• Gyms opening: How to stay safe and what are the new rules?
    Health
    The Independent

    Gyms opening: How to stay safe and what are the new rules?

    In the days before coronavirus, sweat-inducing classes were a vital part of many people’s routines. But after prime minister Boris Johnson ordered all gyms to close as part of the nationwide lockdown on 23 March, people were forced to find other ways to get their fitness fix.Last month, the general consensus was that the date for the grand reopening of gyms would be 4 July, alongside other personal care establishments such as hairdressers.

  • Coronavirus: Does obesity make the virus more dangerous?
    Health
    The Independent

    Coronavirus: Does obesity make the virus more dangerous?

    Following his admittance to intensive care with coronavirus in April, prime minister Boris Johnson is reportedly preparing a more “interventionist” drive to tackle UK obesity in the ongoing and long-term fight against Covid-19.On 10 July, a report in The Times suggested Mr Johnson would ban supermarket promotions of unhealthy food and introduce a 9pm watershed for unhealthy food advertisements.

  • Zach Braff urges mask-wearing after suggesting Nick Cordero caught Covid-19 from someone without symptoms
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Zach Braff urges mask-wearing after suggesting Nick Cordero caught Covid-19 from someone without symptoms

    Zach Braff has urged people to wear masks even if they don’t have symptoms of coronavirus following the death of his friend, broadway star Nick Cordero, who died due to complications with Covid-19.Cordero died on Sunday night after spending more than three months in hospital with the virus.

  • No facials, pre-treatment showers and temperature checks: How spas will look when they reopen after lockdown
    Health
    The Independent

    No facials, pre-treatment showers and temperature checks: How spas will look when they reopen after lockdown

    After months of lockdown spent juggling working from home with parenting, health concerns and financial woes, many of us have been left feeling anxious, fatigued and highly strung.If there was ever a time for self-care it is now. The ultimate spa experience is something many of us are desperate to indulge in, with our sunlight-starved skin and poor posture longing to be pacified by the hands of a professional while surrounded by lavender scented spritzes and soft music.

  • Gemma Collins opens up about ‘traumatic’ miscarriage while unknowingly pregnant
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Gemma Collins opens up about ‘traumatic’ miscarriage while unknowingly pregnant

    Gemma Collins has opened up about a “traumatising” miscarriage she experienced in 2012.The Only Way Is Essex (TOWIE) star spoke about the incident during a recent episode of her BBC podcast, The Gemma Collins Podcast, and revealed the miscarriage happened when she was unknowingly four months pregnant.

  • 100 days since Megxit: How the couple who were supposed to ‘modernise the monarchy’ turned their backs on it
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    100 days since Megxit: How the couple who were supposed to ‘modernise the monarchy’ turned their backs on it

    The 9 July marks 100 days since Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stood down as senior members of the royal family. The break, which became widely known as 'Megxit', marked a new chapter in the history of the monarchy. But why did it happen? [This article was originally published in January 2020].It was the relationship that was supposed to mark the modernisation of the monarchy; instead, it became a turbulent tale of celebrity obsession, social media and family turmoil. In January, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry announced that they would be stepping down as senior members of the royal family in a move that shocked the world – yet wasn’t entirely unexpected.

  • Vaginal mesh complications often labelled as ‘women’s problems’ and thousands could have been spared, review finds
    Health
    The Independent

    Vaginal mesh complications often labelled as ‘women’s problems’ and thousands could have been spared, review finds

    A new review has stressed how many women who voiced concerns regarding vaginal mesh procedure complications were dismissed as having “women’s problems”.The report, published by The Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review, which is chaired by Baroness Julia Cumberlege, found that “thousands” of women could have been spared from complications following vaginal mesh surgery.

  • Nick Cordero: Amanda Kloots shares photos and videos from late husband's phone
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Nick Cordero: Amanda Kloots shares photos and videos from late husband's phone

    Amanda Kloots has shared some of her favourite moments captured by her husband Nick Cordero, who died on Sunday from coronavirus complications at the age of 41.On Tuesday, Amanda posted a series of the photos and videos she found on her late husband’s phone after opening it for the first time since he was hospitalised with Covid-19.

  • Paris Jackson opens up about mental health and suicide attempts: ‘I’m not even close to loving myself’
    Entertainment
    The Independent

    Paris Jackson opens up about mental health and suicide attempts: ‘I’m not even close to loving myself’

    Paris Jackson has opened up about her mental health struggles and revealed she has attempted suicide “many times”.During the latest episode of her Facebook Watch series, titled Unfiltered: Paris Jackson and Gabriel Glenn, the daughter of Michael Jackson discussed her ongoing body image issues and said she turned to self-harm as a way of coping after her father's death.

  • Usain Bolt reveals baby daughter's unique olympics-inspired name and shares first photos
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Usain Bolt reveals baby daughter's unique olympics-inspired name and shares first photos

    Usain Bolt has shared the first photos of his newborn daughter and also announced her name.The retired Olympic athlete welcomed his baby girl with long-time girlfriend Kasi Bennett in May, however the couple have chosen to keep the new arrival private until now.

  • Almost a third of Britons would refuse coronavirus vaccine ‘or are unsure’, survey finds
    News
    The Independent

    Almost a third of Britons would refuse coronavirus vaccine ‘or are unsure’, survey finds

    Almost a third of people in the UK would definitely not have a coronavirus vaccine or are not sure whether they would, a new poll has found.Between 24 and 25 June, YouGov conducted a survey of 1,663 people in Britain, on behalf of research group Centre for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH).

  • How to get a better night's sleep
    Health
    AOL

    How to get a better night's sleep

    Getting the recommended seven to nine hours sleep a night is an extremely important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Going without quality shut eye for a prolonged period of time can have major effects on fitness and wellbeing, and your

  • Army major walking barefoot from Cornwall to Edinburgh to fund treatment for daughter with rare disease
    Health
    The Independent

    Army major walking barefoot from Cornwall to Edinburgh to fund treatment for daughter with rare disease

    An army major is walking the length of the UK barefoot to help fund treatment for his eight-year-old daughter, who has a rare disease.On Monday, Major Christopher Brannigan will begin his walk without shoes from Cornwall to Edinburgh via Downing Street while carrying 25kg kit to raise awareness of those affected by rare diseases.

  • Vogue Portugal apologises and removes ‘offensive’ cover accused of glamourising mental illness
    Health
    The Independent

    Vogue Portugal apologises and removes ‘offensive’ cover accused of glamourising mental illness

    Vogue Portugal has pulled one of its magazine covers from newsstands after it was criticised for romanticising mental illness.In a statement posted on Instagram, the publication said: “On such an important issue such as mental health we cannot be divided.

  • Gigi Hadid criticises British Vogue for claiming she’s ‘disguising’ her baby bump
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Gigi Hadid criticises British Vogue for claiming she’s ‘disguising’ her baby bump

    Gigi Hadid has criticised British Vogue after the publication shared an article claiming Gigi Hadid was “disguising” her pregnancy.The 25-year-old model is pregnant with her first child with boyfriend Zayn Malik.

  • Charlize Theron says homeschooling her children in quarantine has been ‘incredibly stressful’
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Charlize Theron says homeschooling her children in quarantine has been ‘incredibly stressful’

    Charlize Theron has spoken about the struggles of homeschooling her children while at home during the coronavirus pandemic, saying she would much rather make intense action films than become their teacher again.Theron has two daughters – eight-year-old Jackson, who she adopted in 2012, and four-year-old August, who she adopted in July 2015.

  • Tom Hanks says discomfort from coronavirus was ‘pretty much done in two weeks’
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Tom Hanks says discomfort from coronavirus was ‘pretty much done in two weeks’

    Tom Hanks has opened up about his experience of having Covid-19, revealing that he experienced symptoms such as body aches and fatigue for two weeks.Speaking to The Guardian, the actor explained that he wasn’t scared by being unwell with the virus, which his wife, Rita Wilson, also had.

  • Kate Garraway says husband Derek Draper has opened his eyes but remains in intensive care
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Kate Garraway says husband Derek Draper has opened his eyes but remains in intensive care

    Kate Garraway says her husband Derek Draper has emerged from a “deeper coma” and is now in a minimal state of consciousness.The Good Morning Britain presenter’s husband has been in hospital since March when he was placed in an induced coma after contracting coronavirus.

  • Prince Charles praises ‘remarkably selfless’ healthcare workers on 72nd anniversary of NHS
    News
    The Independent

    Prince Charles praises ‘remarkably selfless’ healthcare workers on 72nd anniversary of NHS

    Prince Charles has paid tribute to the ”remarkably selfless” healthcare workers who have been taking care of others throughout the coronavirus pandemic to mark the 72nd anniversary of the NHS.On 5 July 1948, the national health service was launched by then-minister for health Aneurin Bevan.

  • How I created a tropical jungle garden... on my patio in Clapham
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    How I created a tropical jungle garden... on my patio in Clapham

    Few of us will be going anywhere exotic this year but don’t worry, I have a plan. Bring the tropics to you with an atmospheric garden full of emerald leaves and glowing flowers. For instant impact and a long season of interest, turning your garden tropical is an excellent choice. Traditional tropical stalwarts include the hardy banana, tree fern, Chusan palm and red hot poker. As useful and lovely as these are, tropical gardens have evolved. A new trend has extended its coiled tendril to redefine the genre. In my own designs I’ve been bringing a naturalistic planting approach to tropical gardens, and using unusual new plants for greater creativity. The natural look I was in denial about our garden. “It’s not tropical,” I’d defiantly say to puzzled faces, until I realised one day that that was exactly what I’d created. It simply didn’t look like the tropical gardens I knew. Our living room looks through bifold doors on to a half-sun, half-shade patio, which I’ve filled over the past six years with luxurious rarities, colourful gems to be treasured. I find that having exotic plants close to the house jolts me out of whatever head space I’m in to one of calmness through curiosity. Employing naturalistic planting techniques – usually seen with grasses and airy perennials – while using tropical-look plants, recreates the feel of a wild jungle to wade through. I have paddle-shaped leaves of Canna ‘Shenandoah’, hardy in mild areas, pushing vertically through spreading mounds of Persicaria neofiliformis, both competing with Phytolacca ‘Laka Boom’ (possibly the greatest name in horticulture).

  • 25 of the best gardens to visit this summer
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    25 of the best gardens to visit this summer

    Gardening is a profession where social distancing is a real possibility. So there is no reason to anticipate that standards will necessarily have fallen, now that they are opening up again. There may even be new things to see at familar gardens, as head gardeners have been taking the opportunity to do jobs and projects which have been put on the back-burner in previous seasons, while the gardens themselves have benefited from a well-deserved break from the attentions of hundreds or thousands of visitors. Cafes and restaurants at gardens may be closed or offering takeaway meals only, but picnicking is now being positively encouraged. Perhaps now is the time to dust off the old thermos flask and picnic hamper, and try one more time to make that perfect cucumber sandwich? As lockdown is eased, Britain’s great gardens are opening up again. At present, many gardens are open to pre-booked visitors only – but while on the one hand this requires some forward planning, on the other there are likely to be fewer people once you get there, and most likely a better experience of the site. The need to plan also presents the opportunity to draw up an itinerary of favourites. There is much to look forward to, and there is surely a garden out there to suit every taste and temperament. We have indicated in each case if pre-booking is required. Best for classic herbaceous borders Newby Hall, North Yorkshire

  • Lovable rogues: five of the best corydalis varieties that like to suit themselves
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Lovable rogues: five of the best corydalis varieties that like to suit themselves

    Something wonderful arrived in the post this week: three little feathery clumps in 9cm pots, from the Beth Chatto nursery in Essex. The feathery clumps are Corydalis cheilanthifolia, a species of fumewort – similar but separate from close cousin, fumitory – that I have wanted to get my hands on for months. For me, this species is the zenith of its genus, raising yellow flowers to new heights and amplifying a characteristically delicate, pinnate foliage to the point of actually being mistaken for a fern. The leaves also redden for autumn. So a fern with flowers and autumn foliage; what more could you want in a plant? Acquiring C. cheilianthifolia concludes my preoccupation with the corydalis clan, for now at least; a fixation that began with frequent sightings of rogue yellow C. lutea undermining London’s civic stone walls last summer, and continued through exotic cultivars of pink C. solida, electric blue C. flexuosa and a handful in between. I have now gathered a small collection at the Garden Museum – my most recent horticultural whim – sitting together in a quiet corner of its sheltered courtyard garden. The clan belong to the poppy family, Papaveraceae, comprising a herbaceous rabble notable for their tubular, four-petalled flowers that, en masse, form a soft, frilly carpet. They hail predominantly from temperate Asia; China and Tibet in particular, where species number in the hundreds, but also East Africa, Iran and North America. Corydalis lutea, perhaps the species most commonly recognised, is an escapee from subalpine Europe that appears to thrive wherever it is not wanted. On account of this roguish behaviour, British gardeners often dismiss it as a weed, albeit an inoffensive one like herb Robert, common violet or garlic mustard. Last year, however, I rescued a runaway C. lutea from the perils of a well-trodden pathway, stuck it in a small pot with a grit mulch and left it on a shady stone step. Unexpectedly, the little plant flourished into something very pretty. The spring flowers were attractive, but the foliage more than warranted its place on permanent display, multilayered like a maidenhair fern yet bolder and, dare I say it, more elegantly splayed. Deadheading and the occasional removal of spent leaves kept it prospering through to winter: I became quite proud of my little experiment and repeated it in adjacent pots. What intrigues me most about corydalis is this aptitude for mimicking the foliage of other plants, as apparent in their botanical designations. You have C. thalictrifolia, for example, with leaves resembling thalictrum and C. rutifolia reminiscent of rue. C. anthriscifolia does a wonderful cow parsley impersonation while C. chelidoniifolia is named for its likeness to greater celandine, Chelidonium majus. My Corydalis cheilanthifolia apparently takes after a genus of sweet little rock ferns called Cheilanthes. Looking them up, the similarity is really quite something, the fumewort uncannily frond-like for a plant so taxonomically polar. Corydalis experienced a renaissance in gardens during the 1980s and 1990s as new species came into commercial cultivation. Loud colours caused a stir: hues ranging from deep red and purple to brilliant white, sprouting quickly and generously from a bulbous root system. Prior to lockdown I visited a garden in Suffolk all but neglected for over a decade. Under the dappled deciduous shade of an ageing hazel, pink and white C. solida ran riot: the effect was absolutely mesmerising. This is how you’re likely to encounter fumewort, overjoyed at being left alone in a pleasant enough spot with available moisture in the soil. Indeed, at the Beth Chatto Gardens it is the intermediate site their corydalis prefer – somewhere in between the extremes of shady woodland and exposed gravel. The task this week has been to find a suitable home in the museum garden for my latest purchase. Visually, C. cheilanthifolia’s “fernliness” suggests an Arcadian approach, fitting them between crumbling ledger stones (the museum gardens occupy a 17th century churchyard) in the Georgian romantic style. Horticulturally, however, their needs are not as straightforward as ferns. On the whole, corydalis delight in a confusing range of site preferences. Look up most species in any given plant-finder and you’ll be presented with such ambiguous specifications as: “exposed or sheltered”; “sand, chalk or clay”; “sun, shade or both”. The correct answer ought really be “wherever they choose”, as, being devoted self-seeders, corydalis prefer to place themselves rather than be placed, however inconvenient the favoured spot (I refer back to wall crevices and well-trodden pathways…). With this in mind, I am hedging my bets across three independent locations: one in a pot, another pressed into a west-facing wall (beside some adventitious C. lutea), and the third in cool soil, peeping out from a southern-lit tombstone. May the happiest win, and, with a bit of luck, self-seed a rambunctious new colony. Undoubtedly, I have taken great pleasure from growing fumewort in pots (mine are individually planted, but they would look just as good grouped below a potted shrub). In this way the full plant is exhibited, in all its fine-foliaged glory, and may benefit from free-draining compost and considered watering. Besides ferny C. cheilanthifolia, I suggest trying the popular C. flexuosa cultivar ‘China Blue’, or C. solida ‘White Knight’ for its prominent white flowers. C. anthriscifolia is next on my wishlist for interesting foliage, while in the greenhouse I’ll be sowing the striking purple-pink Corydalis hyrcana. The beauty of these plants is that they are compact and travel easily. They are the perfect choice, therefore, for home delivery: lovable rogues to lift the spirits. Matt Collins is head gardener at the Garden Museum in London. Follow Matt on Instagram: @museum_gardener C. solida 'Beth Evans'

  • Is winter jasmine scented? Why it pays to research even the plants you think you know
    Style
    The Telegraph

    Is winter jasmine scented? Why it pays to research even the plants you think you know

    Winter jasmine – scented or not? Full marks if you said no. Of course, it isn’t. What made me ask the question was the arrival of one of those slightly breathless email from Thompson & Morgan, offering me a “scented shrub collection” for £9.99. The three shrubs in the collection were Philadelphus ‘Belle Étoile’, lilac ‘Miss Kim’ and – you guessed – winter jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum). Of course T&M; know that winter jasmine isn’t scented, and I guess some apprentice web scribbler just got momentarily carried away. But it did make me think that winter jasmine is a bit of a black sheep of the genus, because jasmines are usually scented. Which, in turn, made me wonder how easy it would be for a novice gardener to make the mistake of thinking that all jasmines are scented? Quite easy, apparently. For example, look up winter jasmine on the Gardeners’ World website and you find, of jasmines in general: “Jasminum are evergreen or deciduous shrubs that often climb via climbing stems. Their fragrant flowers are star-shaped.” It then goes on to tell you all about winter jasmine, without mentioning scent again, one way or the other. The RHS also introduce jasmines with: “Jasminum are evergreen or deciduous shrubs, many climbing by twining stems bearing usually pinnate leaves, and star-shaped white, pink or yellow flowers, which are sometimes very fragrant”. We then move on to the details of winter jasmine but, again, there’s no further mention of scent. Although, to be fair, they only say jasmines are sometimes fragrant, and maybe they think we’re all familiar with a common plant like winter jasmine. Nevertheless, I see a pattern here, and it’s not just about jasmine, or about scent. It’s about how far you need to go in telling gardeners about things that aren’t there. Of course most plants aren’t notably scented, but it would be tedious to have to put that in every description. On the other hand, I think in a genus where scent is a big selling point, you can’t just assume that everyone knows that this or that species or variety happens not to be scented. For example, although the RHS may have slightly taken their eye off the ball with jasmines, they don’t make the same mistake with honeysuckles. They introduce them with: “Climbing honeysuckles have twining stems with green or variegated leaves. They have clusters of trumpet-like blooms, with colours ranging from creamy-white, through yellow to red, that are often sweetly scented in summer”, but then go on to warn that “Not all climbing honeysuckles are fragrant (Lonicera × tellmanniana is an example of one that is not), so do check the label before you buy”. But Gardeners’ World don’t seem to have noticed that there are non-scented honeysuckles: “Honeysuckles are usually hardy twinning (sic) climbers or shrubs with scented flowers. Choose from evergreen and deciduous forms. Climbing honeysuckles produce scented flowers, followed by red berries that are very appealing to birds.” In fact, so keen are Gardeners’ World on scented honeysuckles that further down the same page we find: “Lonicera × tellmanniana – orange, yellow flowers from May to July. A deciduous climber with wonderful scent”. Yes, this is the same plant the RHS rightly warned you about: a lovely plant, but without scent. The lesson, I think, if you’re contemplating buying a plant in a genus where most species have some particular feature, is to assume nothing, and do your research first. Ken Thompson is a plant biologist with a keen interest in the science of gardening. His most recent book is a second collection of his Telegraph columns: Notes From a Sceptical Gardener. Order a copy from books.telegraph.co.uk.

  • Orlando Bloom says he’s looking forward to late nights and bonding with his newborn daughter: ‘It’s a magical time’
    Celebrity
    The Independent

    Orlando Bloom says he’s looking forward to late nights and bonding with his newborn daughter: ‘It’s a magical time’

    Orlando Bloom has revealed the moments he is most looking forward to sharing with his newborn daughter.The Pirates of the Caribbean star — who is already dad to nine-year-old son Flynn with ex-wife Miranda Kerr — is currently expecting a daughter with fiancée Katy Perry.

  • Is Derek Jarman's garden a work of art? No, it's more important than that
    Lifestyle
    The Telegraph

    Is Derek Jarman's garden a work of art? No, it's more important than that

    David Austin on roses. Gertrude Jekyll on colour. Reginald Blomfield on the English formal garden. Culpeper on herbs. The garden books I’m unpacking might be the favourites of my Aunt Rosemary, the parish council chairman of her village in Suffolk. But open the books and they are signed: “Derek Jarman, Prospect Cottage.” Jarman died 26 years ago this year, and his books, drawings, tools and paintings go on display in an exhibition that opens at the Garden Museum today. Jarman’s work was an assault on the establishment. Films such as The Last of England (1987) presented Mrs Thatcher’s England as a fascist, derelict state; as an outspoken activist for gay rights he criticised Ian McKellen as too chummy with the Establishment; Jarman was also one of the first celebrities to speak publicly about having Aids. Watch Jordan’s Dance, restored by the Luma Foundation and now on the website of Manchester Art Gallery as it prepares to open its postponed exhibition “Protest!” Jordan, the original punk – whom Jarman met at Victoria station and who, he said, gave the Sex Pistols their style – dances in a white tutu around a bonfire of burning books in Deptford. How did a man with such a heat of anger come to give Beth Chatto tips on gravel gardening? Jarman was a very English radical. He wished to be buried in an ancient and picturesque church in Romney Marsh, but prayed to God to be “reincarnated as queer”, the words carved into one of the “black paintings” on the bedroom wall of Prospect Cottage. Life and death came together in this house and garden he made on Dungeness, recently rescued for the nation almost as Jarman left it, by The Art Fund, Tate, and Creative Folkestone with a £3.5 million campaign.