• Elizabeth Hurley, 54, reveals go-to suncream as she sunbathes in striped bikini
    Style
    Jessica Morgan

    Elizabeth Hurley, 54, reveals go-to suncream as she sunbathes in striped bikini

    At 54, the British bombshell knows how to keep her skin protected

  • Vitiligo: what is it, why does it happen and what’s the treatment?
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Vitiligo: what is it, why does it happen and what’s the treatment?

    A dermatologist reveals all

  • Best beauty advent calendars 2019: Jo Malone, Lush, Charlotte Tilbury and The Body Shop
    Style
    Jessica Morgan

    Best beauty advent calendars 2019: Jo Malone, Lush, Charlotte Tilbury and The Body Shop

    Chocolate advent calendars are so last year. This year, treat yourself to one of these seriously luxe beauty advent calendars.

  • This concealer is the secret to Meghan Markle's flawless 'five minute face'
    Style
    Jessica Morgan

    This concealer is the secret to Meghan Markle's flawless 'five minute face'

    The cult-favourite is a must-have for the Duchess

  • The 8 Serums You Need If You're in Your 30s
    Style
    Women's Health UK

    The 8 Serums You Need If You're in Your 30s

    Did someone say 'active ingredient?'

  • The One Skincare Product an Expert Would Say Is Missing From Your Beauty Routine
    Style
    Who What Wear

    The One Skincare Product an Expert Would Say Is Missing From Your Beauty Routine

    It's not always about the serum selection.

  • These Cheap Moisturisers Are Just as Good as Their Expensive Counterparts
    Style
    Who What Wear

    These Cheap Moisturisers Are Just as Good as Their Expensive Counterparts

    Affordable skincare at its very best.

  • The £15 moisturiser Heidi Klum has been using for years
    Style
    Evening Standard

    The £15 moisturiser Heidi Klum has been using for years

    Everyone loves a solid, purse-friendly beauty recommendation – especially when it comes from a supermodel. In a recent interview, Heidi Klum shared her surprisingly affordable wellness routine involving apricot facial scrubs and regular loofah-ing. And, to our joy, she also namechecked a product from affordable, yet celebrity-adored, skincare brand Mario Badescu.> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by Heidi Klum (@heidiklum) on Jun 15, 2019 at 2:23pm PDTDetailing her, naturally, very healthy lifestyle routine, Klum told Today: "I eat very healthy and I run on the treadmill a little bit. There is no secret shake or secret pill. I wish there was. I just love eating good and healthy food. I don’t go to dinner a lot," she told the publication. "We cook every day. I have four children. It’s about cooking fresh food every day and not caring it too much. Eating home-cooked at meals at a specific time. I eat at six and that’s kind of it."And when it comes to her trusty skincare favourites, you might expect the supermodel to rely solely on eye-wateringly expensive premium brands but, in fact, the model says she uses Mario Badescu Buttermilk Moisturiser (£15.50) for its lightweight consistency. "I use it on my face. It’s very light," she said. "When I use very rich creams, I break out in pimples. I’ve been using it for years. It doesn’t clog my pores.”The product contains lactic acid, an alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA), which is derived from milk and softens and moisturisers the top layer of the skin, while also giving a mild exfoliating effect. It works in a similar way to glycolic acid but is less potent, making it a good option for people with sensitive skin.The Mario Badescu buttermilk moisturiser also contains non-pore clogging carnation oil and allantoin, which is known for its healing and anti-inflammatory benefits. > View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by Mario Badescu Skin Care (@mariobadescu) on Sep 14, 2016 at 10:16am PDTThe iconic beauty brand, which was founded by Mario Badescu in New York back in 1967, has built a cult celebrity following, including the likes of Kylie Jenner who reportedly swears by the facial mist. Meanwhile, the brand's Drying Lotion (£16) has been lauded by acne-sufferers for its supposed spot zapping powers. Not only do Mario Badescu products contain clever ingredient combinations that pack a punch in the skincare department, but they they all come in retro hues of pink, turquoise and mint greens which will look perfect in your next shelfie. Win, win.

  • Cheap flights blamed as skin cancer rates soar by 45 per cent in a decade
    Style
    The Independent

    Cheap flights blamed as skin cancer rates soar by 45 per cent in a decade

    Rates of melanoma skin cancers have soared by 45 per cent in the past decade as cheap international flights have fuelled a new generation of sun chasers, charities have warned.Melanomas are rarer but more serious than non-melanoma skin cancers and rates have risen most steeply among men and the under-50s, a Cancer Research UK analysis found.In a warning to holidaymakers, who are now able to jet off to warmer climes several times a year, the charity said skin damage in your earlier years can permanently increase your cancer risk.Melanoma begins in pigment-producing melanocyte cells and is the UK’s fifth most common cancer, with 16,000 people diagnosed annually.However, it is the second most common in people aged 25 to 49 and experts warn as many as 90 per cent of cases could be prevented with simple sun protection.Cancer Research UK has launched a campaign to encourage people to embrace their natural skin tone and warn of the perils of chasing the perfect tan.“While some might think that a tan is a sign of good health, there is no such thing as a healthy tan,” Michelle Mitchell, chief executive of the charity, said. “It’s actually your body trying to protect itself from harmful rays.“These statistics highlight the importance of our Own Your Tone campaign, which encourages people to embrace their natural skin tone and adopt sun-safe behaviours.”Between 2004/06 and 2014/16, the most recent data available, melanoma rates have risen by 55 per cent in men and 35 per cent in women. Across all cases, the rise was from 18 cases per 100,000 people in the population to 26 per 100,000.While melanoma is still more common in those aged over 65, rates for 25- to 49-year-olds have increased by 70 per cent since the 1990s.The jump has been from nine cases per 100,000 people in 1993/1995 to 16 per 100,000 in 2014/2016.According to Cancer Research UK, the rise of package holidays in the 1970s and a more recent surge in cheap flights has seen more people going abroad, sometimes several times a year, putting their skin at risk from strong sun.Improved awareness of the disease, has also been a factor with more people seeking a diagnosis for suspect moles and blemishes.Getting sunburnt just once every two years triples the risk of melanoma.Karis Betts, health information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “Sun safety is not just for when you’re going abroad, the sun can be strong enough to burn in the UK from the start of April to the end of September.“We want to encourage people to embrace their natural look and protect their skin from UV damage by seeking shade, covering up and regularly applying sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and four or five stars.”Susannah Brown, head of research interpretation at the World Cancer Research Fund, said: “These figures are shocking, but a positive message to take out of this research is that skin cancer is preventable.“Our own research has shown that unlike many other cancers, diet and exercise patterns do not appear to be strongly associated with your risk of skin cancer and that it is the sun that continues to be the main cause.”

  • Why nobody has facelifts anymore
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Why nobody has facelifts anymore

    Three magic treatments that are needle and knife-free

  • What is butne and how can it be treated?
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    What is butne and how can it be treated?

    Having a spotty botty is actually pretty common.

  • 7 Spa-Worthy DIY Face Mask Recipes You Can Make At Home
    Style
    Elle

    7 Spa-Worthy DIY Face Mask Recipes You Can Make At Home

    Super-easy to throw together and good enough to eat

  • This high street moisturiser is sold every 18 seconds
    Style
    Red

    This high street moisturiser is sold every 18 seconds

    And it costs a reasonable £13

  • How to get the most natural-looking spray tan
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    How to get the most natural-looking spray tan

    And make it last longer

  • Kylie Jenner blasted by fans over skincare brand as she uses a product to wash her face and has 'make-up stained towel'
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Kylie Jenner blasted by fans over skincare brand as she uses a product to wash her face and has 'make-up stained towel'

    Kylie Jenner has been criticised by fans after washing her face in a product demonstration video - only to reveal a make-up stained towel. In her latest video, Jenner – using a Snapchat filter – cleanses her face with one of the brand’s products in a whirlwind demonstration, far less than the suggested 1-2 minute washing time. Fans were quick to pull Jenner up on the video, slamming her for “not knowing how to wash her own face” and highlighting the “foundation”.

  • The One Product Skincare Experts Wish You'd Stop Using
    Style
    Who What Wear

    The One Product Skincare Experts Wish You'd Stop Using

    It's causing more harm than good.

  • Microneedling: What happened when I tried this scary sounding skin treatment
    Style
    The Independent

    Microneedling: What happened when I tried this scary sounding skin treatment

    My skincare regime is slapdash at the best of times (more slap than dash if truth be told): a bit of baby oil to take off my eye make-up and a slick of Nivea for the rest. I’m also fond of slathering on some night cream and hoping for an overnight miracle, as promised on the jar.So, I’m not good with facials. The last time I had one I had to suppress a case of the giggles. While monks chanted through a Bluetooth speaker, a face mask tightened on my skin and a beautician spoke to me in absurdly soft tones that I strained to hear, I struggled to relax. So when an email popped into my inbox about the latest facial trend of microneedling, I almost deleted it.But then I remembered that a friend of mine had the procedure done some time ago and her skin looked great, so I decided to go along and give it a go. What was the worst that could happen?Microneedling (collagen induction therapy) is a minimally invasive treatment that involves making tiny punctures in the skin with a series of fine needles. Apparently a “brilliant collagen stimulator” – the “micro-injuries” caused by the needles stimulate the body’s healing processes, producing lots of lovely collagen, not only during the process, but for some time after too. And it isn’t limited to the face, apparently able to help with stretch marks, scar tissue and the after-effects of acne. It’s billed as “safe and effective” on a range of skin types, including sensitive skin.With a birthday coming up, I read on. The treatment, they said, would be “comfortable” – the needles in a microneedling device are thinner than a strand of hair. If they were coming anywhere near me I certainly hoped so. A mention of numbing cream was reassuring.The next morning I booked my appointment at Regents Park Aesthetics, being careful to avoid Googling microneedling images.When I arrived at the clinic a week later I was met by Natasha, who was going to do the honours. She immediately put me at my ease, explaining each step of the procedure with calming clarity. And her own youthful, dewy complexion couldn’t help but inspire confidence.First, Natasha applied a topical local anaesthetic cream to my face, and I had to wait for about five minutes for it to take effect. It was all reassuringly clinical: next, she unwrapped the sterile microneedling pen, or “Collagen P.I.N.” (Percutaneous Induction Needling), as it’s apparently called.And so the treatment began. I’m pleased to report that it was completely underwhelming: I had imagined blood, tears and probably a bit of wailing, but it was fine. At best it was quite relaxing, at worst a bit like pins and needles on your face, which was a bit weird, but nothing more. The sensation round and over my nose was strange, but none of the procedure was in any way painful.All the while Natasha explained what she was doing, asking if I was OK or if I wanted her to stop, so I felt in control of the whole experience. She worked on my face for about an hour all in all, concentrating on "problem areas" (my whole face, I think) and as she microneedled away she applied the growth factor serum, which promotes collagen production.When it was all done, I looked in the mirror – and looking back at me was a red-faced person. Not bloodied and bruised, not 10 rounds with Anthony Joshua, as I’d feared, just red-faced. Natasha gave me some collagen cream for the next few days and gave me clear instructions about what I should and shouldn’t do over the coming days and weeks (“You haven’t got anything planned tonight, have you?”).The regime wasn’t too difficult to accommodate: no make-up for at least 48 hours; no face creams or serums containing retinol or highly concentrated acid-based products; use gentle skincare products with no active ingredients; and apply sunscreen with an SPF of 30+ when going out for at least the next two weeks.Natasha also told me what I could expect in terms of the aftermath of the treatment, how long the redness would last. My skin would start to flake, she warned. Going home was slightly comical: deciding to get the tube, I wrapped my scarf around my face and didn’t make eye contact with anyone. That evening, my partner said I looked like Sir Alex Ferguson – which I could only take as a compliment, knowing how highly he regards himI had thought that as the anaesthetic cream wore off, it might be painful but it wasn’t at all. The following day my skin was very red, but not sore - apart from when I applied the cream - which admittedly did sting. The worst part was when my skin started flaking, as Natasha had warned. It began about day three and really was unpleasant. My skin was patchy, dry and incredibly itchy. But it only really lasted for a day – I would say give yourself a weekend to get over it.Now three weeks on from the procedure, I would say my skin is looking better – not especially youthful, but somehow healthier. And there may be a slight improvement in my lines, but they were far from fine lines, so any improvement is good. Results vary from person to person, but most people report to seeing a positive change one to two weeks after the first treatment. One single full-face session at Regents Park Aesthetics costs £200 and a course of three costs £550. My experience was that one session wasn't enough, so for the full benefits the complete course of three is probably what you'd need, of course that will set you back a pretty penny, so perhaps starting with an acid peel could be the way to go.

  • How to Get Rid of Acne Scars Once and For All
    Style
    Women's Health UK

    How to Get Rid of Acne Scars Once and For All

    The products and treatments to know