• Woman transforms wine-stained outfit into 'genius' tie-dye look
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    Danielle Fowler

    Woman transforms wine-stained outfit into 'genius' tie-dye look

    "This is the kind of positive thinking we all need."

  • Number of overweight children rises by a fifth because of lazy summer holidays spent staring at screens
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    The Telegraph

    Number of overweight children rises by a fifth because of lazy summer holidays spent staring at screens

    Obesity levels are soaring over school summer holidays because children are spending four hours a day staring at their screens, research suggests.

  • Courteney Cox, 55, flies out of swimming pool in age-defying bikini video
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    Francesca Specter

    Courteney Cox, 55, flies out of swimming pool in age-defying bikini video

    The 'Friends' star is Bond girl meets superhero in this clever video.

  • Royals release new photos of Prince George to celebrate his 6th birthday
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    Danielle Stacey

    Royals release new photos of Prince George to celebrate his 6th birthday

    Kate Middleton photographed her oldest son, who is third in line to the throne.

  • 10 Etiquette Lessons We've Learned From the Royals
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    Harper's Bazaar

    10 Etiquette Lessons We've Learned From the Royals

    There are eight words we know Kate has never said to the Queen. From Harper's BAZAAR

  • Who is Lady Kitty Spencer's rumoured 60-year-old boyfriend?
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    Danielle Stacey

    Who is Lady Kitty Spencer's rumoured 60-year-old boyfriend?

    Princess Diana's niece is reportedly dating fashion tycoon Michael Lewis.

  • ‘Prince Harry chose a Pippa Middleton-replica in Meghan Markle’
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    Danielle Stacey

    ‘Prince Harry chose a Pippa Middleton-replica in Meghan Markle’

    A royal commentator claims that Kate's sister Pippa and Meghan are "quite similar characters."

  • Tess Holliday responds to 'health concerns' over swimsuit photo: 'No one cares'
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    Francesca Specter

    Tess Holliday responds to 'health concerns' over swimsuit photo: 'No one cares'

    “This is unhealthy. She is slowing dying. Her heart will not be able to keep up very soon,” read one user’s comment.

  • Cheap flights blamed as skin cancer rates soar by 45 per cent in a decade
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    The Independent

    Cheap flights blamed as skin cancer rates soar by 45 per cent in a decade

    Rates of melanoma skin cancers have soared by 45 per cent in the past decade as cheap international flights have fuelled a new generation of sun chasers, charities have warned.Melanomas are rarer but more serious than non-melanoma skin cancers and rates have risen most steeply among men and the under-50s, a Cancer Research UK analysis found.In a warning to holidaymakers, who are now able to jet off to warmer climes several times a year, the charity said skin damage in your earlier years can permanently increase your cancer risk.Melanoma begins in pigment-producing melanocyte cells and is the UK’s fifth most common cancer, with 16,000 people diagnosed annually.However, it is the second most common in people aged 25 to 49 and experts warn as many as 90 per cent of cases could be prevented with simple sun protection.Cancer Research UK has launched a campaign to encourage people to embrace their natural skin tone and warn of the perils of chasing the perfect tan.“While some might think that a tan is a sign of good health, there is no such thing as a healthy tan,” Michelle Mitchell, chief executive of the charity, said. “It’s actually your body trying to protect itself from harmful rays.“These statistics highlight the importance of our Own Your Tone campaign, which encourages people to embrace their natural skin tone and adopt sun-safe behaviours.”Between 2004/06 and 2014/16, the most recent data available, melanoma rates have risen by 55 per cent in men and 35 per cent in women. Across all cases, the rise was from 18 cases per 100,000 people in the population to 26 per 100,000.While melanoma is still more common in those aged over 65, rates for 25- to 49-year-olds have increased by 70 per cent since the 1990s.The jump has been from nine cases per 100,000 people in 1993/1995 to 16 per 100,000 in 2014/2016.According to Cancer Research UK, the rise of package holidays in the 1970s and a more recent surge in cheap flights has seen more people going abroad, sometimes several times a year, putting their skin at risk from strong sun.Improved awareness of the disease, has also been a factor with more people seeking a diagnosis for suspect moles and blemishes.Getting sunburnt just once every two years triples the risk of melanoma.Karis Betts, health information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “Sun safety is not just for when you’re going abroad, the sun can be strong enough to burn in the UK from the start of April to the end of September.“We want to encourage people to embrace their natural look and protect their skin from UV damage by seeking shade, covering up and regularly applying sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and four or five stars.”Susannah Brown, head of research interpretation at the World Cancer Research Fund, said: “These figures are shocking, but a positive message to take out of this research is that skin cancer is preventable.“Our own research has shown that unlike many other cancers, diet and exercise patterns do not appear to be strongly associated with your risk of skin cancer and that it is the sun that continues to be the main cause.”

  • Wedding photographer calls out guest for ruining 'once in a lifetime moment' by taking out cell phone
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    Mahira Dayal

    Wedding photographer calls out guest for ruining 'once in a lifetime moment' by taking out cell phone

    What exactly do you plan on doing with that photo? Honestly. Are you going to print it out? Save it? Look at it everyday? No. You're not.

  • Photo of 'hot' border patrol agent, known as 'ICE Bae,' goes viral
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    Tanya Edwards

    Photo of 'hot' border patrol agent, known as 'ICE Bae,' goes viral

    A female Border Patrol officer has gone viral after photos emerged of her providing security for Vice President Mike Pence during his recent border visit.

  • Meghan and Harry should be 'less Hollywood' royal expert claims
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    Caroline Allen

    Meghan and Harry should be 'less Hollywood' royal expert claims

    She says it’s the palace’s job to encourage Meghan and Harry to become “less Hollywood glamour and more royal."

  • Nadiya Hussain wants you to make roast potatoes from a tin
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    The Telegraph

    Nadiya Hussain wants you to make roast potatoes from a tin

    It is a decade since Delia Smith scandalised the nation when her ‘How to Cheat’ series recommended - horror of horrors - frozen mashed potato. Now Nadiya Hussain is risking the same fate by getting her roast potatoes from a tin.

  • Archie's Christening Photos Are So Much Like the Cambridge Children's Portraits
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    Harper's Bazaar

    Archie's Christening Photos Are So Much Like the Cambridge Children's Portraits

    The latest royal christening didn't stray far from tradition, after all.

  • What Happens to Your Body When You Give Up All Sugar
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    Men's Health

    What Happens to Your Body When You Give Up All Sugar

    This is how your body reacts.

  • Archie’s godparents not ‘celebrities’ as Meghan and Harry keep christening details private
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    Danielle Stacey

    Archie’s godparents not ‘celebrities’ as Meghan and Harry keep christening details private

    There's been much speculation about who Archie's godparents will be.

  • Fans worry for 'scarily thin' Celine Dion after fashion week appearance
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    Kristine Tarbert

    Fans worry for 'scarily thin' Celine Dion after fashion week appearance

    A recent outfit has caused more concern for the 51-year-old singer.

  • Demi Lovato hits back at body-shaming trolls: 'I'm choosing not to diet'
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    Danielle Fowler

    Demi Lovato hits back at body-shaming trolls: 'I'm choosing not to diet'

    The singer has struggled with bulimia in the past.

  • Black women almost twice as likely to suffer stillbirths, study shows
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    The Independent

    Black women almost twice as likely to suffer stillbirths, study shows

    Black women are almost twice as likely to experience a stillbirth as white women according to ‘alarming’ research which experts said show the effects of racial and social inequalities in society.Researchers from Queen Mary University London reviewed data from more than 15 million pregnancies across 13 studies run in countries including the US and UK.While stillbirths are rare complications, the study found black women were 1.5 to two times more likely to experience them.The researchers also found pregnancies which were overdue and went beyond 41 weeks' gestation were significantly more likely to be stillborn.The risk increased from 0.11 stillbirths per 1,000 pregnancies at 37 weeks, to 3.18 per 1,000 pregnancies at 42 weeks, regardless of ethnicity.But experts said the increased risk for black women is just the “tip of the iceberg” of a range of health inequalities experienced by members of minority groups.“The alarming feature is the persistence of this gap, and the fact we do not know what the causes are because we’re not doing the research,” Dr Jenny Douglas, of the Open University, and founder of the Black Women’s Health and Wellbeing Research Network, told The Independent.“It’s not just stillbirth, in terms of maternal mortality black women in the UK are five times more likely to die in pregnancy and childbirth than white women.”She said that the causes are complex and other health issues like obesity, blood pressure and diabetes play a role and are closely linked to socioeconomic factors like poverty and education.Cultural differences in the way women from black communities access healthcare are also likely to be a factor, as is their treatment by health staff, employers and other parts of society.“We also need to look at the social factors in terms of the experiences black women have of racism, discrimination and racialised sexism.”While small studies can identify these issues she said the UK needs an equivalent of the 59,000-strong Black Women’s Health Study which has been running in the US since 1995.Professor Shakila Thangaratinam, who led the research published in the journal PLOS One, said: “The increase in stillbirth risks for black women could be attributed to various factors such as social and environmental conditions, reduced access to antenatal care, and potential increased rates of foetal growth restriction.”

  • Obesity beats cigarettes as cause of four types of cancer, analysis finds
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    The Independent

    Obesity beats cigarettes as cause of four types of cancer, analysis finds

    Obese people now outnumber smokers by two to one, Cancer Research UK has warned, as it said obesity causes more cases of some cancers than cigarettes.The charity said more needs to be done to help people lose weight to reduce their risk of cancer.Smoking is still the UK’s biggest preventable cause of cancer and carries a much higher risk of the disease than obesity.But obesity is a cause of 13 different types of cancer, and trumps smoking as a leading cause for four of these types, Cancer Research UK said.Its analysis shows that excess weight causes around 1,900 more cases of bowel cancer than smoking in the UK each year.It also causes 1,400 more cases of kidney cancer, 460 more cases of ovarian cancer and 180 cases of liver cancer.National data shows that around one in three adults in the UK are obese, while around a third more are overweight.One in 10 children are obese by the age of five, rising to one in five by age 11.The Cancer Research UK analysis used data from 2017 to show there were around 13.4 million non-smoking adults who were obese.Meanwhile, 6.3 million adult smokers were not obese and 1.5 million adult smokers were.Michelle Mitchell, Cancer Research UK’s chief executive, said: “As smoking rates fall and obesity rates rise, we can clearly see the impact on a national health crisis when the government puts policies in place – and when it puts its head in the sand.“Our children could be a smoke-free generation, but we’ve hit a devastating record high for childhood obesity, and now we need urgent government intervention to end the epidemic. They still have a chance to save lives.“Scientists have so far identified that obesity causes 13 types of cancer but the mechanisms aren’t fully understood.“So further research is needed to find out more about the ways extra body fat can lead to cancer.”The charity is calling on the government to act on its ambition to halve childhood obesity rates by 2030 and introduce a 9pm watershed for junk food adverts on TV and online.Other measures should include restricting promotional offers on unhealthy food and drinks, it said.Professor Linda Bauld, Cancer Research UK’s prevention expert, said: “There isn’t a silver bullet to reduce obesity, but the huge fall in smoking over the years – partly thanks to advertising and environmental bans – shows that Government-led change works.“It was needed to tackle sky-high smoking rates, and now the same is true for obesity.”PA

  • Anyone with more than 30,000 social media followers considered a celebrity, advertising watchdog rules
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    The Telegraph

    Anyone with more than 30,000 social media followers considered a celebrity, advertising watchdog rules

    Anyone with more than 30,000 social media followers is now considered a celebrity and subject to advertising rules, a watchdog has ruled in a landmark case.

  • Facebook announces crackdown on misleading health content
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    The Telegraph

    Facebook announces crackdown on misleading health content

    Facebook is cracking down on posts pushing miracle cures, misleading health claims and weight-loss pills.

  • Duchess of Cambridge praised for swapping royal box for a 'normal seat' at Wimbledon
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    Francesca Specter

    Duchess of Cambridge praised for swapping royal box for a 'normal seat' at Wimbledon

    The Duchess opted to sit outside of the Royal Box.