• 7 Spa-Worthy DIY Face Mask Recipes You Can Make At Home
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    Elle

    7 Spa-Worthy DIY Face Mask Recipes You Can Make At Home

    Super-easy to throw together and good enough to eat

  • This high street moisturiser is sold every 18 seconds
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    Red

    This high street moisturiser is sold every 18 seconds

    And it costs a reasonable £13

  • How to get the most natural-looking spray tan
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    Harper’s Bazaar

    How to get the most natural-looking spray tan

    And make it last longer

  • Kylie Jenner blasted by fans over skincare brand as she uses a product to wash her face and has 'make-up stained towel'
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Kylie Jenner blasted by fans over skincare brand as she uses a product to wash her face and has 'make-up stained towel'

    Kylie Jenner has been criticised by fans after washing her face in a product demonstration video - only to reveal a make-up stained towel. In her latest video, Jenner – using a Snapchat filter – cleanses her face with one of the brand’s products in a whirlwind demonstration, far less than the suggested 1-2 minute washing time. Fans were quick to pull Jenner up on the video, slamming her for “not knowing how to wash her own face” and highlighting the “foundation”.

  • The One Product Skincare Experts Wish You'd Stop Using
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    Who What Wear

    The One Product Skincare Experts Wish You'd Stop Using

    It's causing more harm than good.

  • Microneedling: What happened when I tried this scary sounding skin treatment
    Style
    The Independent

    Microneedling: What happened when I tried this scary sounding skin treatment

    My skincare regime is slapdash at the best of times (more slap than dash if truth be told): a bit of baby oil to take off my eye make-up and a slick of Nivea for the rest. I’m also fond of slathering on some night cream and hoping for an overnight miracle, as promised on the jar.So, I’m not good with facials. The last time I had one I had to suppress a case of the giggles. While monks chanted through a Bluetooth speaker, a face mask tightened on my skin and a beautician spoke to me in absurdly soft tones that I strained to hear, I struggled to relax. So when an email popped into my inbox about the latest facial trend of microneedling, I almost deleted it.But then I remembered that a friend of mine had the procedure done some time ago and her skin looked great, so I decided to go along and give it a go. What was the worst that could happen?Microneedling (collagen induction therapy) is a minimally invasive treatment that involves making tiny punctures in the skin with a series of fine needles. Apparently a “brilliant collagen stimulator” – the “micro-injuries” caused by the needles stimulate the body’s healing processes, producing lots of lovely collagen, not only during the process, but for some time after too. And it isn’t limited to the face, apparently able to help with stretch marks, scar tissue and the after-effects of acne. It’s billed as “safe and effective” on a range of skin types, including sensitive skin.With a birthday coming up, I read on. The treatment, they said, would be “comfortable” – the needles in a microneedling device are thinner than a strand of hair. If they were coming anywhere near me I certainly hoped so. A mention of numbing cream was reassuring.The next morning I booked my appointment at Regents Park Aesthetics, being careful to avoid Googling microneedling images.When I arrived at the clinic a week later I was met by Natasha, who was going to do the honours. She immediately put me at my ease, explaining each step of the procedure with calming clarity. And her own youthful, dewy complexion couldn’t help but inspire confidence.First, Natasha applied a topical local anaesthetic cream to my face, and I had to wait for about five minutes for it to take effect. It was all reassuringly clinical: next, she unwrapped the sterile microneedling pen, or “Collagen P.I.N.” (Percutaneous Induction Needling), as it’s apparently called.And so the treatment began. I’m pleased to report that it was completely underwhelming: I had imagined blood, tears and probably a bit of wailing, but it was fine. At best it was quite relaxing, at worst a bit like pins and needles on your face, which was a bit weird, but nothing more. The sensation round and over my nose was strange, but none of the procedure was in any way painful.All the while Natasha explained what she was doing, asking if I was OK or if I wanted her to stop, so I felt in control of the whole experience. She worked on my face for about an hour all in all, concentrating on "problem areas" (my whole face, I think) and as she microneedled away she applied the growth factor serum, which promotes collagen production.When it was all done, I looked in the mirror – and looking back at me was a red-faced person. Not bloodied and bruised, not 10 rounds with Anthony Joshua, as I’d feared, just red-faced. Natasha gave me some collagen cream for the next few days and gave me clear instructions about what I should and shouldn’t do over the coming days and weeks (“You haven’t got anything planned tonight, have you?”).The regime wasn’t too difficult to accommodate: no make-up for at least 48 hours; no face creams or serums containing retinol or highly concentrated acid-based products; use gentle skincare products with no active ingredients; and apply sunscreen with an SPF of 30+ when going out for at least the next two weeks.Natasha also told me what I could expect in terms of the aftermath of the treatment, how long the redness would last. My skin would start to flake, she warned. Going home was slightly comical: deciding to get the tube, I wrapped my scarf around my face and didn’t make eye contact with anyone. That evening, my partner said I looked like Sir Alex Ferguson – which I could only take as a compliment, knowing how highly he regards himI had thought that as the anaesthetic cream wore off, it might be painful but it wasn’t at all. The following day my skin was very red, but not sore - apart from when I applied the cream - which admittedly did sting. The worst part was when my skin started flaking, as Natasha had warned. It began about day three and really was unpleasant. My skin was patchy, dry and incredibly itchy. But it only really lasted for a day – I would say give yourself a weekend to get over it.Now three weeks on from the procedure, I would say my skin is looking better – not especially youthful, but somehow healthier. And there may be a slight improvement in my lines, but they were far from fine lines, so any improvement is good. Results vary from person to person, but most people report to seeing a positive change one to two weeks after the first treatment. One single full-face session at Regents Park Aesthetics costs £200 and a course of three costs £550. My experience was that one session wasn't enough, so for the full benefits the complete course of three is probably what you'd need, of course that will set you back a pretty penny, so perhaps starting with an acid peel could be the way to go.

  • How to Get Rid of Acne Scars Once and For All
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    Women's Health UK

    How to Get Rid of Acne Scars Once and For All

    The products and treatments to know

  • What is pollution doing to our skin and which products will protect us?
    Style
    Lauren Clark

    What is pollution doing to our skin and which products will protect us?

    Indeed, online searches for anti-pollution skincare, that protects against urban environmental damage, are up by 73 per cent. Liberty, the London-based luxury department store, has also seen a spike of 166 per cent in people purchasing from its anti-pollution skincare range. Dr Ross Perry, medical director of CosmedicsUK, has revealed that experts have been concerned for a while about the effect of pollution on our skin.

  • What is a skincare fridge and why is everyone obsessed with them?
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    Caroline Allen

    What is a skincare fridge and why is everyone obsessed with them?

    These adorable mini fridges have been popping up all over beauty bloggers' Instagram accounts using the hashtag #minifridgeshelfie and we are here for it.

  • What is vitiligo? The rare skin condition explained
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    The Independent

    What is vitiligo? The rare skin condition explained

    A condition that causes the skin to lose pigmentation, vitiligo affects around one per cent of the UK population. The long-term disorder, in which white patches of skin appear on different parts of the body, is caused by a lack of pigment called melanin and is thought to be an autoimmune condition. In recent years, vitiligo has become more widely recognised thanks to celebrities like supermodel Winnie Harlow discussing and breaking barriers associated with the condition.

  • Are cold showers really that good for you?
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    Caroline Allen

    Are cold showers really that good for you?

    Cold showers could be the key to glowing skin, glossy hair, boosted energy and even an improved immune system.

  • Are the ingredients in bath bombs really good for you?
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    Caroline Allen

    Are the ingredients in bath bombs really good for you?

    It's been 30 years since this iconic bath-time saviour exploded onto the scene, but have we ever stopped to consider what's actually in them?

  • What is glycolic acid and why should I be using it?
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    The Telegraph

    What is glycolic acid and why should I be using it?

    Acid. It may not be the obvious choice when it comes to skincare, but in actual fact, a little light acid action - we're talking very low quantities here (think of it like diluted lemon juice) - could be exactly what your complexions need. Especially in the run up to the clocks springing forward, when our skin may need a bit of extra help at the end of winter to sweep away the dullness.

  • Meghan Markle's favourite mascara is just £8.99
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    Red

    Meghan Markle's favourite mascara is just £8.99

    For anyone whose ever had lash envy looking at a photo of the Duchess of Sussex

  • 12 best vitamin C skincare products for brighter and clearer skin
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    The Independent

    12 best vitamin C skincare products for brighter and clearer skin

    Vitamin C is a wonder ingredient – and not just for fending off colds. Along with retinol, it is one of the few proven anti-ageing skincare ingredients (it encourages collagen production), can improve visible signs of sun damage and scarring, and helps defend skin against environmental damage caused by free radicals.It comes in lots of different forms in skincare, which can be confusing, but ascorbic acid is the one that has the most research backing its powers, so if in doubt, that's the one to look for. It's worth noting that vitamin C is a tricky ingredient – it is difficult to formulate in a way that makes it pleasant to apply to skin, and ascorbic acid breaks down with regular exposure to air and light (to prevent this, choose products that come in airtight, opaque packaging, or are even one-use) – all of which makes it an expensive ingredient, but we’d argue the results are worth it. To make the most of vitamin C's anti-pollution powers, we recommend using a vitamin C product in the morning before you head out, unless otherwise stated.You might find you experience mild irritation when you first use vitamin C; if this is the case, start using it three times a week and build up to daily use.You can trust our independent reviews. We may earn commission from some of the retailers, but we never allow this to influence selections, which are formed from real-world testing and expert advice. This revenue helps us to fund journalism across The Independent. Clinique fresh pressed 7-day system with pure vitamin C: £25, CliniqueA week-long bootcamp for dull and lined skin, Clinique's 7-day system has two steps, both containing vitamin C. Empty a packet of the “powder cleansing” into wet hands and massage into skin, leave for one minute and then remove with a flannel. Double up by adding a couple of drops of the “daily booster” to your regular moisturiser morning and evening. This is expensive considering it only lasts seven days, but it gives some of the best brightening, anti-ageing results we saw. Its limited-use nature also means there is less time for the antioxidant to break down, making it a highly effective option.Buy now LixirSkin vitamin C paste: £32, Cult BeautyLixirSkin is like a capsule wardrobe for your skincare: six super-effective products that cover all your needs with minimum fuss. Throw in the minimalist millennial pink packaging and we're sold. Its ascorbic, acid-based Vitamin C paste is a mask – warm a pea-sized amount in damp hands and massage it into your face, leave for a few minutes (we wear it while straightening our hair), then remove with a warm flannel. Skin was luminous and redness soothed after just a couple of days. Buy now The Ordinary vitamin C suspension 30% in silicone: £5.80, Cult BeautyWe're coming to rely heavily on The Ordinary for its high-results, low-prices skincare. This is our choice of its vitamin C formulas because the slightly gritty feel of ascorbic acid powder is made more pleasant to apply by its suspension in silicone. Skin was brighter and clearer after just a week's use, and our tester found it worked wonders on the acne scars along her jaw. We recommend you use this at night, as its high concentration means it may irritate slightly when you first start using it (30 per cent may be too high for sensitive skins), and because the use of silicone may cause peeling if soon followed by a silicone-based foundation. Buy now Vichy liftactiv vitamin C brightening skin corrector: £23.80, EscentualFifteen per cent ascorbic acid plus vitamin E and hydrating hyaluronic acid packs a punch in Vichy's offering. The bottle is tiny at just 10ml, but the small size minimises possibility for degradation before you use it up. Vichy recommends you apply four or five drops a day for 10 days, which is the recommended length of time for use, four times a year, but we used it for two weeks, no problem. Our tester saw visible reduction in stubborn lines on her forehead, plus redness around the nose was evened out. Buy now Murad intensive-C radiance peel: £55, Look FantasticA slightly different method of application, this combines ascorbic acid with glycolic acid – a winning pairing to smooth, brighten and protect. Apply a layer on to cleansed skin once a week and leave for 10 minutes before washing off. It’s the perfect Sunday night pamper product to put your best face forward for the week. You may experience a slight tingling while using; don't apply it to any areas of broken skin.Buy now Sunday Riley CEO glow: £68, Space NKThis is the latest addition to Sunday Riley's vitamin C range CEO, joining the brilliant rapid flash brightening serum, which is already a staple in our bathroom. The addition of turmeric root is a clever one considering its current prominence in health trends; in skincare it is an antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory. Combined with vitamin C and evening primrose oil it is rich, gives a more even skintone and reduces spot scarring.Buy now Rodial vit C energising individual sheet mask: £14, RodialPerfect for when your skin needs a quick pep-up, the thin, gel sheet mask from Rodial's vit C range combines vitamin C with vitamin B3 (for reducing the appearance of lines), soothing green tea and moisturising hyaluronic acid. Also available as a pack of four masks for £43 (just under £11 a pop).Buy now Ole Henriksen truth serum: £43, BootsThis has a delicious, if slightly medicinal, orange scent, that makes it feel good for you before you've even applied it. It has a light, silky texture so a little spreads across the face easily, and feels slightly tacky on the skin for the first couple of minutes before it sinks in. After just a few weeks of use we found skin was noticeably less red and brighter.Buy now REN glow daily vitamin C gel cream: £38, RENA moisturiser is an easy way to incorporate vitamin C into your routine as it doesn't require you to add an extra step. REN's has a gel-to-cream texture that melts into skin and is leaves skin comfortably moisturised and glowy. With regular use, we saw a good improvement in smoothness and brightness, and we found it totally safe for daily use without irritation. Buy now Drunk Elephant c-firma day serum: £67, Space NKThis, from the cult US brand that recently launched in the UK, contains a hefty 15 per cent vitamin C, so you know it will be effective. Usually, the higher the percentage the more irritating, but the blend with marula oil keeps it nourishing and the formula feels very light. Our only niggle is that we found that the serum has a slightly fake tan-like scent on the skin, presumably as it oxidises throughout the day. Buy now Balance Me vitamin C repair serum: £32, Balance MeThis, from the natural skincare brand, is particularly brilliant for more mature skins or those who are noticing the effects of sun damage. It contains “stabilised vitamin C”, which releases on the skin over time (unlike most vitamin C, which breaks down when exposed to air), boosting its efficacy targeting dark spots. We can't speak for the science, but combined with a tone-evening anti-inflammatory and hydrating hyaluronic acid, it gave a noticeably more even and radiant complexion and improved the appearance of lines on the forehead.Buy now Pixi vitamin C tonic: £10, Cult BeautyPixi's glycolic acid-based glow tonic has become a cult buy, being both a highly effective exfoliating toner and a very accessibly priced product, especially as this is a 100ml bottle. The brand has recently introduced a Vitamin C range, which includes a cleanser, serum, balm, mist and a new toner. It combines ferulic acid, which removes dead skin cells, with all the protective and brightening powers of vitamin C for clearer, more radiant skin. Soak a cotton pad and swipe over your face after cleansing.Buy now The verdict: Vitamin C skincareFor an affordable and quick-fix boost, we recommend Clinique's 7-day system for a first foray into vitamin C.

  • Best eco-friendly and biodegradable makeup remover wipes
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    Evening Standard

    Best eco-friendly and biodegradable makeup remover wipes

    When you get in from a long tiring day (or heavy night out), the last thing you want to do is a full-on skincare routine before you hit the hay – but there’ll be no excuse for not taking off your slap if you have face wipes handy. Thankfully, there are plenty of hard-working options on the market that won’t leave your skin feeling dry or sticky and even feature formulas for acne-prone, sensitive and oily skin types.

  • Kim Kardashian Posts Her "Psoriasis Face" — & How She's Treating It
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    Refinery29

    Kim Kardashian Posts Her "Psoriasis Face" — & How She's Treating It

    Update: Kim Kardashian West has proven time and time again that she isn't afraid to show the world what struggling with psoriasis really looks like. "Psoriasis face," she wrote on her Instagram Story. Since the early days of her reality-TV fame, Kim Kardashian West has been incredibly forthcoming about not only having psoriasis, but also her fight to soothe the rashes and scaly patches that flare up as a result of the chronic skin condition.

  • Photographer captures the beauty of diversity by showcasing rare skin condition
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Photographer captures the beauty of diversity by showcasing rare skin condition

    A London exhibition is celebrating diversity by shining a light on those with the rare skin condition CMN.