• Children with alcoholic parents more likely to have violent dating relationships as teenagers, study claims
    Style
    The Independent

    Children with alcoholic parents more likely to have violent dating relationships as teenagers, study claims

    Growing up with a parent who has an alcohol use disorder increases the chance of having violent dating relationships as a teenager, a study has shown. According to research by the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions, the root causes of dating violence in teenagers can be identified as early as infancy. “Although teen dating violence is typically viewed as a problem related specifically to adolescent development, our findings indicate that the risk for aggressive behaviour and involvement in dating violence are related to stressors experienced much earlier in life,” says lead study author and senior research scientist at RIA, Jennifer A. Livingston, PhD.

  • How personality affects sleep quality
    Style
    The Independent

    How personality affects sleep quality

    How easy you find drifting off at night could be down to your personality, a new study has shown. According to research carried out on 1,000 Americans, introverts are more likely to suffer disrupted sleep than extroverts. The study was carried out by Best Mattress Brand and involved participants’ personality traits being determined by the Myers Briggs Test.

  • The foods to eat for good dental health, according to a dentist
    Style
    The Independent

    The foods to eat for good dental health, according to a dentist

    While we often think about how to keep various body parts in tip-top condition - avocado for glowing skin and protein to build muscles, for example - many of us give little thought to our oral health past brushing twice a day and flossing (albeit not as often as we know we should). Good dental nutrition is essential, and according to a dentist, “your toothpaste isn’t that important” when it comes to oral health. What we eat plays a big role in keeping our teeth healthy, and Australian dentist Dr Steven Lin has revealed which foods we should be consuming to do so.

  • Screen time can actually be beneficial to children, claims child media expert
    Style
    The Independent

    Screen time can actually be beneficial to children, claims child media expert

    Children under the age of nine spend more than two hours a day on screens, a new report has found. Whilst these stats might be setting off alarm bells for parents, children’s media expert Sara DeWitt insists that screen time can actually be beneficial for kids. Speaking at TED in April, DeWitt debunked three of the most common fears parents have about screen time for kids.

  • Norovirus: How to avoid winter vomiting bug and what to do if you get it
    Style
    The Independent

    Norovirus: How to avoid winter vomiting bug and what to do if you get it

    Norovirus can floor you with cramping, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Better-known as the winter vomiting bug, it causes inflammation of the stomach and intestines which triggers an array of nasty symptoms.

  • Signs and symptoms you've got flu
    Style
    Natasha Preskey

    Signs and symptoms you've got flu

    We expect the odd cold once thick tights and Pumpkin Spice Lattes are back in our lives. But succumbing to the flu is not an option when there are Christmas parties, mince pies and, err, a limited number of paid sick days to think about. Colds and flu share many signs and symptoms, but there are also some key differences between the two. These are all the flu symptoms you need to watch out for. Cold symptoms With the flu, you will get the sore throat, cough, runny nose and sneezes typical to colds, but it will all be more rapid. ...

  • Stress can be as bad for your body as junk food
    Style
    Yahoo Beauty

    Stress can be as bad for your body as junk food

    Stress is one of those things most people know they need less of, but struggle to actually put that in practice. Now, here’s more motivation to try cut back on your stress levels: It could wreck havoc on your health. According to a new mouse study published in the journal Scientific Reports, stress can negatively impact your gut microbiota (the microorganisms that are crucial to your digestive and metabolic health) the same way as eating a junk food diet.

  • 'Living with an illness no-one believes is real'
    Style
    Cosmo

    'Living with an illness no-one believes is real'

    Why was the life was being sucked out of Jennifer Brea, and why were doctors insisting there was nothing biologically wrong?

  • White men who exercise every day have 86 per cent higher risk of heart disease than black men, study claims
    Style
    The Independent

    White men who exercise every day have 86 per cent higher risk of heart disease than black men, study claims

    White men who exercise for seven-and-a-half hours a week or more are almost twice as likely to suffer from heart disease then those who do a moderate amount, a new study has found. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago looked at the exercise habits of 3,175 participants for a 25 year-long period and found that white men who exercised a lot were more likely to build up plaque in their arteries which can lead to severe cardiac problems. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men in the UK, according to Public Health England.

  • Stop offering your seat to elderly people on public transport, advise health experts
    Style
    The Independent

    Stop offering your seat to elderly people on public transport, advise health experts

    You may think that offering your seat to someone elderly on public transport is a considerate thing to do, but experts have revealed that doing so could actually hamper their health as they age. In fact, old people should be encouraged to stand and discouraged from taking it easy in order to keep themselves fit, an Oxford professor claims. Sir Muir Gray, clinical adviser to Public Health England, has spoken out to say the elderly should try to walk for ten minutes a day and relatives should encourage to take the stairs instead of a lift or excalator.

  • Even a dietician is shamed for what she puts in her children's lunchbox
    Style
    Lauren Sharkey

    Even a dietician is shamed for what she puts in her children's lunchbox

    Other parents think Kate Save's sandwich, fruit and cereal lunch is bad for her children.

  • Inside St Christopher's Hospice: Families walk on hot coals to help hit £14m fundraising target
    Style
    The Independent

    Inside St Christopher's Hospice: Families walk on hot coals to help hit £14m fundraising target

    St Christopher’s hospice is celebrating 50 years. Despite its main mission of providing palliative care for terminally ill patients, at St Christopher’s the focus is on life, rather than death. To be able to take care of 6,000 patients and their families, St Christopher’s spend on average £20 million, with only £6 million being funded by the NHS.

  • Fat-burning muscle-building pill could be close, claims scientist
    Style
    The Independent

    Fat-burning muscle-building pill could be close, claims scientist

    Ronald Evans, a researcher at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California, says his latest drug is a completely new concept. Back in 2008, Evans finished a study conducted on mice which found that an experimental compound called GW501516 (aka Endurobol) significantly increased fat burn and athletic performance, even without much exercise. The pills might not work on humans and there could be dangerous side effects, Evans wanted to make clear.

  • Moderate drinking by parents leaves children anxious
    Style
    The Independent

    Moderate drinking by parents leaves children anxious

    Three in 10 parents admit to being drunk in front of their children, a new study has found. Half have been tipsy around them, according to the Institute of Alcohol Studies, whose research revealed that moderate drinking around children leaves them feeling anxious, embarrassed and disrupts their bedtime. The study also found that children who see their parents drinking are less likely to look up to them as role models, reports The Guardian.

  • Young model faces early menopause aged 26 after doctors mistook her endometriosis for IBS
    Style
    The Independent

    Young model faces early menopause aged 26 after doctors mistook her endometriosis for IBS

    A 26-year-old model from Essex faces early menopause after doctors mistook her endometriosis for IBS for 10 years.

  • Painful looking photo reveals how a hairdresser's job impacts her body
    Style
    Yahoo Style UK

    Painful looking photo reveals how a hairdresser's job impacts her body

    Be grateful for your balayage.

  • 48-Hour Challenge game circulating on Facebook encourages children to go missing for days at a time
    Style
    The Independent

    48-Hour Challenge game circulating on Facebook encourages children to go missing for days at a time

    A worrying 'game' called the 48-Hour Challenge is circulating on Facebook which encourages children to go missing for up to two days at a time. The sick viral trend also says points are awarded for every social media mention while they're missing, meaning that frantic friends and family who post appeals to find them are welcomed. It's a copycat version of the Game of 72 which circulated in Western Europe several years ago, in which children tried to go missing for up to 72 hours.

  • How to lift weights safely and effectively
    Style
    The Independent

    How to lift weights safely and effectively

    When it comes to burning fat, weight lifting and resistance work is essential. By building muscle, you boost your basal metabolic rate, meaning you burn more calories over the course of the day even when you’re not exercising. When it comes to lifting weights, ensuring correct technique is crucial.

  • Dyeing your hair could increase your breast cancer risk
    Style
    Nisean Lorde

    Dyeing your hair could increase your breast cancer risk

    "Women are advised to reduce exposure to synthetic hair dyes to two - six times per year."

  • Have you been making grilled cheese sandwiches wrong all along?
    Style
    Yahoo Canada Style

    Have you been making grilled cheese sandwiches wrong all along?

    Australian food writer Tristan Lutze says we’ve all been missing a key ingredient.

  • Eating placenta after birth 'borders on cannibalism', says top gynaecologist
    Style
    The Independent

    Eating placenta after birth 'borders on cannibalism', says top gynaecologist

    It’s a stomach-churning trend which is justified by its purported health benefits. The act of consuming placenta after birth has been popularised by celebrities such as Kim Kardashian and Coleen Rooney. The placenta, which is also known as afterbirth, connects the foetus to the uterine wall and is the barrier through which nutrients and waste pass via the mother’s blood supply.

  • Frequent hair dye use linked to increased breast cancer risk
    Style
    The Independent

    Frequent hair dye use linked to increased breast cancer risk

    Frequently dying your hair has been linked to an increased risk of developing breast cancer. According to a study by London surgeon Kefah Mokbel, women who colour their hair have a 14 per cent rise in rates of breast cancer. Professor Mokbel, who works at the Princess Grace Hospital in Marylebone, London, advises that women dye their hair no more than two to five times a year.

  • Period pains responsible for five million sick days in the UK each year
    Style
    The Independent

    Period pains responsible for five million sick days in the UK each year

    Heavy periods are causing millions of women to take time off work, a new survey has revealed. Accounting for 5,581,186 sick days each year, the condition is costing the British economy £531m. One in five women suffer from heavy periods however, 73 per cent admit to lying to their bosses when one causes them to take a sick day.

  • How to get enough vitamin D in autumn and winter
    Style
    The Independent

    How to get enough vitamin D in autumn and winter

    With darkness descending before we’ve left the office every day, getting enough vitamin D can be a challenge. A recent study by BetterYou found that 19 per cent of British adults have low levels of vitamin D, and this is particularly problematic in autumn and winter. “Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is key for the maintenance of minerals such as calcium and phosphorus,” nutritionist and author of Re-nourish, Rhiannon Lambert, explained to The Independent.

  • Natural cold remedies: How to feel better without heavy duty medicine
    Style
    Natasha Preskey

    Natural cold remedies: How to feel better without heavy duty medicine

    From laying low to breathing in stream, expert natural cold remedies that will save you reaching for the Lemsip.