• Selma Blair praises animal therapy for helping her ‘grow with self love’ following MS diagnosis
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    The Independent

    Selma Blair praises animal therapy for helping her ‘grow with self love’ following MS diagnosis

    Selma Blair has credited horseback riding for helping her “grow with self love” amid her ongoing battle with multiple sclerosis (MS).The actor, best known for her performances in Cruel Intentions, Legally Blonde and Hellboy, revealed in October 2018 that she’d been diagnosed with MS two months previously.The chronic condition can affect the brain and spinal cord, leading to symptoms including problems with vision, muscle spasms and fatigue, the NHS states.On Thursday, the star posted a photograph on Instagram of herself with her horse Sky Top and explained how animal therapy can provide relief to people living with chronic illnesses.In the photo’s caption, Blair said her trainer found her horse when she was struggling after the birth of her son, and that the animal has kept her feeling motivated.“We only had a short time before I couldn’t even get to him or stay on,” she said of her first few encounters with the horse.“But he has come so far. And even though I may seem like I have gone farther away, I am learning and getting healthier. Even as I get seemingly sicker,” Blair wrote.> View this post on Instagram> > After I gave birth and felt half dead all the time, after the rage and the tears, after my heart exploded with caring and understanding, before any diagnosis, I searched for this horse. I knew the only place I was really growing with self love was at @cellardoorequestrian . My trainer found me skytop. He needed to be able to handle kisses. Prerequisite. Truly. And he did. mrnibbles. We only had a short time before I couldn’t even get to him or stay on. But he has come so far. And even though I may seem like I have gone farther away, I am learning and getting healthier. Even as I get seemingly sicker. I will jump this horse around again. Affording horseshows will require some major work opportunities ahead. So I am asking for it all. I am asking. For all of us who want it. Ask. Ask. Listen. I have the unicorn. Now I have to be able to find him again. tbt. loveheals 💘> > A post shared by Selma Blair (@selmablair) on Jul 18, 2019 at 5:00am PDTWhile she is currently unable to ride the horse due to her illness, the actor said she is determined to ride the animal again.“Affording horse shows will require some major work opportunities ahead,” she added.Several of Blair’s followers have commented on her post praising her determination and courage.“You are such an incredible inspiration,” wrote one user.Another wrote: “Yes! You will ride again.”“Sorry Selma, I’ve got no words, just tears,” added another.According to the Mayo Clinic, animal-assisted therapy uses dogs or other animals to help people recover from or better cope with health problems such as heart disease, cancer and mental health disorders.> View this post on Instagram> > My staff. Good day. I get more comfortable as sun starts to go down. Does everybody? I wonder. It’s just a window for me. I have to be asleep by ten or never sleep.> > A post shared by Selma Blair (@selmablair) on May 20, 2019 at 4:11pm PDTIn 2017, the Royal College of Nursing drew up guidelines for medical institutions on how to use animal therapy safely and effectively, so all patients who might benefit are able to access it.Earlier this year, Blair opened up about her MS diagnosis, saying that when she learnt the diagnosis, she cried “tears of knowing I now had to give in to a body that had loss of control”.Blair told TV broadcaster Robin Roberts on Good Morning America that she’d unknowingly been experiencing symptoms of MS since the birth of her son in July 2011, and that she self-medicated when her son wasn’t with her.“You just have to, you can’t do it all,” the actor said. ”It’s fine to feel really crappy, and my son gets it, and now I’ve learnt not to feel guilty.”

  • Two thirds of parents wish the school holidays were shorter: here's how to survive them
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Two thirds of parents wish the school holidays were shorter: here's how to survive them

    Childcare, money and boredom all contribute to the school holiday stress.

  • Parkinson's disease: What are the symptoms and how can it be treated?
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    The Independent

    Parkinson's disease: What are the symptoms and how can it be treated?

    Parkinson’s disease is the world’s second most common neurodegenerative disorder, behind Alzheimer’s disease.Comedian Billy Connolly recently announced that he is due to return to television, having previously retired from stand-up comedy following the announcement of his Parkinson's disease diagnosis.While it’s unknown exactly why people develop the condition, according to Parkinson’s UK, experts believe its a combination of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the damage of nerve cells in the brain.So what are the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and how can it be treated? Here’s everything you need to know. What is Parkinson’s disease?Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative neurological condition.This means that over time the brain of an individual living with the disease becomes more damaged, the NHS explains.A person living with Parkinson’s disease doesn’t have enough of the chemical dopamine in their brain, the Parkinson’s Foundation states.Dopamine is responsible for transmitting signals between nerve cells in the brain.When an individual experiences a loss of nerve cells in the brain, this causes a reduction in the quantity of dopamine in the brain. What are the symptoms?The main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include involuntary shaking (otherwise known as tremors), movement that’s slower than usual and stiffness in the muscles, the NHS outlines.Other symptoms may include difficulty balancing, nerve pain, incontinence, insomnia, excessive sweating, depression and anxiety.For more information about the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, visit the NHS here. How many people does it affect?Around 145,000 people in the UK are affected by Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s UK explains.This means that around one in every 350 adults is living with the degenerative condition.According to the NHS, symptoms of Parkinson’s usually develop after the age of 50.However, for every one in 20 people affected by the disease, symptoms may appear when they’re under the age of 40.The Parkinson’s Foundation outlines that men are 1.5 more likely than women to be affected by the condition.High-profile individuals to have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s include former US president George H. W. Bush, Back to the Future star Michael J. Fox and The Chase star Paul Sinha. How can it be treated?While there is no known cure for Parkinson’s disease, symptoms may be controlled through treatment.The most common form of treatment used for the condition is medication, Parkinson’s UK states.“Drug treatments aim to increase the level of dopamine that reaches the brain and stimulate the parts of the brain where dopamine works,” the charity explains.The medication used to treat Parkinson’s disease varies according to each patient.This is because as symptoms of the disorder progress, the drugs used to treat the condition may need to be changed.While drug treatment may help to manage Parkinson’s symptoms, it cannot slow the progression of the disease.The NHS explains that those living with Parkinson’s disease may also undergo physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and, in rare cases, brain surgery to treat the condition.For more information about Parkinson’s disease, visit Parkinson’s UK.

  • Pampers develops sensor to track when baby’s nappy needs changing
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    The Independent

    Pampers develops sensor to track when baby’s nappy needs changing

    Pampers has developed a new smart sensor which alerts parents when their baby's nappy needs changing.Titled "Lumi by Pampers", the new product comes with two packs of nappies, two reusable detachable activity sensors and a WiFi-connected video monitor.By using the Lumi by Pampers app, which will be available on iPhone and Android, parents or guardians will be able to track an infant's activity, including when it has wet its nappy, the duration of its sleep and its feeding routine.The 1080p wide-angle HD video monitor, which has night vision, will also be able to track the temperature of the baby's bedroom and the humidity of the air.The information tracked on the app has an additional purpose other than being useful for parents.The app has also been designed to display data in a daily and weekly format, information which can then be shared with a baby's paediatrician.The nappies which come in the Lumi by Pampers pack have been designed with adhesive patches on the front, on top of which the detachable sensor is then place.The specially-designed nappies go up to size four, which would be used for babies weighing between seven to 18kg.While the smart sensor is undoubtedly innovative, it does have its setbacks.Despite having the ability to track when a baby's nappy is wet, it is unable to ascertain when an infant has defecated.Pampers has not yet revealed how much the Lumi by Pampers pack will retail for.However, the product is set to be released later this year.Earlier this week, research released by the World Health Organisation warned that many baby foods contain "inappropriately high levels of sugar".The investigation also found that several baby food products are being marketed incorrectly, as it states on the labels they're suitable for baby's under six months old despite the recommendation that baby's be exclusively breastfeed until they've reached that age."Food for infants and young children are expected to comply with various established nutrition and compositional recommendations," said Dr João Breda, head of the WHO European Office for Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases."Nonetheless, there are concerns that many products may still be too high in sugars."

  • Women with diabetes more at risk of heart failure than men, study warns
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    The Independent

    Women with diabetes more at risk of heart failure than men, study warns

    Women who have diabetes are at greater risk of experiencing heart failure than men with the same condition, a new study has warned.According to research published in the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), women who have type 1 diabetes have a 47 per cent increased possibility of heart failure than men who have type 1 diabetes.Furthermore, women who have type 2 diabetes have a nine per cent higher chance than men of heart failure, the findings showed.The researchers gathered their data from 14 studies in total, which consisted of 47 cohorts and more than 12 million participants.The team wrote in the study that the "prevalence of diabetes and heart failure is increasing", with an increased risk of heart failure being noted among people who have diabetes.However, whether or not this correlation was the same for women and men was previously "unknown".The scientists found that women with type 1 diabetes had a 5.15 higher chance of experiencing heart failure, while men with the same condition had a 3.47 increased risk.Meanwhile, women with type 2 diabetes had a 1.95 times greater possibility of having heart failure, with men having a 1.74 times higher chance.According to the study's authors, there a number of reasons why women with diabetes may be at greater risk than men of experiencing heart failure.One of these reasons could be the fact that diabetes may put women at higher risk than men of developing coronary heart disease.The researchers noted that an increased risk of coronary heart disease had previously been discovered among women.Another possible reason includes the "undertreatment for women with diabetes", which could "subsequently lead to a stronger association of diabetes with heart failure in women than men"."In conclusion, the excess risk of heart failure following diagnosis of diabetes is significantly greater in women than men, highlighting the importance of intensive prevention and treatment of diabetes for women as well as men," the authors wrote."Further research is required to understand the mechanisms underpinning the excess risk of heart failure conferred by diabetes – particularly type 1 – in women and to reduce the burden associated with diabetes in both sexes."Heart failure occurs when the heart is unable to pump blood around the body sufficiently, the British Heart Foundation states.It is a long-term condition, which gradually worsens over the time and for which there is no cure.Symptoms of heart failure include experiencing shortness of breath, having swelling on the feet, ankles, stomach and lower back area, and feeling fatigued or weak.For more information about heart failure, visit the British Heart Foundation website here.For more information about diabetes, visit the Diabetes UK website here.

  • Alexa Chung reveals she has endometriosis after hospital appointment: 'It sucks'
    Style
    The Independent

    Alexa Chung reveals she has endometriosis after hospital appointment: 'It sucks'

    Alexa Chung has revealed on Instagram that she suffers from endometriosis, adding that she thinks the condition "sucks".On Thursday, the television presenter-turned-fashion designer shared a photograph of herself on the social media platform standing in a hospital corridor with a cotton wool ball taped to her hand, suggesting she had an intravenous cannula temporarily placed in her hand.Chung captioned the post: “I don’t want to belong to any club that would accept me as a member, but here I am.”The 35-year-old tagged the image with several hashtags related to endometriosis including “endometriosisclub”, “sorryifyouhaveittooitsucks”, and “endometriosisawareness”.According to the NHS, endometriosis is a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the womb starts to grow in other places, such as the ovaries and fallopian tubes.> View this post on Instagram> > I don’t want to belong to any club that would accept me as a member, but here I am. endometriosisclub partytime woohoo lifelongmembership sorryifyouhaveittooitsucks endometriosisawareness> > A post shared by Alexa Chung (@alexachung) on Jul 18, 2019 at 3:57am PDTThe long-term health condition can affect women of any age, but it is most common in women in their 30s and 40s. Its symptoms can range from pain in the lower stomach and pelvis to discomfort during or after sex, and heavy bleeding during a woman’s menstrual cycle.Endometriosis UK estimates that one in 10 women of reproductive age in the UK suffer from the condition, making it the second most common gynaecological condition in the country. Several celebrities and the designer’s followers have commented on her post to share their messages of love and support.Broadcast journalist Stacey Dooley commented on the photograph with several heart emojis.US photographer and filmmaker Pamela Hanson posted a crying emoji, while French singer Lou Doillon wrote “same” with the hashtag “compassion”.Meanwhile, other women have shared their own stories about living with the condition.One user wrote: “Welcome to the tuffest club there is. Like fight club, but with a uterus. [sic]”Another added: “Diagnosed 38 years ago in the Bronze Age. A healthy pregnancy and twenty-four months of breast feeding radically changed my condition for the better for the duration of my childbearing years.”Chung later posted a selfie on Instagram Stories wearing a hospital and a patient identification bracelet. Her hand is placed over her stomach.The star joked in a caption written on the post: “This sexy lil number was completely open in the back and made from the finest printed cotton poplin.“Ties and trims are grosgrain ribbon. One size fits all. Stunning bracelet made from digital print paper and sellotape (every bangle is personalised to order).”Other celebrities to have spoken out about their diagnosis of endometriosis in recent years include actor Sarah Hyland, TV presenter Julia Bradbury, and Girls star Lena Dunham.In 2018, Dunham revealed that she had undergone a total hysterectomy – a procedure that surgically removes the cervix and uterus - following years of suffering from chronic pain as a result of endometriosis.Months later, she underwent additional surgery to remove her left ovary.

  • Charting the over-50 dads' club, as Michael Sheen announces he's expecting another child
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Charting the over-50 dads' club, as Michael Sheen announces he's expecting another child

    Late night nappy changes aren't a problem for these older fathers.

  • Parents in Germany to be fined over £2000 for not vaccinating their children against measles
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Parents in Germany to be fined over £2000 for not vaccinating their children against measles

    The move comes amid concern about the number of cases of measles.

  • Stacey Solomon praised by fans for ‘honesty’ as she opens up on ‘mum guilt’ after birth of baby Rex
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Stacey Solomon praised by fans for ‘honesty’ as she opens up on ‘mum guilt’ after birth of baby Rex

    Stacey Solomon was praised by her social media followers for sharing a candid post about her experiences with “mum guilt” following the birth of her son Rex.The Loose Women star, who welcomed her first child with partner Joe Swash in May, shared a photo of herself cuddled up with her baby on Instagram as she admitted that her day had been “gut wrenching.”“I feel like I shouldn’t really have these feelings because I’m nearly 8 weeks in and I am so incredibly lucky to have amazing children, a wonderful partner, loves loving, caring, & supportive family and I’m almost a bit embarrassed to say... That truth be told, I’m Having a bit of a gut wrenching day,” she wrote.“One of those days that physically hurts your tummy. I have absolutely no idea why. Mum guilt has kicked in full swing.”> View this post on Instagram> > I feel like I shouldn’t really have these feelings because I’m nearly 8 weeks in and I am so incredibly lucky to have amazing children, a wonderful partner, loves loving, caring, & supportive family and I’m almost a bit embarrassed to say... That truth be told, I’m Having a bit of a gut wrenching day. One of those days that physically hurts your tummy. I have absolutely no idea why. Mum guilt has kicked in full swing. Nothing in particular triggers the feeling. It’s just there. Tried to keep busy and organise the hell out of the house which has helped for short moments (but also felt guilty about it). So making a conscious effort to try to accept it and let the feelings come and go. I found this picture from a few days ago when I caught a rare snap of us both smiling at the same time (and when I’d miraculously found the energy to have fun with my make up drawer). I’ve been looking at it all day to remind myself that these feelings WILL pass and every day will be different. 💜 Thinking of anyone else having a struggle today or any day for that matter. 💜> > A post shared by Stacey Solomon (@staceysolomon) on Jul 17, 2019 at 11:03am PDTThe former X Factor contestant said that she was “making a conscious effort to try to accept” her emotions and to recognise that “feelings come and go.”She added that the “rare” photo of her and Rex smiling at the same time was a reminder “that these feelings WILL pass and every day will be different.”“Thinking of anyone else having a struggle today or any day for that matter,” she concluded.Solomon’s fans praised her “honest” approach to motherhood as they shared similar postnatal experiences.> View this post on Instagram> > Tummy time 😍 I forgot about all of the exciting things they do when they start spending more time awake! We played today for a good hour in between feeds and he’s even starting to try and lift up his head when he’s on my tummy! Aw it’s all starting to feel real now. His little personality is coming through and I’m here for it 😍🌈⭐️> > A post shared by Stacey Solomon (@staceysolomon) on Jul 10, 2019 at 11:00am PDT“Stacey you completely inspire me despite your celebrity status you don’t try to put on a front or s show to everyone that everything is perfect nothing is perfect and that’s OK,” one follower wrote. “I love that you are open and honest about life as a new mam.”“I needed this!” another comment read. “5 days in and baby blues have kicked in today - reminding myself that these feelings will pass.”“Thank you for these pasts @staceysolomon you make it OK for us mums to feel these things and accept them like you do!” a third said.The TV star has been open about her experiences with anxiety following Rex’s birth and last month revealed that she had been “feeling weird” about leaving the house with her newborn.Solomon is also mum to Zachary, 11, and Leighton, seven, from previous relationships. Swash also has a 12-year-old son, Harry, with his former fiancee.

  • Uproar on Twitter following KLM's proposed new breastfeeding policy
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Uproar on Twitter following KLM's proposed new breastfeeding policy

    "We may request a mother to cover herself while breastfeeding, should other passengers be offended by this."

  • Pretty Little Liars actor Shay Mitchell says miscarriage made her feel ‘broken’
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    The Independent

    Pretty Little Liars actor Shay Mitchell says miscarriage made her feel ‘broken’

    Shay Mitchell has opened up about how she felt "broken" following her miscarriage last year.The actor, who is currently expecting her first child with her partner Matte Babel, also touched upon the difficulty of being pregnant in the public eye.Earlier this year, the Pretty Little Liars star announced that she was expecting, sharing a photograph from a fashion shoot on Instagram and a two-minute video on YouTube titled: "Guess Who's Preggers."The previous year, the actor had experienced a miscarriage 14 weeks into her first pregnancy.In a new video shared on her YouTube channel, Mitchell explained that being pregnant can have a negative impact on one's personal sense of identity, especially when an expectant mother is keeping the news of her pregnancy a secret."This is the s****y side of being pregnant when no one knows, because you can't go out to see anyone, you don't want to see anyone. I don't feel like myself," the 32-year-old said in an emotional clip filmed prior to her pregnancy reveal."It really sort of messed me up a little bit," Mitchell stated, with regards to not being as sociable as she had been previously.In the video, the actor also detailed the shock she felt when she experienced a miscarriage, as she was "completely blindsided by it".Having been just over three months into her pregnancy, Mitchell said hadn't been aware of the percentage of pregnancies which end in miscarriage.According to the Miscarriage Association, around one in four pregnancies end in miscarriage."I still have those photos on my phone [of ultrasound scans] and I still have all the doctor visits and it's weird because I haven't looked at them, obviously. But it's not like I forgot about that happening," the You star stated."So of course I'm like super happy, but I still feel for that one that I lost."In the video, Mitchell led a tour around a bedroom which she described as the "baby's room", which has not yet been decorated.The actor explained that she wants to wait "as late as possible" to prepare the room for her first child due to her miscarriage experience.Mitchell stated that experiencing a miscarriage is "really tough because you feel broken as a woman".You can call the Miscarriage Association helpline on 01924 200799. The helpline is open Monday to Friday from 9am until 4pm.

  • UK children would rather grow up to be YouTubers than go to space, poll finds
    Style
    The Independent

    UK children would rather grow up to be YouTubers than go to space, poll finds

    There was once a time when the height of ambition for many children was to be fireman, police officer or even an astronaut.But now, in the age of Generation Influencer, it seems youngsters have other ideas as a third of young Britons and Americans want to be vloggers, new research reveals.To honour the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 Moon Landing on 16 July in 1969, the Lego Group conducted a survey of children regarding their thoughts on space exploration.The poll asked 3,000 children aged eight to 12 to choose from a list of five professions to answer which they would prefer to be when they grew up, including an astronaut, musician, professional athlete, teacher, or vlogger/YouTuber.The results showed British and American children were three times as likely (30 per cent) to want to be YouTubers or vloggers as astronauts (11 per cent) when they grow up. The preference to become a vlogger was followed by teacher (25 per cent), professional athlete (21 per cent) and musician (18 per cent). By contrast, children in China showed a clear preference for being an astronaut over any other potential profession with 56 per cent saying they would like to be the next person in space. This was followed by teacher (52 per cent), musician (47 per cent) and professional athlete (37 per cent) with vlogger/YouTuber coming last (18 per cent).Despite British and American children not wanting to pursue a career in space, the survey did reveal that the majority are interested in space exploration (86 per cent), with 90 per cent stating they would like to learn more. “We are thrilled that children continue to be interested in space exploration and can't wait to witness their 'small steps' and 'giant leaps' in decades to come,” said Michael McNally, senior director of brand relations, LEGO Systems, Inc. In 2018, a similar study conducted by telecommunications services provider O2 found that a growing number of children are aiming for careers in technology.The study of 2,000 parents and 2,000 children aged five to 16 found that the majority of British children are intent on pursuing jobs such as vloggers (30 per cent), animators (15 per cent) and software developers (14 per cent).

  • What It's Like To Navigate IVF At Work: 'I Had Extreme Fatigue And Hormonal Fluctuations'
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    HuffPost UK

    What It's Like To Navigate IVF At Work: 'I Had Extreme Fatigue And Hormonal Fluctuations'

    As the only female directorat her company, she says she didn't feel able to tell colleagues that she washaving IVF

  • Mum creates 'Don't Touch' signs for twin babies to avoid strangers' germs
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    Francesca Specter

    Mum creates 'Don't Touch' signs for twin babies to avoid strangers' germs

    The property landlord felt anxious about the health of her babies when strangers touched them.

  • Are parental allowances contributing to the death of the Saturday job?
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Are parental allowances contributing to the death of the Saturday job?

    Should parents stop giving children an allowance?

  • Kirsty, Gemma, Craig and Andrew: The baby names becoming 'extinct' in 2019
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Kirsty, Gemma, Craig and Andrew: The baby names becoming 'extinct' in 2019

    Goodbye, Kirsty and Craig – it's all about Lily and Noah now.

  • Obesity should be recognised as a disease, medical experts say
    Style
    The Independent

    Obesity should be recognised as a disease, medical experts say

    A number of medical experts are calling for obesity to be classed as a disease in order to encourage people to seek treatment.John Wilding, professor of medicine at the institute of ageing and chronic disease at the University of Liverpool, and Vicki Mooney, executive director of the European Coalition for People living with Obesity (EASO), argue that the view obesity is “self-inflicted and that it is the individual’s responsibility to do something about it, is “inaccurate” and reinforces stigma around being overweight.Instead, the pair believe that the role played by genetics combined with the illnesses created by obesity, such as Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and some cancers, means it should be defined as a disease.According to the NHS, obesity is thought to affect around one in every four adults in the UK, and roughly one in five children aged 10 to 11.Body mass index (BMI) is widely used as a simple and reliable way of finding out whether a person is a healthy weight for their height.For most adults, the NHS states that having a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 means you’re considered to be a healthy weight. A person with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered to be overweight, and someone with a BMI over 30 is considered to be obese.Wilding and Mooney add that the Oxford Dictionary supports their argument with its definition of disease as “a disorder of structure or function ... especially one that produces specific symptoms ... and is not simply a direct result of physical injury”.They also state that obesity, in which excess body fat has accumulated to such an extent that health may be adversely affected, has been considered a disease by the World Health Organisation since 1936.“Studies in twins show that 40-70 per cent of the variability in weight is inherited,” Wilding and Mooney write in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) to bolster the theory that obesity is influenced by genetics.“Body weight, fat distribution, and risk of complications are strongly influenced by biology – it is not an individual’s fault if they develop obesity.”The pair add that recognising obesity as a chronic disease with severe complications rather than a lifestyle choice could help “reduce the stigma and discrimination experienced by many people with obesity”.They write: “Instead of discouraging them from seeking treatment it should give them permission to do so.“The stigmatisation of obesity leaves patients fearful of discussing their weight, and they turn to fad diets or non-prescription medication because they assume that their obesity is solely their responsibility.”However, not all medical professionals agree with Wilding and Mooney’s stance on the issue.In contrast, Dr Richard Pile, a GP from St Albans, said the Oxford Dictionary definition of disease “is so vague that we can classify almost anything as a disease”.Also writing in the BMJ, Pile argues that recommending a change implies that current NHS and public health strategies are “doomed to failure without classifying obesity as a disease“.”Labelling obesity as a disease risks reducing autonomy, disempowering and robbing people of the intrinsic motivation that is such an important enabler of change,” Pile adds.“It encourages fatalism, promoting the fallacy that genetics are destiny.”The debate in the BMJ follows calls from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) in January for the Government and the NHS to urgently recognise obesity as a disease.The RCP said it wanted to see obesity recognised as an ongoing chronic disease to allow the creation of formal healthcare policies to improve care both in doctors’ surgeries and hospitals.It argued that obesity is not a lifestyle choice caused by individual greed “but a disease caused by health inequalities, genetic influences and social factors”.

  • How much caffeine is it safe for children to consume - and what are the side effects?
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    How much caffeine is it safe for children to consume - and what are the side effects?

    A single can of energy drink can contain more caffeine than children should consume in an entire day.

  • Concerns raised over the 'cocktail of chemicals' found in British mothers' breast milk due to home furnishings
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Concerns raised over the 'cocktail of chemicals' found in British mothers' breast milk due to home furnishings

    UK mothers’ breast milk has some of the highest concentrations of flame retardants in the world.

  • Mum warns other parents about lead poisoning risk
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Mum warns other parents about lead poisoning risk

    A mum has discovered her three-year-old has lead poisoning contracted from a lead bath.

  • Amazon Prime Day 2019: Top deals for parents
    Style
    Yahoo Style UK

    Amazon Prime Day 2019: Top deals for parents

    Among the top discounts are hundreds of brilliant savings on baby and children’s products, including toys, security blankets, car seats, bouncers and more.

  • What Meghan and Beyoncé really spoke about at yesterday's Lion King premiere
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    What Meghan and Beyoncé really spoke about at yesterday's Lion King premiere

    Turns out they're just like any off-duty parents.

  • This Morning’s Emmy Kenny shares grief over father’s death: ‘My dad sadly lost his battle to psychosis’
    Style
    The Independent

    This Morning’s Emmy Kenny shares grief over father’s death: ‘My dad sadly lost his battle to psychosis’

    This Morning’s resident psychologist Emma Kenny has opened up about the grief of losing her father to suicide in a heartbreaking video posted on social media.Kenny, who regularly addresses mental health issues on the ITV programme, explained her father had been struggling with psychosis for eight months and “sadly lost his battle” with the condition on Monday.“He took his own life,” the 45-year-old said in the video, “I found him but I was just about 30 seconds too late, I didn't get that chance".The TV psychologist had previously spoken out about her father’s illness with her fans and went on to thank them for their continued support.“My dad’s end does not define who he was,” Kenny continued. “Mental illness does not define you. He was the strongest, the most wonderful and most beautiful human being you could’ve ever met.”Kenny went on to criticise mental health services in the UK, saying she was “ashamed” of the care available to her father.“I’m sorry for any of you who are going through this,” she added, referring to the grief of losing someone through suicide, before proceeding to offer some advice to those with family members who are struggling with their mental health.“Just go that extra mile for somebody who’s in need,” she said. “It could feel relentless, frustrating, boring annoying, it can aggravate you when someone is constantly mentally unwell but they’re not doing it on purpose.”Kenny continued: “Notice that person who’s quiet in the office. Notice that individual whose mood seems to have changed. If somebody’s asked for attention, give it to them. “Thanks for all your support. I’m sorry it’s not a happy video. I know all of you would’ve wished for it to be a different outcome.”Kenny’s video has prompted a wave of support from fans, with thousands of people offering their condolences and thanking the psychologist for speaking out.> So sorry for your loss Emma, you are right the mental health service in this country is awful. I've been supporting a relative for the past year who has bipolar and sometimes it isn't easy but we are all has as the servicea just aren't there. Take care of yourself, thinking of u> > — Louise (@LouiseLacy) > > July 10, 2019“So sorry to hear this Emma,” wrote one person on Twitter. “It doesn’t define him as you say and we cannot control the outcome. You did your best and you father knew that. Sending lots of love and puppy love to you.”Another added: “Oh Emma, I am so very sorry to hear of your loss. Sending you lots of love and hugs your way. Mental health and suicide, particularly in men, must be tackled to become less taboo. Only then can we save lives. You’re in my thoughts.”If you have been affected by any issues mentioned in this article, you can contact The Samaritans for free on 116 123 or any of the following mental health organisations:mind.org.ukmentalhealth.org.uk

  • Meghan Markle mum-shamed for how she held Archie - but experts say she's done nothing wrong
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Meghan Markle mum-shamed for how she held Archie - but experts say she's done nothing wrong

    "Can someone please show Meghan how to hold a baby?"