains, our autonomic nervous system controls all physiological and biochemical processes in our bodies – from respiration to cardiovascular functions and digestion. This system consists of two branches: the sympathetic and parasympathetic, which work in tandem with one another.“We all fall into one of three autonomic types,” Janes explains, “sympathetic dominant, parasympathetic dominant or balanced metaboliser. The first of these three groups, the sympathetic dominants, are most at risk from anxiety and agitated depression, and get pushed further out of balance with increased stress load. For this group, pressing the snooze button invites more stress to an already overloaded system.”The negative effects of snoozing can also be felt by parasympathetic dominants, who naturally have weak sympathetic systems and are prone to melancholic depression when subjected to repeated stressors, such as a snooze alarm. How to sleep bettereve sleep argue we need to banish our snoozing habit. To do this, we must negate our desire to do it in the first place, and this means ensuring we get a good night’s sleep every night. To set this up, an excellent sleeping environment is paramount and key to this is obviously, a comfortable bed. Are we sleeping on the right mattress, we need to ask ourselves? Might we need to upgrade to a memory foam or a hybrid, a natural or a spring option? And what about our pillows? Could we benefit from foam models or those with microfibre support?Combine a good sleeping environment with excellent nutrition throughout the day and exercise, plus getting to bed at a reasonable hour, and we should be on the road to achieving a good night’s sleep that leaves us feeling refreshed and raring to go come morning time, with no need whatsoever to snooze.Think you might need a touch more help? Why not replace your snooze with something else, like a nine-minute episode of the Refuse to Snooze podcast with Andi Peters? In a five-part series, each episode explores engaging topics from relationships to parenting, and features discussions with guests such as model and philanthropist Katie Piper. Listen first thing (instead of pressing that snooze button) to start your day the healthy way.For more information on eve sleep’s Refuse to Snooze campaign, and how you can create your dream sleeping environment, visit evesleep.co.uk/refusetosnooze*eve sleep commissioned research by OnePoll. Sample size - 2000 correspondents

  • Sophrology for sleep: just 5 sessions of this technique could help you get more shut-eye
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Sophrology for sleep: just 5 sessions of this technique could help you get more shut-eye

    Sleep deprivation causes a long list of problems. The University of East Anglia even recently opened a dedicated research unit to investigate the link between poor sleep and dementia. From sensor-fitted headsets and mindfulness apps, to more word-of-mouths tricks – someone once told me that their mum swears by cherry juice.

  • Losing just 16 minutes sleep can ruin your work day
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Losing just 16 minutes sleep can ruin your work day

    It has a much greater effect than you think.

  • Could sleeping apart from your partner lead to more sex?
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Could sleeping apart from your partner lead to more sex?

    British couples who sleep apart have more sex, according to a new nationwide survey.

  • Common sleep myths keeping you awake - and damaging your health
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Common sleep myths keeping you awake - and damaging your health

    Scientists have broken down the most common misconceptions surrounding shut-eye.

  • How often should you flip your mattress?
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    How often should you flip your mattress?

    Everything you need to know.

  • Why snoozing your alarm could be damaging your health
    Style
    Cosmo

    Why snoozing your alarm could be damaging your health

    Is it time to start practising getting out of bed immediately?

  • How to help your children sleep when the clocks go forward
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    How to help your children sleep when the clocks go forward

    What does the clocks going forward mean for parents' sleep?

  • Couple who regularly swap sides of the bed spark debate about sleep habits
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Couple who regularly swap sides of the bed spark debate about sleep habits

    "I'm not sure you are actually human."

  • How to get back to sleep if you always wake up in the middle of the night
    Style
    Cosmo

    How to get back to sleep if you always wake up in the middle of the night

    One thing you probably automatically do is stopping you from getting back to sleep..