• Children become less active with each year of primary school
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Children become less active with each year of primary school

    By the time they leave primary school children are doing more than an hour less physical activity per week.

  • Obesity isn't a choice – nor is it 'down to a lack of willpower'
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Obesity isn't a choice – nor is it 'down to a lack of willpower'

    Weight is more influenced by a mixture of genes and socio-economic background, says a new report.

  • Piers Morgan defends comedian who says fat-shaming will help cure obesity
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    Francesca Specter

    Piers Morgan defends comedian who says fat-shaming will help cure obesity

    The 'Good Morning Britain' host said the controversial US comedian Bill Maher was in the right.

  • How much sugar is in your favourite 'healthy' drink?
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    How much sugar is in your favourite 'healthy' drink?

    Many of our favourite drinks surpass the NHS guidelines in one bottle.

  • Doctor slated for saying people are 'programmed to be fat', but do obesity genes really exist?
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    Francesca Specter

    Doctor slated for saying people are 'programmed to be fat', but do obesity genes really exist?

    Plus, what to do if you think you are genetically predisposed to be overweight.

  • Cadbury's to bring all chocolate bars under 100 calories
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    Caroline Allen

    Cadbury's to bring all chocolate bars under 100 calories

    The move will see Cadbury’s reduce the size of its individual snacks.

  • Parents 'aren't fit enough' to keep up with their children
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Parents 'aren't fit enough' to keep up with their children

    Half of UK parents are worried about how they’ll keep up with the children over the six-week holidays.

  • Women told by UK's top doctor to eat two fewer biscuits a day or risk cancer
    Style
    Lauren Clark

    Women told by UK's top doctor to eat two fewer biscuits a day or risk cancer

    Two McVitie’s milk chocolate digestive biscuits contain 166 calories.

  • 'Waist size as important as BMI in defining obesity'
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    'Waist size as important as BMI in defining obesity'

    The size of the waist is also an important indicator of overall health.

  • Three in four adults are not getting enough sleep, report suggests
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Three in four adults are not getting enough sleep, report suggests

    Lack of sleep increases risk of obesity, depression and anxiety.

  • Obesity overtakes smoking as risk factor for four common cancers
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    Francesca Specter

    Obesity overtakes smoking as risk factor for four common cancers

    In cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer, obesity is a bigger risk factor.

  • Gym causes outrage by asking women 'can you pinch your fat?'
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    Caroline Allen

    Gym causes outrage by asking women 'can you pinch your fat?'

    It urges its members to “call it what it is... FAT”.

  • Children at risk of obesity due to sleep deprivation
    Style
    The Independent

    Children at risk of obesity due to sleep deprivation

    Thousands of children aren’t getting enough sleep and are consequently putting themselves at a greater risk of obesity, a poll suggests.A survey conducted by the British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) of more than 6,000 children found that 32 per cent of primary school pupils and 70 per cent of secondary school students get less than nine hours of sleep a night, the minimum recommended amount.Half of those in secondary school also reported waking up in the middle of the night at least once.The survey also looked at the eating habits of the children and found that a quarter of secondary school students and one in ten primary school pupils had not eaten breakfast that day.Meanwhile, it seems that many others could be missing out on key nutrients, with only 18 per cent of secondary school students consuming fruit or vegetables in their first meal of the day.Nearly two in three (59 per cent) of this group said they used a screen before bedtime, with 49 per cent of primary school group saying the same, leading scientists to believe that this might be to blame for their poor sleep.The poll also examined the sleeping patterns of more than 1,500 adults and found that 43 per cent of them get fewer than seven hours of kip a night while 80 per cent reported waking up at least once in the night. Half of those surveyed also said they used some kind of screen-based device before going to sleep.Dr Lucy Chambers, senior scientist at the BNF, said a bad night’s sleep can lead both adults and children to make unhealthy decisions when it comes to their food.“Where lack of, and disturbed, sleep can lead to both adults and young people feeling grumpy and irritable, regular poor-quality sleep can have a negative impact on dietary choices, including higher intakes of calories and more frequent snacking on less healthy foods,” she explained.“The BNF’s Task Force report, published earlier this year, highlighted that lack of sleep, and interrupted sleep, may be linked to an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension.”The findings reflect those of a previous report published in Science Advances, which found that a night of missed sleep could leave you feeling physically weaker and more at risk of obesity.