• Couple marry despite wife catching husband ‘sexually assaulting bridesmaid’ days earlier
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    The Independent

    Couple marry despite wife catching husband ‘sexually assaulting bridesmaid’ days earlier

    Two days before his wedding, the groom spent the afternoon floating down the Delaware River in eastern Pennsylvania with his wedding party.Groomsmen and bridesmaids passed around beers and shots of vodka as they guided paddle boards and rafts downstream.

  • Bumblebee parents miss out on sleep while caring for young, study finds
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    The Independent

    Bumblebee parents miss out on sleep while caring for young, study finds

    It’s not just human parents that feel chronically exhausted due to lack of sleep while looking after their young.Scientists say worker bees also get less sleep when they’re caring for larvae – even if they’re looking after offspring that are not their own.

  • Women over 50 ‘having time of their lives’ and more confident than those in 20s, study finds
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    The Independent

    Women over 50 ‘having time of their lives’ and more confident than those in 20s, study finds

    Women aged 50-65 are happier with their age, relationship and confidence than women in their 20s, a study has found.Research into the lives of modern women revealed older generations feel they are living their best lives.

  • Duchess of Sussex wears £5 borrowed earrings to lavish Rome wedding
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    The Telegraph

    Duchess of Sussex wears £5 borrowed earrings to lavish Rome wedding

    It has been described as one of this year’s most glamorous weddings with a guest list boasting hollywood royalty and actual royalty to boot.

  • Autumn Equinox 2019: The science behind the changing seasons
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    The Telegraph

    Autumn Equinox 2019: The science behind the changing seasons

    When leaves begin to fall, temperatures drop and days become shorter, it can only mean autumn is on its way. No matter how hot the summer has been, the next season of the year will soon be upon us with home comforts, bronzed woodland hues and a pumpkin or two.

  • Ten-year-old girl dies after contracting deadly brain-eating amoeba while swimming in Texas river
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    The Independent

    Ten-year-old girl dies after contracting deadly brain-eating amoeba while swimming in Texas river

    A 10-year-old girl has died after contracting a rare brain-eating amoeba while swimming in a Texas river.Lily Mae Avant contracted the parasite after swimming with her family in the Brazos river near Waco. She began having a headache, and her family then reported a fever. Days later, Lily began acting strangely, before becoming incoherent and unresponsive.

  • Schools should take more special needs children, Government’s spending watchdog says
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    The Telegraph

    Schools should take more special needs children, Government’s spending watchdog says

    Mainstream schools should take more special needs children because it is costing too much to educate them elsewhere, the Government’s spending watchdog has found.

  • One in four adults in England prescribed potentially addictive drugs last year
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    The Independent

    One in four adults in England prescribed potentially addictive drugs last year

    Almost 12 million adults in England were prescribed potentially addictive drugs such as sleeping pills and painkillers last year, with half taking them long-term, a new report says.A review of five classes of medicines - including anti-anxiety drugs, anti-depressants and opioid painkillers - found some patients struggle to come off them, suffering suicidal thoughts and anxiety as a result.

  • Pupil protest over gender neutral uniform policy sees police called to school gates
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    The Telegraph

    Pupil protest over gender neutral uniform policy sees police called to school gates

    Pupils have protested over ‘gender neutral’ uniform policy with police called to the school gates.

  • Teenager 'first in UK' to go deaf and blind due to junk food diet, report reveals
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    The Telegraph

    Teenager 'first in UK' to go deaf and blind due to junk food diet, report reveals

    A teenager is believed to be the first in the UK to go deaf and blind due to his junk food diet, a report has warned.

  • Suicides rise to 16-year high across UK
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    The Independent

    Suicides rise to 16-year high across UK

    The rate of suicide in the UK has hit a 16-year high after surging in the past year following half a decade of decline, new figures show.Data from the Office for Nationals Statistics (ONS) reveal 6,507 suicides were registered last year, marking a 12 per cent rise on the previous year and the highest rate since 2002.

  • Teenager left blind and deaf by decade-long diet of sausages, crisps and processed food
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    The Independent

    Teenager left blind and deaf by decade-long diet of sausages, crisps and processed food

    A teenager has been left blind and deaf after living off a diet of chips, crisps and sausages.The youngster’s family, from Bristol, realised something was seriously wrong when he began to lose his hearing at the age of 14.

  • Diabetes medication can cut risk of heart failure by more than a quarter, scientists find
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    The Independent

    Diabetes medication can cut risk of heart failure by more than a quarter, scientists find

    A common diabetes medication can be used to treat patients with heart failure, according to new research.Scientists have found dapagliflozin – a drug that helps control blood sugar levels – can also reduce the risk of cardiovascular conditions worsening or causing death by more than 25 per cent.

  • At least two children in every class have contemplated suicide because of bullying, Diana Award study reveals
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    The Telegraph

    At least two children in every class have contemplated suicide because of bullying, Diana Award study reveals

    At least two children in every class has contemplated suicide because of bullying, a study for the Diana Award has revealed.

  • Babies born by Caesarean ‘one third more likely to develop autism’, study finds
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    The Independent

    Babies born by Caesarean ‘one third more likely to develop autism’, study finds

    Babies born by Caesarean section are 33 per cent more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, according to a study which considered 20 million births.The findings, which combined 61 studies from 19 countries dating back to 1999, also said children delivered by Caesarean had a 17 per cent higher chance of developing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  • Black super new moon 2019: What is it and will we be able to see the lunar event in the UK?
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    The Telegraph

    Black super new moon 2019: What is it and will we be able to see the lunar event in the UK?

    A black super new moon is the next lunar phenomenon to take place this year, when both a black moon and a super new moon will occur at the same time.

  • Dog owners are slimmer, fitter and earn more, study shows
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    The Telegraph

    Dog owners are slimmer, fitter and earn more, study shows

    Dog owners have lower blood pressure, are less likely to be obese and are on average 2.2lbs lighter than people without canine companions, scientists have discovered.

  • Blood test can detect ovarian cancer two years earlier
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    The Telegraph

    Blood test can detect ovarian cancer two years earlier

    A blood test which can detect ovarian cancer two years earlier than current methods could be used to screen women, scientists hope.

  • Cannabis oil too expensive to prescribe to epileptic children on NHS, advisory body finds
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    The Telegraph

    Cannabis oil too expensive to prescribe to epileptic children on NHS, advisory body finds

    A cannabis drug used to treat children with epilepsy is too expensive to prescribe even though it reduces patients’ seizures, the UK’s medical advisory body has said.

  • Four-in-one pill created to reduce heart disease and strokes saves lives, study shows
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    The Telegraph

    Four-in-one pill created to reduce heart disease and strokes saves lives, study shows

    A four-in-one pill created to reduce heart disease and strokes could help older people avoid taking so much medication.

  • Parents are taking children to A&E as getting a GP appointment is 'too difficult', survey finds
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    The Telegraph

    Parents are taking children to A&E as getting a GP appointment is 'too difficult', survey finds

    Parents of toddlers are increasingly taking their children to A&E;, as they say securing a GP appointment is too difficult, research suggests.

  • Left-Handers Day 2019: The history behind the celebration and 13 facts about the wonderful left
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    The Telegraph

    Left-Handers Day 2019: The history behind the celebration and 13 facts about the wonderful left

    Happy Left Handers Day! From scissors and smudged ink to spiral-bound notebooks and impossible-to-use tin openers, the lefties' life struggle is real.

  • Mental health services 'putting women at risk' by failing to ask them about domestic abuse
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    The Independent

    Mental health services 'putting women at risk' by failing to ask them about domestic abuse

    Mental health services are “putting women at risk” by failing to ask them about their experience of domestic abuse, a new report has found.The study, carried out by Agenda, a charity which campaigns for women and girls at risk, found more than a third of NHS mental health trusts are failing to ask women about domestic abuse in spite of recommended guidelines.Campaigners argue it is especially important mental health services ask about domestic abuse given the high rates of violence and abuse suffered by those who access them. Some 38 per cent of women who have a mental health problem have experienced domestic abuse.The report found there is a postcode lottery in the support mental health services are providing to survivors – with one trust saying they asked just three per cent of patients about domestic abuse.This is at direct loggerheads with National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (Nice) guidelines which specifically stipulate everyone should be asked.The findings – based on Freedom of Information requests – show that more than a third of NHS mental health trusts that responded (42 of 58) have no policy on “routine enquiry” about domestic violence and abuse.Chlo, a domestic abuse survivor who now works for a domestic violence charity, was a teenager when she first started to experience such abuse but failed to receive the help she needed.She said: “I was in mental health services when it started, but no one talked to me about my relationship or picked up the warning signs.“It was police that first suggested what I was experiencing was domestic abuse. It hadn’t even occurred to me that’s what it was until then, I didn’t know about emotional abuse or coercive control. After that, I was referred to victim support and eventually, he was convicted.“I know that for other women experiencing abuse, it doesn’t always happen like that. The peer research showed that despite everything women are resilient and still try to engage with services, but often it’s the services who are ‘hard to reach’ or difficult to engage with, not the women themselves.”Another survivor said: “No one even bothered, even when I went to hospital when my tooth got knocked out, even then they never even bothered to refer you.”The report comes as charities, practitioners and other leading experts call for the Domestic Abuse Bill to ensure all public services ask about domestic violence.Agenda is calling for the government to amend the landmark legislation, which was introduced to parliament last month, to put a duty on all public authorities to make sure staff across the public sector are making trained enquiries into domestic abuse. This must include funding for training for public sector workers, they said.Jemima Olchawski, chief executive of Agenda, said: “Women who have experienced domestic abuse come into contact with a wide range of services – both while they are facing abuse and in the years that follow.“Whether it’s a local GP, job centre or mental health service, staff across our public services should be trained to ask about domestic abuse and act appropriately. If not, we are putting women at risk. A change in the law is needed to make sure we’re not missing opportunities to help.”The latest figures show that out of an estimated two million victims of domestic abuse in the last year, some 1.3 million were women. Research shows 85 per cent of survivors sought help five times on average from professionals in the year before they got effective help to stop the abuse, four out of five victims never call the police, but many will visit their GP as a result of the abuse they are suffering.Sophie Corlett, of mental health charity Mind, said: “A large proportion of women and girls coming into contact with mental health services either have experienced or are experiencing, abuse. Domestic abuse can significantly increase the likelihood of developing both common mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression and severe and enduring mental health problems such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.“A thorough understanding of a woman’s experience of trauma can hugely improve the quality of mental healthcare that they receive and avoid services inadvertently re-traumatising them. Women must be asked the right questions and properly supported by those charged with their care.”Baroness Hilary Armstrong, chair of the National Commission on Domestic and Sexual Violence, said she had heard from women across the country about the ”devastating impact” of domestic abuse.“For far too many, the legacy that trauma leaves is poor mental health, problems with substance use, homelessness, or a criminal record,” she said. “Women told me that services let them down. Time and again the signs of abuse were not picked up by professionals, and too often women were bounced around or even turned away from services.”The majority (70 per cent) of victims of domestic violence deaths are female. Every week in the UK, two women are murdered by a partner or ex-partner.In 2013-14, 93 per cent of defendants in domestic violence court cases were male and 84 per cent of victims were female.